Tuesday, June 3, 2008

Sunrise Symposium     

102/C. Incorporating Molecular Diagnostics for Virus Detection into the Routine Clinical Laboratory 

6:30 am - 7:30 am

153 A

Panel Discussion:

Panel Participants:

C. C. Ginocchio;
North Shore-LIJ Hlth. System Lab., Lake Success, NY.

R. L. Hodinka;
Children's Hosp. of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA.

One of the major challenges facing laboratories today is to provide comprehensive diagnostics while balancing the demands of clinicians and administrators. With the looming threat of emerging viral pathogens (e.g., avian influenza, SARS coronavirus) and the discovery of new viral agents (e.g., human metapneumovirus, bocavirus) that cause human disease, more laboratories are considering the implementation of viral diagnostics. This can be achieved by developing practical, cost-effective, medically relevant testing algorithms suited for your laboratory and your patient population. An integral part of testing should include molecular methodologies. With recent advances in the technologies and instrumentation, and the availability of an expanding array of analyte-specific reagents and FDA-approved assays, molecular testing can become routine for hospitals of all sizes. This session will discuss issues and answer questions concerning molecular diagnostics and how this technology can be incorporated into your laboratory.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Understand the process of developing appropriate test algorithms that include molecular diagnostics.

• Develop tools to assess the clinical and financial impact of test and method selection.

• Assess the benefits and limitations of testing available as pertaining to your institution’s clinical spectrum, laboratory needs and capabilities.

Sunrise Symposium   

103/C. What Should We Teach Bench Techs About Antimicrobial Resistance? 

6:30 am - 7:30 am

156 A

Panel Discussion:

Panel Participants:

J. Hindler;
Univ. of California Healthcare Sys., Los Angeles, CA.

J. B. Patel;
CDC, Atlanta, GA.

This session will describe facts about antimicrobial resistance mechanisms that are most important for practicing clinical microbiologists to ensure that the test results they report are accurate and communicated appropriately. A strategy for teaching clinical microbiologists and students about antimicrobial resistance mechanisms will be presented. Resources that might be used to assist in the educational process will be listed. The pros and cons of using expert software to identify and report various resistance mechanisms will be described in addition to the precautions that should be taken to avoid becoming complacent with machine-generated answers. Case studies will be used to highlight results encountered when various resistance mechanisms are present. The overriding goal is to increase participant's awareness of current antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and the ways in which they impact antimicrobial susceptibility test results.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Discuss how understanding antimicrobial resistance mechanisms can help with decisions about routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing and reporting.

• Describe why some antimicrobial resistance mechanisms may be difficult to detect and why special tests must be done to detect them.

• Summarize the importance of interacting with infection control and public health personnel when unusual or new found resistance is detected in clinical specimens.

Sunrise Symposium   

104/C. Laboratory Diagnosis of Vaginitis and Vaginosis

6:30 am - 7:30 am

157 A

Panel Discussion:

Panel Participants:

C. A. Spiegel;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

N. E. Cornish;
Nebraska Methodist Hosp. & Children's Hosp., Omaha, NE.

There are two major questions to be asked in laboratory diagnosis of vaginitis/vaginosis; 1) what organisms should we test for, and 2) what appropriate methods are available for testing. For women of reproductive age, published guidelines indicate the need to routinely diagnose only vulvovaginal candidiasis (yeast vaginitis; YV), trichomoniasis (TV), and bacterial vaginosis (BV). Routine bacterial culture for E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus, for example, is inappropriate and may lead to unnecessary antimicrobial treatment. There are several testing methods available for diagnosis of YV, TV and BV including microscopy, culture, molecular and biochemical methods, all of which will be discussed.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Describe the clinical vaginal disorders which affect women and girls and what appropriate laboratory testing methods are available for each.

• Appraise and optimize your current laboratory practices for diagnosis of vaginitis and vaginosis.

• Use national clinical guidelines to explain your laboratory testing policies and educate the clinicians and patients that request testing in your laboratory.

Sunrise Symposium   

105/C. Lean Principles in Microbiology: How Can They Help Me? 

6:30 am - 7:30 am

160 A

Panel Discussion:

Panel Participants:

D. L. Blecker Shelly;
The Children's Hosp. of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA.

K. L. McGowan;
Children's Hosp. of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA.

This is an interactive session appropriate for microbiology laboratory directors, managers, supervisors and individuals interested in process improvement. In order to deliver optimal laboratory services, it is necessary to understand what is important to the patient, physician and other customers and where service problems exist. Once these are identified, Lean principles are applied in a systematic approach to identifying and eliminating waste through continuous improvement activities. By utilizing various methodologies, a laboratory can identify non-value added activities such as repeat testing, excess inventory, specimen waiting and transport time, and underutilized personnel resources. Emphasis will be placed on discussing 5S methodology for organizing, cleaning, developing, and sustaining a productive work environment, with the speakers providing examples from their own experience. Discussion will include other aspects of Lean transformation as they pertain to overcoming barriers, change management, and successful outcomes.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Understand the benefits of Lean transformation and the resources required for successful implementation.

• Identify components of Lean, such as 5S, and how they eliminate waste and increase quality.

• Recognize potential applications for their own laboratory.

Colloquium

106. Understanding the Microbiological Aspects of
Global Change 

8:00 am - 10:30 am

253 A

Conveners:

T. Balser;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

K. Treseder;
Univ. of California, Irvine, CA.

Presentations::

8:00 am Long-Term Patterns in Microbial Community Response To Multiple Interacting Environmental Changes.

T. Balser;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

8:30 am Climate Variability and Earthworm Engineering of the Soil Microbial Environment.

M. C. Fisk;
Miami Univ., Oxford, OH.

9:00 am Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Alters Terrestrial and Aquatic Microbial Communities in a Northern Michigan Watershed.

J. J. Kelly;
Loyola Univ., Chicago, IL.

9:30 am Linking Soil Microbial Community Dynamics to Biogeochemical Processes.

S. K. Schmidt;
Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO.

10:00 am The Role of Fungi in Mediating Ecosystem Responses to Global Change.

K. Treseder;
Univ. of California, Irvine, CA.

This topic will address the impacts of human activities on the diversity, distribution, and function of microbes. It will also cover potential consequences of these changes for the environment and for human society. This issue is receiving much attention from ecologists, microbiologists, and the media.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Identify major effects of human activities on microbial ecology.

• Relate global change effects on microbes to ecological processes that are controlled by microbes (e.g., decomposition, weathering, infectious diseases.

• Evaluate potential changes in policy that will address these issue.

Colloquium  

107. The New Normal Microbial Flora of Humans and Alterations in Disease States

8:00 am - 10:30 am

Ballroom West

Convener:

D. N. Fredricks;
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Res. Ctr., Seattle, WA.

Presentations:

8:00 am Novel Bacterial Communities in the Human Vaginal Ecosystem.

D. N. Fredricks;
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Res. Ctr., Seattle, WA.

8:30 am The Human Intestinal Microflora in Health and Disease.

D. N. Frank;
Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO.

9:00 am The Intestinal Flora: How Phylogeny Affects Physiology.

J. Sonnenburg;
Washington Univ. Sch. of Med., St. Louis, MO.

9:30 am Symbiotics, Mucosal Communities, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

G. T. Macfarlane;
Univ. of Dundee, Dundee, UNITED KINGDOM.

10:00 am A Molecular and Metagenomic View of Human Microbial Diversity.

D. A. Relman;
Stanford Univ., Palo Alto, CA.

As a result of advancements in molecular amplification and sequencing, the ability to identify and quantify microorganisms incapable of in vitro cultivation has become possible. With these advances, our understanding of the diversity of the normal colonizing microbial flora of human surfaces is rapidly expanding requiring a shift in current paradigms. Interlinked with an expanded awareness of the biodiversity of human microbial flora is the increasing possibility that alterations in normal flora, not just the presence of recognized pathogens, could lead to a state of disease. Novel treatments could rely on our ability to reconstitute the inhabitants of the normal flora associated with health. This colloquium will explore biodiversity within the human environment concentrating on specific sites of colonization such as the skin, vagina, and gut, and will consider examples where altered “normal flora”  generates disease.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Recognize that a significant proportion of colonizing microbial flora can only be identified by molecular means, and reformulate the concept of normal microbial flora based on these molecular insights.

• Consider that certain disease processes might result from unbalanced maintenance of normal populations and quantities of colonizing flora, and recognize the impact of intestinal bacterial communities on host physiology.

• Distinguish between probiotic, prebiotic, and symbiotic strategies to influence the human indigenous microflora and maintain health.

• Examine evidence for the concept of human disease produced by microbial communities and apply this concept to at least one human niche.

Colloquium

108. Viruses, Viruses Everywhere: What, How and When? 

8:00 am - 10:30 am

204 A

Convener:

K. Stedman;
Portland State Univ., Portland, OR.

Presentations:

8:00 am Big Bangs in the Virus Universe.

E. V. Koonin;
NIH/NCBI, Bethesda, MD.

8:30 am Viruses of the Archaea.

D. Prangishvili, Sr.;
Inst. Pasteur, Paris, FRANCE.

9:00 am Is Everything Everywhere? Biogeography of Extreme Viruses.

K. Stedman;
Pasteur Inst., Paris, FRANCE.

9:30 am Metagenomic Sequencing for Viral Discovery.

M. Breitbart;
Univ. of South Florida, Saint Petersburg, FL.

10:00 am Blurring the RNA-DNA Divide: Fast Evolution in ssDNA Viruses.

S. M. D. Duffy;
Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA.

This session will provide an overview of the massive recent progress in the understanding of viruses and their roles in the environment and evolution in a non-medical context. It will be accessible to all ASM members and a general audience will be expected. Presentations will be on virus ubiquity and diversity, the role of viruses in the origin of life and the division of the three domains, viruses as models to study fundamental evolutionary questions, and recent developments in microbial virus resistance.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Discuss and understand virus ubiquity and diversity.

• Appreciate the use of viruses as models for evolutionary studies.

• Understand the role of CRISPR elements in microbial virus resistance.

Colloquium

109. A Moving Experience: How DNA Translocation
Machines Do Their Work 

8:00 am - 10:30 am

160 A

Convener:

D. Dubnau;
Pub. Hlth. Res. Inst., Newark, NJ.

Presentations:

8:00 am FtsK Mechanics and Chromosome Segregation.

J. Allemand;
Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris, FRANCE.

8:30 am The Phage DNA Packaging Motor Mechanism.

L. W. Black;
Univ. of Maryland Med. Sch., Baltimore, MD.

9:00 am The Regulated Injection of the Bacteriophage N4 Genome.

L. Rothman-Denes;
Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

9:30 am DNA Translocation Through Conjugation Machines.

P. J. Christie;
Univ. of Texas Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Houston, TX.

10:00 am DNA Translocation During Transformation of Bacillus subtilis.

D. Dubnau;
Pub. Hlth. Res. Inst., Newark, NJ.

A number of bacterial proteins or protein complexes have been described that translocate DNA. Insights have been gained into the molecular mechanisms of these molecular machines, several of which will be described in this session.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Name several DNA-translocating molecular machines.

• Explain what is known about their constituent proteins and mechanisms of action.

• Identify difference among these machines.

Symposium  

110/A. Emerging Resistance Threats 

8:00 am - 10:30 am

210 B

Conveners:

D. E. Low;
Mt. Sinai Hosp., Toronto, ON, CANADA.

P. A. Bradford;
Wyeth Res., Pearl River, NY.

Presentations:

8:00 am Div A Lecture: KPCs: Escape from New York?

J. M. Quale;
State Univ. of New York Downstate Med. Ctr., Brooklyn, NY.

9:00 am Pneumococcal Serotype 19A: Who Said It Was Over?

K. P. Klugman;
Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA.

9:30 am Staphylococcal Glycopeptide Resistance: The Real Deal?

H. S. Gold;
Beth Israel Deaconess Med. Ctr., Boston, MA.

10:00 am Antifungal Candida Resistance: The New and the Old.

D. S. Perlin;
Pub. Hlth. Res. Inst., Newark, NJ.

We have become complacent about the development and prevalence of resistance to certain classes of antimicrobials. However, we are now seeing the further evolution of broad-spectrum b-lactamases that are relatively fit, an increase in resistant disease caused by nonvaccine types (so-called replacement disease) of pneumococci, a reduction in activity of the antibiotic work horse vancomycin against staphylococci, the emergence of resistance to new antifungals, and transferable quinolone resistance. Their recognition is important in order to minimize their impact.

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• List new important resistance threats.

• Identify the mechanisms of resistance and their epidemiology.

• Evaluate their clinical relevance and impact on patient care.

Symposium  

111/B. Type II Protein Secretion: New Insights into Structure, Function, and Pathogenesis 

Co-Sponsored By: Division D

8:00 am - 10:30 am

210 A

Conveners:

N. Cianciotto;
Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL.

M. Sandkvist;
Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch., Ann Arbor, MI.

Presentations:

8:00 am The Type II Secretion Paradigm and Related Molecular Systems.

A. Filloux;
Imperial Coll., London, UNITED KINGDOM.

8:30 am Secretins: Structure, Function and Assembly.

A. Pugsley;
Inst. Pasteur, Paris, FRANCE.

9:00 am Architecture of the Type 2 Secretion System.

W. G. J. Hol;
Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA.

9:30 am Beyond the Type II Terminus: Vesicle-Mediated Secretion of Type II Substrates.

M. Kuehn;
Duke Univ. Med. Ctr., Durham, NC.

10:00 am The Many Substrates and Functions of Type II Secretion.

N. Cianciotto;
Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL.

Type II secretion (T2S) is one of six protein secretion systems that permit the export of proteins from within the Gram-negative cell to the extracellular milieu and/or into host cells. With the sequencing of many genomes, it is now clear that T2S genes are common, but not universal, within Gram-negative bacteria. Recent structural, biochemical, and genetic studies have revealed new information concerning the components of the T2S apparatus, the molecular interactions and cellular locations of T2S proteins, the mechanism of T2S, and the evolutionary relationship between T2S and type IV pilus biogenesis. Other studies indicate that T2S promotes the virulence of human, animal, and plant pathogens as well as the physiology of various environmental bacteria. Finally, recent studies also show that the output of T2S is greater than previously thought and includes both well-known toxins and enzymes and potentially novel substrates. Thus, it is an opportune time to place the spotlight on T2S and affirm its uniqueness and importance along side that of the other secretion pathways. In this symposium, five experts in the field will present the latest information on T2S, based upon work with key pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, and Legionella pneumophila.

Interactive Round Table   

112/C. You Are the Jury: The Microbiologist as Expert Witness-Real Case with Real Attorney

8:00 am - 10:30 am

Ballroom East

Conveners:

A. S. Weissfeld;
Microbiology Specialists, Inc., Houston, TX.

E. J. Baron;
Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA.

Presentations:

8:00 am Introduction
E.J. Baron; Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA

8:15 am Case Presentation
J.A. Morello; Lakeland, FL

8:30 am Interactive Q&A

8:35 am Opening Statements
W.H. Smith; Madisonville, TN
D.G. Moore; Strasburger & Price, LLP; Dallas, TX

8:45 am Expert Witness (Plaintiff)
V. Baselski; Univ. of Tennessee Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Memphis, TN

9:15 am Interactive Q&A

9:20 am Expert Witness (Defense)
L.D. Gray; TriHealth Clinical Microbiology Lab., Cincinnati, OH

9:50 am Interactive Q&A

10:00 am Summations
W.H. Smith; Madisonville, TN
D.G. Moore; Strasburger & Price, LLP; Dallas, TX

10:15 am Interactive Q&A (Jury decides the case)

Clinical microbiology cases are appearing on the dockets of state and federal courts fairly routinely. Microbiologists are being asked by litigators for both plaintiffs and defendants to serve as experts in these cases. This session has been designed to give microbiologists a chance to see how attorneys and clinical microbiologist interact as the case makes its way through the legal system. Two practicing medical malpractice attorneys and two clinical microbiologists will prepare an infectious disease case for trial. The audience (who will serve as the jury) will be able to see each side depose the other side's expert and will be able to provide feedback at the conclusion regarding how they would vote on the case. This session will be of interest to microbiologists who want to serve as expert witnessess as well as to lab directors and technologists who will be able to see how litigators dissect a laboratory's performance.

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

• Discuss the roles of the attorney and expert in a lawsuit.

• Discuss the steps in preparing a legal case.

• Discuss how a microbiologists can stay out of the courtroom as defendants.

Symposium  

113/D. Host-Pathogen Interactions in Biofilm Infections 

Co-Sponsored By: Division B

8:00 am - 10:30 am

258 B

Conveners:

M. E. Shirtliff;
Univ. of Maryland Dent. Sch., Baltimore, MD.

J. G. Leid;
Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ.

W. E. Swords, Sr.;
Wake Forest Univ. Sch. of Med., Winston-Salem, NC.

Presentations:

8:00 am Phagocyte Interactions with Pseudomonas Biofilms.

J. G. Leid;
Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ.

8:30 am Innate Responses to Haemophilus influenzae Biofilms in Otitis Media.

W. E. Swords, Sr.;
Wake Forest Univ. Sch. of Med., Winston-Salem, NC.

9:00 am Resistance of Mycoplasma Biofilms to Complement.

W. L. Simmons;
Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL.

9:30 am Host Immune Response in Chronic Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infections.

M. E. Shirtliff;
Univ. of Maryland Dent. Sch., Baltimore, MD.

10:00 am Biofilms in Cystic Fibrosis: Clinical Aspects of Microbiology, Host Response, and Patient Impact.

T. G. Liou;
Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

The contribution of bacterial biofilms to chronic infections is now widely appreciated, and includes dental/periodontal infections, bladder infections, otitis media, sinusitis, indwelling medical devices, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and pulmonary infections associated with cystic fibrosis and, possibly, COPD. Because bacteria within these communities often express different surface components and exist in a different metabolic state from planktonic cultures, many of the established paradigms for host-pathogen interactions may not be applicable. The focus of this session will be on recent studies on host responses to biofilm communities. This topic is at the cutting edge of bacterial pathogenesis and host immunity and includes potential topics of interest to a wide variety of attendees.

Symposium  

114/F. New Insights into Fungal-Host Interactions in Health and Disease

8:00 am - 10:30 am

107 A

Conveners:

P. L. Fidel, Jr.;
Louisiana State Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr., New Orleans, LA.

G. B. Huffnagle;
Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch., Ann Arbor, MI.

Presentations:

8:00 am Division F Lecture: Candida albicans as a Commensal: Effects on the Bacterial Microbiota and Immune System.

G. B. Huffnagle;
Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch., Ann Arbor, MI.

9:00 am Dectin-1 in Host Defense against Fungal Pathogens of the Lung: Operating in a Toll Free Zone.

C. Steele;
Univ. of Alabama Sch. of Med., Birmingham, AL.

9:30 am Protective Immunity Against Pulmonary Cryptococcosis.

F. L. Wormley, Jr.;
Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX.

10:00 am Prostaglandins Influence Host and Fungal Biology: Implications for Candida albicans Pathogenesis.

M. C. Noverr;
Wayne State Univ. Sch. of Med., Detroit, MI.

Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumagatus, and pneumocystis carinii are among the most common causes of fungal infections in immunocompetent and/or immuncompromised persons. Candida albicans is both a commensal and a pathogen and influences the immune system in both settings. The division lecture will summarize the effects of C. albicans, the commensal, on the bacterial microbiota and immune system. Another talk on C. albicans will summarize how prostaglandins influence host and fungal biology. Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumagatus, and pneumocystis carinii are respiratory pathogens. A talk on C. neoformans will focus on protective immunity using a vaccine strain constructed with genes of a protective cytokine that allows for a strong localized immune response. Another talk will focus on the role of dectin-1, a beta glucan receptor, in innate host defense against both A. fumagus and P. carinii. Those interested in attending include microbiologists, immunologists, medical mycologists, and infectious disease specialists.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Understand how the commensal form of Candida albicans influences the host bacterial microbiota and immune system.

• Recognize how protaglandins influence host and fungal biology of C. albicans as a pathogen.

• Describe the role the beta glucan receptor, Dectin-1, in innate host defense against A. fumagatus and P. carinii in the lung.

Symposium  

115/H. Getting the Information You Need: Navigating the Evolving Genomics Resource Landscape

8:00 am - 10:30 am

156 A

Conveners:

J. Hu;
Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX.

J. M. Greene;
SRA International, Inc., Rockville, MD.

Presentations:

8:00 am Data in the Bank: mAdb Tools for E. coli Genome Expression Analysis.

W. Zhang;
Illinois Inst. of Technology., Summit, IL.

8:30 am What's True For E. Coli - Enlisting The Community In Ongoing Genome Annotation.

J. Hu;
Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX.

9:00 am Comparative Genomics and Evolution of Brucellae, Rickettsiae and Coxiellae.

J. C. Setubal;
Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA.

9:30 am Horizontal Transfer: Reusable Software for Creating Compatible Bacterial Pathway/Genome Databases.

P. D. Karp;
SRI International, Menlo Park, CA.

10:00 am Bioinformatics for Metagenomics.

R. A. Edwards;
San Diego State Univ., San Diego, CA.

This symposium will present real-world examples of how a variety of bioinformatics applications to support research in microbiology.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• How online resources enable labs to more effectively use microarray studies.

• How the ongoing annotation of genomes will involve the entire ASM community.

• How genomes enhance understanding of the evolution of bacterial pathogens.

• How groups with new genome sequences can build their own genomics resources.

• How metagenomics data will become accessible to the broader scientific community.

Symposium

116/K. The Kid in the Candy Store: The Evolving Physiology
of Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens and Endosymbionts 

8:00 am - 10:30 am

157 A

Convener.

J. P. Audia;
Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL.

Presentations:

8:00 am Apparent Metabolic Redundancies in the Obligate Intracytoplasmic Pathogen, Rickettsia Prowazekii.

J. P. Audia;
Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL.

8:30 am The Biology of Obligate Mutualists of Insects.

S. Aksoy;
Yale Univ., New Haven, CT.

9:00 am Chlamydial Regulation of Nucleoid Condensation: Identification of Small Metabolite and sRNA Regulatory Elements.

N. Grieshaber;
Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

9:30 am Entry of Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae into the Host Cell.

J. J. Martinez;
Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

10:00 am Gene Regulation in Coxiella burnetii: Genomics and Bioinformatics Approaches Towards Understanding Isolate Phenotypic Variation.

J. E. Samuel;
Texas A&M Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr., College Station, TX.

The advent of genomics has provided much insight into the mechanisms by which obligate intracellular organisms have adapted to this fascinating lifestyle. These organisms represent important model systems to study the evolution of the minimal genetic complement required to survive in their particular niche. Many obligate intracellular organisms have evolved to rely on an intricate interplay between transport of key host cell metabolites and de novo biosynthetic pathways to fuel metabolism. In addition, these organisms have evolved strategies to modify their host cell environment to facilitate growth. In some cases these interactions are parasitic in nature and in others, mutualistic. The goal of this symposium is to provide a sampling of the physiology and regulation of five obligate intracellular organisms and highlight the use of bioinformatics in gaining a better understanding of adaptation to growth exclusively in eukaryotic cytosol.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Recognize the importance of genomic and bioinformatics in understanding the physiology and metabolism of obligate intracellular bacteria.

• Discuss physiology and gene regulation as it relates to medically important pathogenic organisms and, in particular, agents classified as relevant to bioterrorism.

• Summarize the different strategies evolved by intracellular organisms to exploit the unique aspects of their particular niche ranging from growth in acidified vacuoles to growth directly in cytosol.

Symposium

117/N. Extant Horizontal Gene Transfer in Microbial
Communities: Advances in Observation, Description, and Prediction, at Individual Level 

Co-Sponsored By: Division M and Division Q

8:00 am - 10:30 am

052 A

Conveners:

B. F. Smets;
Techincal Univ. of Denmark, Kgs-Lyngby, DENMARK.

J. U. Kreft;
Univ. of Birmingham, Birmingham, UNITED KINGDOM.

Presentations:

8:00 am A Single Cell Perspective on clc Genomic Island Transfer in Pseudomonas.

V. S. Sentchilo;
Univ. of Lausanne, Lausanne, SWITZERLAND.

8:30 am Spatially Structured Environments Affect Gene Carriage and Gene Transfer.

A. Lilley;
NERC Ctr. for Ecology and Hydrology, Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM.

9:00 am Extent and Consequences of Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in E. coli Surface Communities.

A. Reisner;
Karl-Franzens-Univ. Graz, Graz, AUSTRIA.

9:30 am A 3-D Individual-Based Model of Plasmid Transfer in Biofilms: The Assessment of Biofilm Invasion by a Plasmid.

L. Lardon;
Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs-Lyngby, DENMARK.

10:00 am Plasmid Transfer and Persistence Modeling on Individual Based Lattice Models.

S. Krone;
Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID.

New approaches are being taking from an experimental (microscopic, molecular,) and computational (individual and particle based models, mass action based models) point of view to study the phenomenon of extant HGT in microbial systems. Especially approaches that are examining cell and plasmid dynamics at the “individual” rather than population- level, have begun to emerge. In addition, suitable modeling platforms (individual based or lattice based models) now explicitly allow us to integrate observations from multiple scales and generate predictions on larger (community) spatial scales, accommodating the recognition of different levels of selection (plasmid/host/clone). The ability to validate these models is unprecedented, and the emergent properties predicted from these individual based HGT model simulations will provide new population level insights in HGT. The purpose of this session is to bring the leading scientists who are studying HGT at the “individual level” together for scientific exchange on the state of the science in the field.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Describe, compare, and contrast the core methodologies that are currently available to study HGT at the individual cell level.

• List the attributes and limitations of the core available methods to study HGT at the individual cell level.

• Recognize and differentiate the possibilities of the main new computational approaches to model HGT at the individual or micro-scale level.

• Debate and question the progress available with the introduced individual based approaches over the “traditional” population averaged approaches.

Symposium  

118/O. Microbial Developmental Regulation:
Control of Diverse Biological Processes

Co-Sponsored By: Division I

8:00 am - 10:30 am

153 A

Conveners:

J. W. Cary;
USDA/ARS, New Orleans, LA.

A. M. Calvo;
Northern Illinois Univ., Dekalb, IL.

Presentations:

8:00 am Extracellular Molecules That Influence Streptomycete Differentiation.

J. Willey;
Hofstra Univ., Hempstead, NY.

8:30 am From Structures to Superstructures: Assembly of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus subtilis Spores.

A. Driks;
Loyola Univ. Med. Ctr., Maywood, IL.

9:00 am VeA Regulates Morphogenesis and Natural Product Biosynthesis in Filamentous Fungi.

A. M. Calvo;
Northern Illinois Univ., Dekalb, IL.

9:30 am Regulation of Invasive Filamentation in Candida albicans.

C. A. Kumamoto;
Tufts Univ., Boston, MA.

10:00 am Identification of Transcriptional Regulatory Networks in the Pathogenic Parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

U. Singh;
Stanford Univ. Sch. of Med., Stanford, CA.

A number of biological processes are intimately connected to an organism’s developmental program. Pathogenicity and survivability of both plant and mammalian pathogens is often dependent on the invading microbe’s ability to undergo differentiation in response to host environmental factors. This is also true of processes such as production of toxins and secondary metabolites in both bacteria and fungi. In many cases the signaling pathways and transcriptional regulatory networks involved in cellular morphogenesis, secondary metabolism and pathogenesis are very complex and the cross-talk between these pathways is often not well understood. This session will provide information on developmental regulatory factors that control such diverse biological processes as secondary metabolism, pathogenesis, and cellular morphogenesis in organisms of medical, industrial, and agricultural importance. The information presented should be of interest to those involved in biotechnology, general and medical microbiology and molecular and biochemical regulation of cellular morphogenesis as it impacts a wide range of biological processes.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Describe a number of regulatory factors involved in cellular development and how these factors impact important biological processes.

• Develop experimental approaches to study the role and regulation of novel developmental and physiological factors in response to environmental stimuli.

• Cite examples of how elucidation of molecular mechanisms controlling developmental processes can provide insights into an organism’s pathogenicity/virulence, developmental program, survivability, and metabolite production.

Symposium

119/P. Foodborne Microbes: Shaping the Host Ecosystems 

Co-Sponsored By: Division Q

8:00 am - 10:30 am

206 A

Conveners:

H. H. Wang;
Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH.

M. W. Carter;
Silliker, Inc., South Holland, IL.

Presentations:

8:00 am The Digestive Microbial Ecosystems.

M. Morrison;
Queensland Bioscience Precinct, St. Lucia, AUSTRALIA.

8:30 am What Are We Eating Everyday?

H. H. Wang;
Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH.

9:00 am Enterococcus Spp: Succeed In Both The Natural and Host Environments.

G. M. Dunny;
Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

9:30 am Deciphering the Social Skills of E. coli within Mixed Bacterial Communities.

J-M. Ghigo;
Inst. Pasteur, Paris, FRANCE.

10:00 am Staphylococcus spp: What Makes a Superbug?

M. Otto;
NIH/NIAID, Hamilton, MT.

Besides pathogens and probiotics, the contribution of the majority of the foodborne commensal microbes to human health is yet to be revealed. This symposium discusses the mechanisms of key commensal bacteria and opportunistic pathogens in shaping the host ecosystems through biofilm formation, quorum sensing, horizontal gene transmission and innate responses. The effects of food processing in changing the microflora associated with foods are also addressed.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Understand the key molecular mechanisms involved in microbial communication and population dynamics.

• Recognize the potential contribution of the food chain in the development of the host digestive microbial ecosystems.

• Develop practical approaches to improve the overall health of the gut ecosystems by proper food processing and handling.

Symposium  

120/Y. Tuberculosis: 21st Century View 

8:00 am - 10:30 am

205 A

Convener:

P. D. Swenson;
Seattle & King County Pub. Hlth. Lab., Seattle, WA.

Presentations:

8:00 am Recent Advances in TB Diagnostic Testing.

M. Salfinger;
Florida Dept. of Hlth., Tallahassee, FL.

8:30 am TB Outbreaks and Laboratory Cross-Contaminations: The Role of Genotyping.

E. P. Desmond;
California Dept. of Hlth. Services, Richmond, CA.

9:00 am TB Laboratory Safety.

M. A. Pentella;
Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.

9:30 am Interferon Gamma Release Assays: Will They Replace the Tuberculin Skin Test?

G. H. Mazurek;
CDC, Atlanta, GA.

10:00 am XDR-TB: a Global Threat.

C. R. Horsburgh, Jr.;
Boston Univ., Boston, MA.

This session will provide a comprehensive overview of recent advances in conventional and molecular methods for detection, isolation, identification, and susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical specimens; the use of tuberculosis (TB) genotyping methods such as spoligotyping, MIRU analysis, and IS6110 RFLP analysis for epidemiologic investigations of outbreaks; biosafety procedures in the TB laboratory; the use of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test or other interferon-gamma release assays versus the tuberculin skin test for detection of M. tuberculosis infection; and the worldwide emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB).

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Describe the various methods for detection, isolation, identification, and susceptibility testing of M. tuberculosis.

• Explain how TB genotyping methods are used to investigate outbreaks

• Understand the biosafety procedures for safely handling M. tuberculosis in the laboratory.

• Explain the advantages and disadvantages of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test for detection of M. tuberculosis infection; and

• Describe the threat of XDR-TB and how to prevent it from becoming a bigger problem.

Special Interest Symposium  

121. Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis: Incidental Human Pathogen or Public Health Threat?

8:00 am - 10:30 am

104 A

Conveners:

M. A. Behr;
Montreal Gen. Hosp., Montreal, QC, CANADA.

C. Nacy;
Sequella, Rockville, MD.

Presentations:

8:00 am MAP Quest: Looking for Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis in Crohn’s Tissue.

M. A. Behr;
McGill Univ., Montreal, QC, CANADA.

8:30 am Title Not Available at Press Time.

V. Kapur;
Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.

9:00 am Veterinary and Food Safety Issues Regarding Paratuberculosis.

M. T. Collins;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

9:30 am Title Not Available at Press Time.

C. Bernstein;
Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CANADA.

10:00 am What Has Human Genetics Taught Us About Mycobacterial Diseases?

E. Schurr;
Montreal Gen. Hosp., Montreal, QC, CANADA.

Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) is a soil microorganism and the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic and progressive enteric infection considered to be one of the most serious diseases affecting cattle and other domestic and wild animals, including sheep, goats, elk, and primates. Mounting evidence supports a role for MAP as an etiologic agent (although it may be one of several) of Crohn’s disease, a chronic relapsing inflammatory human disease of the gut. The American Academy of Microbiology convened a session on MAP in 2007. This session will report on the conclusions of that colloquium, as well as discuss research that is needed in this area.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Describe Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP).

• Discuss the role that it is believed MAP plays in Crohn’s disease.

• Demonstrate where research is needed and what advances could be made with further investigation.

Special Interest Symposium  

122. The Real Deal on Handwashing

8:00 am - 10:30 am

252 A

Convener:

J. A. Daly;
Primary Children's Med. Ctr., Salt Lake City, UT.

Presentations:

8:00 am Guidelines for Hand Hygiene - The Science.

A. Robinson;
Sacred Heart Med. Ctr., Spokane, WA.

8:30 am The Miracle of the Handwashing Intervention in Disease Prevention - Do We Use It?

J. A. Daly;
Primary Children's Med. Ctr., Salt Lake City, UT.

9:00 am What the Hospital Handwashing Campaigns/Surveys are Telling Us?

A. J. Blaschke;
Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

9:30 am Intervention in Disease Prevention in Developing Countries.

B. M. Madison;
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Lusaka, ZAMBIA.

Healthcare specialists generally cite handwashing as the single most effective way to prevent the transmission of disease.  This is one healthcare infection control measure that has successfully spread throughout the community.  In the healthcare setting, handwashing can prevent potentially fatal infections from spreading from patient to patient, and from patient to healthcare worker and vice-versa.  In the home, it can prevent infectious diseases such as diarrhea and hepatitis A from spreading from family member to family member and, sometimes, throughout a community.  The basic rule in the hospital is wash your hands between patients.  In the home, it’s wash them before preparing food, after changing diapers, and after using the bathroom.  Handwashing is unquestioned today as the most important tool in the healthcare worker’s arsenal for preventing infection.  The five common household scenarios in which diease-causing germs can be transmitted by contaminated hands include hands to food, infected infant to hands to other children, foods to hands to food, nose, mouth or eyes to hands to others and food to hands to infants.  Handwashing can prevent the transfer of germs in all five of these scenarios.  As the ASM’s clean hands campaign suggests (www.washup.org), vigorous scrubbing with soapy wawter for at least 15 seconds is all that is needed.  This symposium will examine the science of hand hygiene, the collaboration and leadership of the ASM in handwashing educational campaigns and surveys, the hospital handwashing challenges concerning disease intervention and finally the progress on disease prevention using handwashing in developing countries.


Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Describe the science of handwashing.

• Recognize good, appropriate public health educational campaigns and survey strategies on handwashing.

• Recommend hospital handwashing campaigns and surveys that work.

• Explain the intervention in disease prevention that handwashing provides in developing countries.

Special Interest Symposium

123. Career Preparation in Microbiology -
Non-Academic Career Tracks 

8:00 am - 10:30 am

258 A

Convener:

N. Baker;
Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH.

Presentations:

8:00 am Careers at the FDA.

T. J. Merkel;
FDA/CBER, Bethesda, MD.

8:30 am Careers at the CDC.

C. E. Lucas;
CDC, Atlanta, GA.

9:00 am Careers in Start up Business.

C. R. Icenhour;
Phthisis Diagnostics, Charlottesville, VA.

9:30 am Careers in Biodefense.

A. M. Bissing;
Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD.

This session is targeted to faculty involved with advising undergraduate and graduate students about non-academic career opportunities in Microbiology, and graduate and postdoctoral students seeking career information. A panel of experts representing industry and government has been assembled to answer questions regarding employment issues in each sector. Topics may include the current employment outlook, what to expect as an employee, balancing a career and family life, and how to prepare for the desired position. The format will be a Roundtable discussion with each panel member providing a brief introduction of their background and position followed by an open discussion with the audience

Poster Sessions

124/A. Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Resistance - I

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

A-026  The YcgE Protein of Escherichia coli is Involved in the Temperature Dependent Regulation of OmpF.

V. Duval1, H. Nicoloff2, S. Levy1;
1Tufts Univ. Sch. of Med., Boston, MA, 2The Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA.

A-027  Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the Major Multidrug Efflux Pump, AcrB, of Escherichia coli Isolated from Disparate Animal Reservoirs.

L. B. Mullis, C. A. Elkins;
US FDA, Natl. Ctr. for Toxicological Res., Jefferson, AR.

A-028  High-Level Amoxicillin-Resistance Mediated by b-Lactamase in Clinical Isolate of Helicobacter pylori.

L-L. Chang1, Y-S. Tseng1, C-H. Kuo2, D-C. Wu2;
1Kaohsiung Med. Univ., Kaohsiung, TAIWAN, 2Kaohsiung Med. Univ. Hosp., Kaohsiung, TAIWAN.

A-029  Inactivation of nikD Affects the Activity and Expression of MarA in Escherichia coli.

C. Ruiz Rueda, S. B. Levy;
Tufts Univ. Sch. of Med., Boston, MA.

A-030  Response of the MRSA Strain N315DIP to Daptomycin: Why Are Non-Susceptible Clones Emerging?

I. L. B. C. Camargo, L. Cui, H-M. Neoh, K. Hiramatsu;
Juntendo Univ., Tokyo, JAPAN.

A-031  Role of the HefA Efflux System in Antimicrobial Resistance of Helicobacter hepaticus.

C. Belzer1, S. Breijer1, J. G. Kusters1, E. J. Kuipers1, A. H. M. van Vliet2,1;
1Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, THE NETHERLANDS, 2Inst. of Food Res., Norwich, UNITED KINGDOM.

A-032  Heterogeneity of Tn1546 among VanA-type VRE Isolates of Enterococcus faecium.

K. Sung, S. A. Khan, M. S. Nawaz;
US FDA, NCTR, Jefferson, AR.

A-033  Mechanism of How a Bacterial Pathogen Develops Resistance/Tolerance to Host Cationic Antimicrobial Pepetides.

J. Cummins1, C. Baysse2, F. Reen1, F. O' Gara1;
1Univ. Coll., Cork, IRELAND, 2Rennes Univ., Rennes, FRANCE.

A-034  Regulation Mechanism of the Staphylococcus aureus NorA Multidrug Efflux Pump by MgrA and NorG Proteins.

Q. Truong-Bolduc1,2, Y. Ding1,2, D. C. Hooper1,2;
1Massachusetts General Hosp., Boston, MA, 2Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA.

A-035  Differences in Resistance Mechanisms between Levofloxacin (LVX)-Susceptible / Ciprofloxacin (CIP)-Resistant Proteus mirabilis and Isolates Resistant to Both Drugs.

T. A. Davies1, Y. C. Yee2, B. Morrow1, A. Evangelista2;
1Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Res. & Dev. LLC, Raritan, NJ, 2Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Raritan, NJ.

A-036  Flow Cytometric Analysis of Rhodamine 6G Accumulation in Different Candida Species.

S-H. Kim1, C-J. Moon1, J-H. Shin2, M-G. Shin1, S-P. Suh3, D-W. Ryang3;
1Chonnam Natl. Univ. Hwasun Hosp., Hwasun-gun, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Chonnam Natl. Univ. Hwasun Hosp., Gwangju, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 3Chonnam Natl. Univ. Hosp., Gwangju, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

A-037  Plasmid Analysis of AmpC b-Lactamase-Bearing Plasmids from Escherichia coli in Canadian Intensive Care Units (ICUs).

P. J. Baudry1, K. Nichol2, M. DeCorby1, L. Mataseje1, P. Lagace-Wiens1,2, J. A. Karlowsky2, D. J. Hoban1,2, G. G. Zhanel1, M. R. Mulvey1,3;
1Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CANADA, 2Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Winnipeg, MB, CANADA, 3Natl. Microbiology Lab., Winnipeg, MB, CANADA.

A-038  Metronidazole Resistance Development Is Coupled with Down-Regulation of an Oxygen-Insensitive NAD(P)H Nitroreductase Encoding Gene (rdxA) in Helicobacter pylori.

D. H. Kwon1, J. Wu2, H. Lu2, D. Y. Graham2;
1Long Island Univ., Brooklyn, NY, 2VA Med. Ctr. of Baylor Coll. of Med., Houston, TX.

A-039  Effect of MexXY Overexpression on Ceftobiprole Susceptibility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

S. M. Crespo-Carbone, T. Davies, B. Foleno, B. Morrow, A. M. Queenan, K. Bush, E. Z. Baum;
Johnson & Johnson PRD, LLC, Raritan, NJ.

A-040  Involvement of a Novel Efflux System in Biofilm-Specific Resistance to Antibiotics.

L. Zhang, T-F. Mah;
Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, CANADA.

A-041  Identifying Escherichia coli Multidrug Resistance Genes by Transposon Mutagenesis.

M. Duo, S. Hou, D. Ren;
Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY.

A-042  Genetic Basis of Multi-Resistance in Nosocomial Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii.

J. K. Mak1, M-J. Kim1, J. Pham2, J. Tapsall2, P. A. White1;
1Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney, AUSTRALIA, 2Prince of Wales Hosp., Sydney, AUSTRALIA.

A-043  Novel Tetracycline Determinant Identified in Subsurface Bacteria.

M. G. Brown, E. H. Mitchell, D. L. Balkwill;
Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL.

A-044  Prevalence and Molecular Characterization of Macrolide Resistant S. pneumoniae in Canadian Intensive Care Units: Results Obtained During 2005 and 2006 Canadian Intensive Care Unit Surveillance Study (CAN-ICU).

A. K. Wierzbowski1, K. Nichol2, M. Decorby1, G. G. Zhanel1, D. J. Hoban1,2;
1Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CANADA, 2Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Winnipeg, MB, CANADA.

A-045  Elucidating the Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR Regulon.

D. Balasubramanian1, L. Schneper1, O. Caille1, M. Merighi2, A. Brencic2, R. Smith2, E. Zeng1, S. Lory2, G. Narasimhan1, K. Mathee1;
1Florida Intl. Univ., Miami, FL, 2Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA.

A-046  Dissemination of Bacitracin Resistance in Enterococcal Isolates.

R. Matos, V. V. Pinto, M. S. Lopes;
ITQB/IBET, Oeiras, PORTUGAL.

A-047  Detection of cfr rRNA Methyltransferases among Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci (CoNS) Recovered from Human Infections.

T. R. Fritsche, M. Castanheira, R. E. Mendes, R. N. Jones, L. M. Deshpande;
JMI Lab., North Liberty, IA.

A-048  Identification and Characterization of a Novel ABC Multidrug Efflux Pump, SmrA, in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

A. Al-Hamad, J. Burnie, M. Upton;
Univ. of Manchester, Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM.

 

125/B. Toxins - II

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

B-146  Receptor Recognition by Shiga Toxin 2 Variants.

C. Fuller-Schaefer, S. S. Iyer, A. A. Weiss;
Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.

B-147  The Enterococcus Faecalis Membrane-Embedded Metalloprotease, CylI, Inactivates Cytolysin Toxin by Cleavage of the Large Toxin Subunit, CylLL.

S. M. McBride, K. Carniol, A. Spoering, M. Gilmore;
Schepens Eye Res. Inst., Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA.

B-148  The Role of PFO D4 L1-3 Loops in Recognition of Cholesterol-Rich Membranes and Pore Formation.

A. Farrand, R. Tweten;
Oklahoma City Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Oklahoma City, OK.

B-149  The Role of the Undecapeptide in the Pore-Forming Mechanism of the Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysins.

K. J. Dowd, E. M. Hotze, R. K. Tweten;
Univ. of Oklahoma Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Oklahoma City, OK.

B-150  Co-Expression of Ovine CD14 with LFA-1 or Mac-1 Does not Enhance Mannheimia haemolytica Leukotoxin-Induced Cytotoxicity.

R. P. Dassanayake, P. K. Lawrence, S. Shanthalingam, W. C. Davis, W. J. Foreyt, S. Srikumaran;
Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA.

B-151  The Role of RTX Toxins in Virulence of Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the Causal Agent of Stewart’s Wilt of Corn.

C. Roper, S. von Bodman;
Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, Storrs, CT.

B-152  Plasma Membrane Sphingomyelin Functions as a Novel Raft Receptor for the Helicobacter pylori VacA.

V. R. Gupta1, H. K. Patel1, S. R. Blanke1,2;
1Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2Inst. for Genomic Biology, Urbana, IL.

B-153  Heat-Labile Enterotoxin Secretion, Lipopolysaccharide Association, and Outer Membrane Vesicle Release.

B. Mudrak, A. J. McBroom, H. F. Staats, M. J. Kuehn;
Duke Univ., Durham, NC.

B-154  Exchange of Differential Amino Acids within a Functionally Important Region of CNF1 to CNF2, Alters Toxin Activity and Recognition by the CNF1-specific Monoclonal Antibody, NG8.

K. K. Grande1, S. B. Rasmussen1, K. C. Meysick2, A. D. O'Brien1;
1USUHS, Rockville, MD, 2FDA/CBER, Bethesda, MD.

B-155  Identifying the Molecular Basis of Cytolethal Distending Toxin Binding to Mammalian Cells.

A. Gargi1, M. G. Prouty1, A. Eshraghi2, F. J. Maldonado2, K. A. Bradley2, S. R. Blanke1;
1Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA.

B-156  Growth, Toxin Production and Sporulation of Hypervirulent Clostridium difficile Strains.

M. Merrigan1, A. Venugopal1, D. Gerding2, G. Vedantam1,2;
1Loyola Univ. Maywood, IL, 2Hines VA Hosp., Hines, IL.

B-157  Antibiotics with High Therapeutic Potential for the Treatment of E. coli O157:H7 Include Transcription and Translation Inhibitors.

C. McGannon, A. Weiss;
Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.

B-158  A Phospholipase/Hemolysin of Vibrio vulnificus has no Role in Virulence in a Mouse Model.

J. L. Joseph, P. A. Gulig;
Univ. of Florida Coll. of Med., Gainesville, FL.

B-159  Intravenous Shiga toxin 2 Promotes Enteritis and Renal Injury Characterized by Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Infiltration and Thrombosis in Dutch Belted Rabbits.

A. Garcia1, R. P. Marini1, J. L. Catalfamo2, K. A. Knox1, D. B. Schauer1, A. B. Rogers1, J. G. Fox1;
1Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

B-160  Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 (TSST-1) Amino Acid Residues Required for Interaction with Human Vaginal Epithelial Cells (HVECs).

A. J. Brosnahan, P. M. Schlievert, M. M. Schaefers, M. L. Peterson;
Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

B-161  Role of Toxins in Microvascular Perfusion Deficits Mediated by Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium septicum.

M. J. Hickey, R. Y. Q. Kwan, M. M. Awad, C. L. Kennedy, L. Young, L. M. Cordner, D. Lyras, J. J. Emmins, J. I. Rood;
Monash Univ., Clayton, AUSTRALIA.

B-162  Effect of STb Toxin Produced by Escherichia coli on the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Cell Viability.

C. Gonçalves, J. D. Dubreuil;
Univ. de Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CANADA.

B-163  Detection of Escherichia coli STb Enterotoxin Variant from Diseased Pigs.

C. Taillon, E. Nadeau, M. Mourez, J. D. Dubreuil;
Univ. de Montreal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CANADA.

B-164  Assembly of Helicobacter pylori VacA into Large Oligomeric Structures Requires Amino Acid Sequences within the p33 Domain.

C. Gonzalez-Rivera1, M. S. McClain1, T. L. Cover2;
1Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN, 2Vanderbilt Univ. and VAMC, Nashville, TN.

B-165  Evaluation of Bovine Gene Response to Fescue Toxicosis via Expression Microarrays.

D. D. Tanaree1, J. Duringer1, D. Bohnert2, A. M. Craig1;
1Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR, 2Eastern Oregon Agricultural Res. Ctr., Oregon State Univ., Burns, OR.

 

126/B. Regulation of Virulence Determinants of Pathogenic Microorganisms - III

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

B-166  Regulation of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Fim Gene Expression by Acid Tolerance Gene Products.

W. R. Schwan1, J. Luedtke1, A. Wheaton1, M. Cheng1, J. W. Foster2, R. Wolchak1;
1Univ. Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI, 2Univ. South Alabama Coll. of Med., Mobile, AL.

B-167  A Eukaryotic-Type Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase and its Cognate Phosphatase are Required for Virulence in Streptococcus mutans.

H. A. Hussain1, J. R. van der Ploeg2, E. Allan1;
1Univ. Coll., London, UNITED KINGDOM, 2Univ. of Zurich, Zurich, SWITZERLAND.

B-168  Differential Function of a Campylobacter jejuni Amino Acid ABC Transporter in Bacterial stress Regulation and Cellular Infection.

A. E. Lin1, K. Krastel2, D. G. Cvitkovitch2, E. C. Gaynor1;
1Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CANADA, 2Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CANADA.

B-169  PerR Confers Resistance to Phagocytic Killing and Enhances Pharyngeal Colonization of Group A Streptococcus.

I. Gryllos1,2, R. Grifantini3, A. Colaprico3, M. E. Cary4, A. Hakansson1,2, D. W. Carey4, M. Suarez-Chavez4, L. A. Kalish1,2, P. D. Mitchell1, G. L. White4, M. R. Wessels1,2;
1Children's Hosp., Boston, MA, 2Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA, 3Novartis Vaccines & Diagnostics, Siena, ITALY, 4Oklahoma Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Oklahoma City, OK

B-170  Induction of Group A Streptococcus Virulence by a Human Antimicrobial Peptide.

I. Gryllos1,2, M-F. Cheng3, H. Chung2, R. Bolcome III2, W. Lu4, R. I. Lehrer5, M. R. Wessels1,2;
1Children's Hosp., Boston, MA, 2Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA, 3Veterans Gen. Hosp.-Kaohsiung, Natl. Yang-Ming Univ., Taipei, TAIWAN, 4Inst. of Human Virology, Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, 5David Geffen Sch. of Med., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA.

B-171  The Virulence Regulator Sae of Staphylococcus aureus: Promoter Activities and Response to Phagocytosis-Related Signals.

T. Geiger, C. Goerke, M. Mainiero, C. Wolz;
Med. Microbiology and Hygiene, Tübingen, GERMANY.

B-172  A Global Effect of the PmrAB Two Component System of Legionella pneumophila on Expression of Genes Required for Modulation of Cellular Processes.

S. M. Al Khodor1, S. M. Kalachikov2, C. T. Price1, Y. Abu Kwaik1;
1Univ. of Louisville, Louisville, KY, 2Columbia Univ., New York City, NY.

B-173  The Effects of Bile and Temperature on Virulence Factor Expression in Vibrio cholerae.

M. Bellair, J. Withey;
Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI.

B-174  Integrated Regulation of Virulence Factors during Systemic Infection of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

H. Yoon1, S. Porwollik2, M. McClelland2, J. McDermott3, F. Heffron1;
1Oregon Hlth. & Sci. Univ., Portland, OR, 2Sidney Kimmel Cancer Ctr., San Diego, CA, 3Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA.

B-175  Molecular Characterization of PapX, a P Fimbrial-Encoded Inhibitor of Motility in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

A. N. Simms, H. L. T. Mobley;
Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch., Ann Arbor, MI.

B-176  Quorum Sensing E. coli Regulators E, F, and G (QseEFG): a Three Component System Important for Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) Pathogenesis.

N. C. Reading1, A. G. Torres2, K. Yamamoto3, V. Sperandio1;
1Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr., Dallas, TX, 2Univ. of Texas Med. Branch, Galveston, TX, 3Kinki Univ., Nakamachi, Nara, JAPAN.

B-177  Inhibition of Virulence by the Interruption of Bacterial Signaling Pathways.

D. A. Rasko1, C. G. Moreira1, S. Flickinger1, D. Li1, J. Ritchie2, M. Waldor2, N. Williams1, R. Taussig1, C. Mischnoff1, M. Roth1, D. T. Hughes1, J. F. Huntley1, J. R. Falck1, V. Sperandio1;
1Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr., Dallas, TX, 2Channing Lab., Brigham and Women’s Hosp., Harvard Univ., Boston, MA.

B-178  A Subset of Genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae Responds to the Type and Quantity of Iron Sources Available in Vivo.

R. Gupta1, E. Swiatlo2;
1Univ. of Mississippi Med. Ctr., Jackson, MS, 2Va Med. Ctr., Jackson, MS.

B-179  Phenotypic Microarrays and In Vivo Transcriptome Analysis Reveal Molecular and Regulatory Events Underlying Niche-Adaptation of M1T1 S. pyogenes.

R. K. Aziz1,2, W. L. Taylor1, R. Kansal1, M. Kubal3, S. L. Rowe1, Y. Su1, G. S. Chhatwal4, M. J. Walker5, M. Kotb1;
1Univ. of Tennessee Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Memphis, TN, 2Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo Univ., Cairo, EGYPT, 3Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 4Helmholtz Ctr. for Infection Res., Braunschweig, GERMANY, 5Sch. of Biological Sci., Univ. of Wollongong, Wollongong, AUSTRALIA.

B-180  PhoB Negatively Regulates Virulence Gene Expression in Vibrio cholerae.

J. Pratt1, A. Camilli1,2;
1Tufts Univ. Sch. of Med., Boston, MA, 2Howard Hughes Med. Inst., Boston, MA.

B-181  Identification and Characterization of QseD a Putative LysR Like Regulator of Virulence, Motility, and Genome and Cellular Stability in Enterohemorrhagic E. coli.

B. J. Habdas;
Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr., Dallas, TX.

B-182  Identification and Characterization of the Zinc Uptake Regulator (Zur) in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

K. F. Smith1, F. M. Jobling2, R. K. Holmes2, D. M. Oram1;
1Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, 2Univ. of Colorado Denver Sch. of Med., Aurora, CO.

B-183  Regulation of Fatty Acid Modifying Enzyme Activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

T. Lu, M. A. McGuire;
Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID.

B-184  The OmpR Subfamily Response Regulator ChxR from Chlamydia trachomatis Forms Homo-Dimers in vivo and Requires Receiver-Effector Domain Interaction for DNA-Binding.

J. Hickey;
Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS.

B-185  A cis-Acting DNA Element Upstream of the Pilin Expression Locus Is Required for Pilin Antigenic Variation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

L. A. Cahoon, H. S. Seifert;
Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL.

B-186  Transcriptional Analysis of the ecp Operon of Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli.

V. I. Martínez-Santos1, A. L. Erdem2, J. A. Girón2, J. L. Puente1;
1Inst. de Biotecnología, U.N.A.M., Cuernavaca, MEXICO, 2Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

B-187  HilD Counteracts the Repression Exerted by H-NS on the ssrAB Operon to Induce Expression of the SPI-2 Regulon in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

L. C. Martinez, J. L. Puente, V. H. Bustamante;
Inst. de Biotecnología, Cuernavaca, Morelos, MEXICO.

B-188  Effect of LPS on Gb3 Expression in Murine Tissues.

G. Kolling, F. Obata, L. Gross, T. Obrig;
Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

B-189  Investigating Interactions between GI Tract Signaling Molecules on Escherichia coli O157:H7 Chemotaxis Using a Novel Microfluidic Chemotaxis Model.

D. Englert, F. Senocak, J. Kim, T. K. Wood, A. Jayaraman;
Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX.

B-190  Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlgZ Utilizes a Biofilm Specific Mechanism to Regulate Hydrogen Cyanide.

W. L. Cody, Jr.1, C. L. Prichett1, A. Frisk2, M. Wolfgang3, M. J. Schurr1;
1Univ. of Colorado, Aurora, CO, 2Tulane Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr., New Orleans, LA, 3Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.

B-191  ‘Form Variation’ of the O12 Antigen Is Critical for Persistence of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in the Murine Intestine.

L. Bogomolnaya1, C. Santiviago2, A. Bugbee1, H-J. Yang1, A. J. Baumler3, H. L. Andrews-Polymenis1;
1Texas A&M Univ. System Hlth. Sci. Ctr., College Station, TX, 2Univ. de Chile, Santiago, CHILE, 3Univ. of California, Davis, CA.

 

127/B. Genetic Organization of Pathogens

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

B-192  Molecular and Phylogenetic Characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Carrying Pathogenicity Markers for Thermostable Direct Hemolysin (tdh), tdh-Related Hemolysin, and Type Three Secretion Systems 1 and 2.

C. N. Johnson, N. F. Noriea, III, D. J. Grimes;
Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Ocean Springs, MS.

B-193  Virulence and Plasmid Profile of O113:H21 Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Different Sources in Brazil.

L. F. Santos1, K. Irino2, T. M. I. Vaz2, R. M. Silva1, B. E. C. Guth1;
1Univ. Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, BRAZIL, 2Inst. Adolfo Lutz, São Paulo, BRAZIL.

B-194  Genomic Islands of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Contribute to Virulence.

A. L. Lloyd, T. A. Markyvech, H. L. T. Mobley;
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

B-195  Evaluation of Virulence Plasmid Genetic Markers in Bacillus anthracis.

K. J. Stupec, S. W. Jones, M. L. McKee;
BEI Resources, ATCC, Manassas, VA.

B-196  Prophage Sequences Are more Frequently Present in Cag PAI Negative than Cag PAI Positive Isolates of Helicobacter pylori.

J. B. Miller, Jr.1, K. R. Ridgway1, A. S. Gayek1, X. Liu1, K. Dondeti1, H. J. Schwab1, D. M. Theurer1, R. M. Peek, Jr2, M. H. Forsyth1;
1Coll. of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 2Vanderbilt Univ. Med. Ctr./VAMC, Nashville, TN.

B-197  Virulence Gene Diversity among Group B Streptococcal Lineages.

A. C. Springman, S. Manning, D. Lacher, G. Wu, N. Milton, H. Davies, T. Whittam;
Michigan State Univ., E. Lansing, MI.

B-198  Arrangement of Mannitol Genes as an Indicator of Virulence in C-Genotype Strains of Vibrio vulnificus.

B. A. Froelich, J. D. Oliver;
Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC.

B-199  Sequence Analysis of Bordetella avium Strains Lacking Potential Virulence Factors.

K. Smith1, L. Woodard1, N. Beach1, C. Cummings2, L. Temple1;
1James Madison Univ., Harrisonburg, VA, 2Stanford Univ. Sch. of Med. and VA Palo Alto Hlth. Care System, Palo Alto, CA.

B-200  Complete Genome Sequence of Finegoldia magna, an Opportunistic Pathogen in Gram-Positive Anaerobic Cocci.

T. Goto1, A. Yamashita2, H. Hirakawa3, M. Matsutani3, K. Ohshima2,4, H. Toh2,5, K. Todo1, K. Miyamoto1, S. Kuhara3, M. Hattori2,4,5, T. Shimizu6, S. Akimoto1;
1Wakayama Med. Univ., Wakayama, JAPAN, 2Kitasato Univ., Kanagawa, JAPAN, 3Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka, JAPAN, 4Univ. of Tokyo, Chiba, JAPAN, 5RIKEN Genomic Sci. Ctr., Kanagawa, JAPAN, 6Kanazawa Univ., Ishikawa, JAPAN.

B-201  Differences in the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement (LEE) Pathogenicity Island of the Closely Related Escherichia coli Serotypes O157:H7, O55:H7 and O145:NM.

Y. Zhang, G. Golds, S. J. John, C. Laing, E. Taboada, V. P. J. Gannon;
Pub. Hlth. Agency of Canada, Lethbridge, AB, CANADA.

B-202  Cloning, Genomic Organization and Expression of secA2 gene in Listeria species.

K. K. Mishra, K. M. Burkholder, S. Medina-Maldonado, A. K. Bhunia;
Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN.

B-203  Whole Genome Analysis of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. Eequisimilis GGS_124.

T. Miyoshi-Akiyama1, Y. Shimomura1, S. Murayama2, K. Ubukata2, J. Yagi3, T. Kirikae1;
1Intl. Med. Ctr. of Japan, Tokyo, JAPAN, 2Kitasato Inst. for Life Sci., Tokyo, JAPAN, 3Tokyo Women's Med. Univ., Tokyo, JAPAN.

B-204  Genetic Plasticity in Chlamydia pneumoniae pmpG6 Gene.

J. A. Carrasco Lopez, C. Tan, P. M. Bavoil;
Univ. of Maryland Dent. Sch., Baltimore, MD.

B-205  Interspecies Gene Transfer within Strains of the Genus Chlamydia.

R. J. Suchland1, K. M. Sandoz2, D. D. Rockey2, W. E. Stamm1;
1Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR.

B-206  Correlation between the Presence of pet, pic and sat Genes and their Expression in Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Children with and without Diarrhea.

U. Hernandez, Sr.1, J. Lama-Plata1, M. Solano1, A. Navarro1, T. Sainz2, C. González2, C. Eslava1;
1Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, MEXICO, 2Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico, MEXICO.

B-207  Diffusion of the Alpha-like Protein Family Genes among Streptococci: Mobilization Mediated by Circular Forms?

R. Creti1, M. Imperi1, M. Pataracchia1, F. Cardona2, L. Pagani3, L. Baldassarri1;
1Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, ITALY, 2Univ. La Sapienza, Rome, ITALY, 3Univ. of Pavia, Rome, ITALY.

B-208  Comparison of Phylogenetic Groups and Virulence Factors in a Collection of ESBL-Producing and AmpC-Producing Escherichia coli from Canadian Intensive Care Units.

P. J. Baudry1, K. Nichol2, M. DeCorby1, P. Lagace-Wiens1,2, J. A. Karlowsky2, G. G. Zhanel1, D. J. Hoban1,2;
1Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CANADA, 2Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Winnipeg, MB, CANADA.

B-209  DNA Microarray Analysis of Bacterial Pathogens.

A. C. Jacobs1, J. Morrison1, S. Welander1, A. Adibi2, C. Lee3, T. T. Luong3, E. Skaar4, G. Pishchany4, P. Fey1, P. Dunman1;
1Univ. of Nebraska Med. Ctr., Omaha, NE, 2Hampton Univ., Hampton, VA, 3Univ. of Arkansas for Med. Sci., Little Rock, AR, 4Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN.

B-210  Genomic Comparison of Urease-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Catheterized Patients Presenting with Urinary Tract Infection.

E. L. Flannery1, H. L. T. Mobley2;
1Sch. of Pub. Hlth., Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch., Ann Arbor, MI.

 

128/B. Microbial Interactions with Phagocytes

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

B-211  The Emerging Human Pathogen Photorhabdus asymbiotica Induces Apoptosis through Caspase 3 Pathway in THP1 cells.

S. C. P. Costa, G. Courties, J. Dornand, M. Brehelin, R. Zumbihl;
Univ. de Montpellier II, Montpellier, FRANCE.

B-212  A Chemical Genetic Approach to Dissecting Virulence Pathways in M. tuberculosis.

S. A. Stanley, J. Aquadro, M. Vokes, A. Carpenter, D. Hung;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

B-213  Role of Syntaxins in the Maturation Process of Salmonella Containing Phagosomes.

R. Madan, S. Parashuraman, A. Mukhopadhyay;
Natl. Inst. of Immunology, New Delhi, INDIA.

B-214  Coordinated Host Responses during Pyroptosis: Caspase-1-Dependent Lysosome Exocytosis and Inflammatory Cytokine Maturation.

T. Bergsbaken, S. L. Fink, B. T. Cookson;
Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA.

B-215  The Intracellular Trafficking of Yersinia pestis Virulence (V) Antigen during Macrophage Infection by the TTSS-Independent Mechanism.

T. L. DiMezzo, G. T. Ruthel, S. L. Welkos;
USAMRIID, Frederick, MD.

B-216  Caspase-1 Activation in Macrophages Infected with Yersinia pestis KIM Requires the Type III Secretion System Effector YopJ.

S. Lilo, Y. Zheng, J. B. Bliska;
State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY.

B-217  Development of In Vitro Assays to Identify Common Modes of Interaction of the Pathogens Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis with Macrophages as a Model for In Vivo Pathogenesis.

A. Jenkins, C. Cote, S. Welkos;
USAMRIID, Frederick, MD.

B-218  OFS Mediates Protection of Streptococcus suis Against Phagocytosis by Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils.

G. Ramachandran, P. Valentin-Weigand, C. G. Baums;
Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, GERMANY.

B-219  Control of Listeria monocytogenes Infection by Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells.

M. M. Westcott1, J. E. Amis2, E. M. Hiltbold1;
1Wake Forest Univ. Sch. of Med., Winston-Salem, NC, 2Guilford Coll., Greensboro, NC.

B-220  Differential Modulation of Phagocytic Cell Functions by the Burkholderia cepacia Complex: Burkholderia cenocepacia but not Burkholderia multivorans Disrupts Maturation and Induces Necrosis in Human Dendritic Cells.

K. L. MacDonald, D. P. Speert;
Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CANADA.

B-221  Intracellular Salmonella Induce Apoptosis of Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages through Both Intrinsic and Extrinsic Pathways.

H-L. Chen, W-C. Tang, C-H. Chiu;
Chang Gung Children’s Hosp., Chang Gung Univ. Coll. of Med., Taoyuan, TAIWAN.

B-222  Mechanism and Gene Regulation of Streptococcus mutans Involved in the Resistance to Hydrogen Peroxide and Phagocytic Killing.

P-M. Chen1, H-C. Chen1, C-T. Ho1, C-J. Jung1, H-T. Lien1, J-Y. Chen2, J-S. Chia1;
1Coll. of Med., National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, TAIWAN, 2National Hlth. Res. Inst., Miaoli County, TAIWAN.

B-223  Accelerated Macrophage Apoptosis Induced by Group A Streptococcus.

A. M. Timmer1, J. C. Timmer2, M. A. Pence1, L-C. Hsu1, M. Karin1, G. S. Salvesen2, V. Nizet1;
1Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA, 2Burnham Inst. for Med. Res., La Jolla, CA.

B-224  Macrophages, Dendritic Cells and Neutrophils Are the Primarily Targets of YopH During Oral Infection with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

E. A. Durand, C. Castillo, J. Mecsas;
Tufts Univ., Boston, MA.

B-225  The Activation of NF-B Pathway Is Associated with Anthrax Lethal Toxin Induced Apoptosis of Bovine Macrophage.

X. Liang1, C. Gao2, M. Rutherford1, Y. Ji1;
1Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 2Van Andel Res. Inst., Grand Rapids, MI.

B-226  Neisseria meningitidis Depletes Endogenous S-Nitrosothiol in Activated Macrophages.

J. R. Laver, T. M. Stevanin, M. E. Lee, R. C. Read;
Univ. of Sheffield, Sheffield, UNITED KINGDOM.

B-227  Differential Expression of Scavenger Receptors in Murine Peritoneal Macrophages Infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis in vitro.

M. T. Baer, F. C. Gibson, III;
Boston Univ. Med. Ctr., Boston, MA.

B-228  Role of a Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase (SodC) of Francisella tularensis in Intramacrophage Survival, Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Virulence in Mice.

C. S. Bakshi, M. Mahawar, D. W. Metzger;
Albany Med. Coll., Albany, NY.

B-229  Cellular and Immunological Responses of Alveolar Macrophages to Mycobacterium immunogenum, a Species Associated with Occupational Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

H. Bangar, J. S. Yadav;
Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.

B-230  ZAK is a Signaling Intermediary for Shiga Toxin Stimulated Cytokine Expression in Macrophage-Like Cells in vitro.

D. M. Jandhyala, K. Poutsiaka, C. M. Thorpe;
Tufts-New England Med. Ctr., Boston, MA.

B-231  Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin Suppresses Human Macrophage Phagocytosis and Cytoskeletal Remodeling via the PKA and Epac Pathways.

L. A. Yeager, A. K. Chopra, J. W. Peterson;
Univ. of Texas Med. Branch, Galveston, TX.

B-232  Development of a Novel In vivo Assay to Examine Smoke- and Alcohol-Induced Alterations in Bacterial Uptake by Alveolar Macrophages.

A. M. Pitz, M. J. Gentry-Nielsen;
Creighton Univ., Omaha, NE.

B-233  Tyrosine Phosphorylation of the Haemophilus ducreyi LspA Proteins.

K. Deng, J. R. Mock, N. S. C. van Oers, E. J. Hansen;
Univ. of Texas, Southwestern Med. Ctr., Dallas, TX.

B-234  Mechanisms of Interferon-Induced Resistance to Staphylococcal Alpha-Toxin.

T. O. Yarovinsky1, P. J. Sims2, M. Husmann3;
1Yale Univ., New Haven, CT, 2Univ. of Rochester Med. Ctr., Rochester, NY, 3Inst. of Med. Microbiology and Hygiene, Johannes Gutenberg-Univ. Main, Mainz, GERMANY.

B-235  Yersinia pestis Type-Three Secretion System-Dependent Inhibition of Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Function.

J. L. Spinner, S. D. Kobayashi;
Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID.

 

129/C. Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Pathogens and Methods

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

C-148  Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests to Determine the Prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis Ocular Infection in Trachoma.

J. Schachter, J. Moncada, T. M. Lietman;
Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA.

C-149  Clinical Evaluation of the BD Viper™ System and the BD ProbeTec™ CTQx Amplified DNA Assay (CTQx) for the Direct Qualitative Screening of Chlamidia trachmonatis (CT) in Female Endocervical, Female Vaginal, and Female Urine Specimens.

W. LeBar1, P. Fine2, D. Fuller3, E. Hook4, L. Mena5,6, B. VanDerPol7, S. Willis8, S. Taylor9;
1HCL-Providence Hosp., Southfield, MI, 2Planned Parenthood of Houston and Southeast Texas, Houston, TX, 3Wishard Hlth. Services, Indianapolis, IN, 4Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, 5Mississippi State Dept. of Hlth., Jackson, MS, 6Univ. of Mississippi Med. Ctr., Jackson, MS, 7Indiana Univ., Indianapolis, IN, 8San Joaquin Pub. Hlth., Stockton, CA, 9Louisiana State Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr., New Orleans, LA.

C-150  Intra and Inter Laboratory Comparison of the Becton Dickinson ProbeTec and VIPER™ Systems for the Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

R. L. Sautter1, D. A. Bankert2, R. L. Drechsel1, B. Goad1, A. E. Crist, Jr2;
1Carolinas Lab. Network, Mecklenburg County Hlth. Dept., Charlotte, NC, 2York Hosp., York, PA.

C-151  COBAS TaqMan CT Test 2.0: Detection of the Swedish Variant by NAAT.

M. M. Krevolin, S-D. Lu, D. Kawa, R. Apple, J. Pane, N. Lee-Lundy;
Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, CA.

C-152  Comparison of Chlamydia Growth in Three Different Strains of Female Tissue Culture Cells.

T. Komoda1, A. Fuji1, H. Bannai1, H. Akita2, S. Iwata3, Y. Sato4, K. Sunakawa5;
1Kyorin Univ., Tokyo, JAPAN, 2St.-Marianna Univ. Sch. of Med., Yokohama City Seibu Hosp., Kanagawa, JAPAN, 3Natl. Tokyo Med. Ctr., Tokyo, JAPAN, 4Ota Fuji Heavy Industry Hosp., Gunma, JAPAN, 5Kitasato Inst. for Life Sci., Kitasato Univ., Tokyo, JAPAN.

C-153  Evaluation of Gen-Probe Combo 2 Performed on Tigris DTS System for Detecting Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

J. Aslanzadeh, J. Miller, Y. Baldonada, P. Hamilton, I. Ratkiewicz;
Hartford Hosp., Hartford, CT.

C-154  Confirming Positive GEN-PROBER APTIMAR TIGRISR DTSR COMBOR Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis Results: APTIMA CT and APTIMA GC Single Analyte Assays vs. Repeat testing on COMBO 2.

M. T. Katanik, M. Sikorski, K. Marigney, S. Schindler, C. Starkey, G. S. Hall;
Cleveland Clin., Cleveland, OH.

C-155  Automated Multiplex Assay System for Simultaneous Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC).

Q. Meng1, D. Monga1, C. Wong1, N. Zhang1, T. Kolachina1, Z. Li1, H. Li1, J. Johnson1, D. V. Ferrero2, D. Sherman1;
1Siemens HealthCare Diagnostics, Inc., Berkeley, CA, 2Univ. of the Pacific, Stockton, CA.

C-156  Workflow and Productivity Efficiencies with the BDTM Viper Sytem and the BDTM ProbeTec.

J. A. MacAfee, M. Guajardo;
Planned Parenthood Mar Monte, San Jose, CA.

C-157  Diagnosis of C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae and T. vaginalis Infections using Urine and Various Swab-types for Self-Collected Vaginal Samples.

M. A. Chernesky, D. Jang, E. Portillo, M. Smieja, Y. Feng;
St. Joseph's Hlth. Care, Hamilton, ON, CANADA.

C-158  Validation of the Gen-Probe APTIMA® TV ASR for Trichomonas vaginalis Specimens Collected in PreservCyt® Liquid Cytology Media and M4RT Transport Media.

J. Harrison1, M. Garrasi1, W. LeBar1,2, K. Moore2, R. Welch2;
1Hosp. Consolidated Lab., Southfield, MI, 2Providence Hosp., Southfield, MI.

C-159  Performance of Trichomonas vaginalis Molecular Analyte-specific Reagent Testing on Primary Clinical Saline Suspensions.

M. Napierala, J. Basile, T. Block, C. Miller, E. Munson;
Wheaton Franciscan Lab., Wauwatosa, WI.

C-160  Beneficiaries of Trichomonas vaginalis Molecular Analyte-Specific Reagent Testing in a Metropolitan Setting of High Sexually-Transmitted Disease Prevalence.

E. Munson1, M. Napierala1, R. Olson1, T. Endes2, T. Block1;
1Wheaton Franciscan Lab., Wauwatosa, WI, 2Wheaton Franciscan Med. Group, Franklin, WI.

C-161  Carriage of Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Species by Male Sexual Partners.

M. Zozaya-Hinchliffe1, R. Lillis2, M. Ferris1,2, S. Taylor2, D. Martin2;
1Research Inst. for Children, New Orleans, LA, 2Louisiana State Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr., New Orleans, LA.

C-162  The Affirm™ VPIII Test Classifies More Subjects Positive for Gardnerella vaginalis and Fewer Positive for Candida sp. than Culture.

R. N. Amos1, R. C. Parke1, H. D. Engler2, M. B. Nye1, B. A. Body1;
1Lab. Corp. of America, Burlington, NC, 2Lab. Corp. of America, Raritan, NJ.

C-163  Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Urine using the BD ProbeTec™ CTQx and GCQx Amplified DNA Assays on the BD Viper™ System in Extracted Mode.

T. Schlitzer;
Becton Dickerson, Sparks, MD.

C-164  Detection of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae on Endocervical and Vaginal Swabs with the BD ProbeTec™ CTQx and GCQx Amplified DNA Assays on the BD ViperTM System in Extracted Mode.

T. Brink, J. Harris, T. Schlitzer, J. Kendall, C. Welborn, S. Giles, C. Martinaitis;
Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD.

C-165  Extensive Variation and Rapid Shift of the MG192 Sequence in Mycoplasma genitalium Strains from Patients with Chronic Infection.

M. Mancuso1, L. Ma1, J. A. Williams2, B. J. Van Der Pol2, J. D. Fortenberry2, D. H. Martin1;
1Louisiana State Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr., New Orleans, LA, 2Indiana Univ. Sch. of Med., Indianapolis, IN.

C-166  Comparison of Workflow and Analytical Sensitivity with Urine Samples between the BD ProbeTec™ ET System and the BD Viper™ System in Extracted Mode.

J. E. Petrilli, C. D. Welborn, B. G. Towns, J. T. Kendall;
BD, Sparks, MD.

 

130/C. Specimen Collection, Transportation and Processing

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

C-167  Evaluation of Seven Microbiology Swab-Collection Devices Including the Use of a Modified M40-A Protocol for Testing ESwabs.

P. P. Bourbeau, B. L. Swartz;
Geisinger Med. Ctr., Danville, PA.

C-168  Comparison of Physical Performance Characteristics (Absorption/Release) of Wound Bacteriology Swabs Compared to ESwabs Including Implications for Routine Use of ESwabs.

B. L. Swartz, P. Bourbeau;
Geisinger Med. Ctr., Danville, PA.

C-169  An Evaluation of an Automated System for Processing Clinical Swabs.

G. A. Jones, R. B. Matthews;
Plymouth Hosp. NHS Trust, Plymouth, UNITED KINGDOM.

C-170  Performance of the BD ProbeTec™ CTQx and GCQx Amplified DNA Assays with Urine and Vaginal Swabs in the Presence of Potential Interfering Substances.

J. Kendall;
Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD.

C-171  Evaluation of a Novel Swab Transport System for Maintaining Viability of Anaerobes and Impact of Using Different Inoculum Broths.

S. E. Farhat1, G. Lim1, R. Malonzo1, B. Shingala1, A. E. Simor1,2,3;
1Alpha Lab., Inc., Toronto, ON, CANADA, 2Sunnybrook Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Toronto, ON, CANADA, 3Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CANADA.

C-172  Recovery of Haemophilus influenzae (HI) Using the New ESwab™ Transport System.

S. Silbert, A. S. Pereira, L. Paschoal, J. Monteiro, A. C. C. Pignatari;
Federal Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, BRAZIL.

C-173  Evaluation of Copan A2B Transport Swabs for Staphylococcus aureus Semi Quantitation in Nasal Samples.

N. Alvarez, D. Debabov, S. Iovino, B. Belisle, N. Georgopapadakou;
NovaBay Pharmaceuticals, Emeryville, CA.

C-174  Comparison of BACTEC PLUS Blood Culture Media to VersaTREK Blood Culture Media to Detect Bacterial Pathogens in Samples Containing Antibiotics.

H. Carrero, L. Ortega, R. Van Brakle, G. Van Horn, M. Scheckelhoff, A. Ewell;
Walter Reed Army Med. Ctr., Washington, DC.

C-175  IV Catheter-Drawn Blood Cultures: Discarding the Initial Aliquot of Blood Does Not Reduce Contamination Rates.

S. A. Dwivedi, R. Bhalla, D. R. Hoover, M. P. Weinstein;
UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Med. Sch., New Brunswick, NJ.

C-176  Do Blood Cultures from Children Require a Pediatric Formulation?

M. E. Reller1, S. Mirrett2, L. B. Reller2;
1Johns Hopkins Med. Inst., Baltimore, MD, 2Duke Univ. Med. Ctr., Durham, NC.

C-177  Conversion to the VersaTREK® Automated Microbial Detection System from the BACTEC® 9240 System: Retrospective Analysis of Data from Three Hospitals.

V. Whitehead1, K. C. Chapin1, D. A. Napert2, J. M. Miller3;
1Rhode Island Hosp., Providence, RI, 2Miriam Hosp., Providence, RI, 3Centrex Lab., New Hartford, NY.

C-178  Performance Comparison of Low-Volume and High-Volume Blood Culture Systems: A Retrospective Study.

S. A. Wahab, L. L. Hallagan, D. R. Lodge-Rigal;
Bloomington Hosp., Bloomington, IN.

C-179  Comparison of BBL CHROMagar Orientation/TSA II Biplate and Three Plate Media for Urine Cultures.

A. Robinson, M. L. Majors, J. D. Claridge;
Sacred Heart Med. Ctr., Spokane, WA.

C-180  Comparison of CefiximeTellurite Sorbitol MacConkey Agar, Sorbitol MacConkey Agar, and CHROMagar O157 for Isolation of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

J. Fernandez, K. G. Van Horn;
Focus Diagnostics, Inc., Cypress, CA.

C-181  Maintenance of the Viability of Lactobacillus Species Transported in A.C.T. I under Different Temperature Conditions.

P. P. Patel, F. Wegerhoff;
Covance Central Lab Services, Indianapolis, IN.

C-182  Recovery of Anaerobic Organisms and Campylobacter species using the Anoxomat System.

R. C. Parke1, P. J. Fearrington1, M. B. Nye1, H. D. Engler2, B. A. Body1;
1Lab. Corp. of America, Burlington, NC, 2Lab. Corp. of America, Raritan, NJ.

C-183  Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Bacterial Cells in Contaminated Platelet Concentrates Using a Newly Developed Bio-imaging System.

N. Yamaguchi1, Y. Motoyama2, M. Matsumoto2, N. Kagami2, Y. Tani3, M. Satake4, M. Nasu1;
1Osaka Univ., Osaka, JAPAN, 2Asahi Breweries, Tokyo, JAPAN, 3Osaka Red Cross Blood Ctr., Osaka, JAPAN, 4Tokyo Metropolitan Red Cross Blood Ctr., Tokyo, JAPAN.

 

131/C. Unusual Organisms and Case Studies

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

C-184  Man’s Best Friend as the Source of -Lactamase Producing Pasteurella multocida: The Cause of Pneumonia and Bacteremia in a 74-Year-Old Man.

H. Namdari1, K. Jacobs2, K. Pidcock3, D. Kosinski2, J. Sibai2;
1Clin-Micro Immunology Ctr., Scranton, PA, 2Mercy Hosp., Scranton, PA, 3Wilkes Univ., Wilkes Barre, PA.

C-185  Kluyvera Infections in the Pediatric Population: Characteristics of an Emerging Pathogen.

K. N. Mizell, J. A. Laurini, J. E. Carter;
Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL.

C-186  AmpC Type Beta-Lactamase Enterobacter cloacae Causing Neonatal Meningitis.

S. M. Juretschko1,2, T. K. Beavers-May1, H. D. Maples2, S. H. Stovall1,2;
1Arkansas Children's Hosp., Little Rock, AR, 2Univ. of Arkansas for Med. Sci., Little Rock, AR.

C-187  The Site and Clinical Significance of Alloscardovia omnicolens and Bifidobacterium Species Routinely Isolated in the Clinical Lab.

S. D. Mahlen1, J. E. Clarridge, III2;
1Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2VA Med. Ctr., Seattle, WA.

C-188  Extraintestinal Manifestations of Edwardsiella tarda Infection: A 10-year Retrospective Review.

J. J. Nelson, J. E. Carter;
Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL.

C-189  Joint Infection Caused by Salmonella enteritidis, and Identification of Salmonella Using Broad Range PCR and Pyrosequencing Technology.

H. Kobayashi, M. J. Tuohy, G. S. Hall, U. Knothe, M. Oethinger, T. Kawamoto, G. W. Procop, T. W. Bauer;
The Cleveland Clin., Cleveland, OH.

C-190  Characterization of Gilardi Rod Group 1 Like Isolates and Assignment to the Genus Ignatzschineria (formerly Schineria).

K. A. Bernard1, T. Burdz1, M. Yuen2;
1Natl. Microbiology Lab., Winnipeg, MB, CANADA, 2Ctr. for Infectious Diseases, Westmead, NSW, AUSTRALIA.

C-191  Tricuspid Valve and Pacemaker Endocarditis due to Pseudallescheria boydii (Scedosporium apiospermum).

J. A. Laurini, J. E. Carter, A. G. Kahn;
Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL.

C-192  Exserohilum sp. Infections in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients.

S. D. Dallas1, D. G. Rupar2, H. W. Clegg3, R. L. Sautter4;
1Carilion Labs, Charlotte, NC, 2Levine Children's Hosp. at Carolinas Med. Center, Charlotte, NC, 3Levine Children's Hosp., Hemby Children's and Presbyterian Hosp., Charlotte, NC, 4Carolinas Pathology Group, Carolinas Lab. Network, Charlotte, NC.

C-193  An Unusual Case of Endocarditis Caused by Candida tropicalis that Emerged Resistant to Fluconazole during Antimicrobial Therapy.

G. Turner, C. Kelley, M. Suseno, L. J. Kaplan, R. B. Thomson, Jr.;
Evanston Hosp. and Northwestern Univ. Feinberg Sch. of Med., Evanston, IL.

C-194  Primary Renal Zygomycotic Infarction Mimicking Renal Neoplasia in an Immunocompetent Patient.

S. Goel, J. E. Carter, M. Culpepper, A. G. Kahn;
Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL.

C-195  Mycobacterium marinum Skin Infections: A Case Series from a Gulf Coast University Healthcare System and Review of the Literature.

K. C. Whithaus, J. E. Carter;
Univ. of South Alabama, Mobile, AL.

C-196  Lepromatous Hansen's Disease in an Elderly Man from Northwest Louisiana.

R. G. Washburn1,2, J. W. King2,1, G. M. Kent1,2, R. E. Normand1, V. L. Moore1, T. S. Rowland1, S. A. Dauenhauer1,2;
1Shreveport VA Med. Ctr., Shreveport, LA, 2Louisiana State Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Shreveport, LA.

C-197  Extra-Hepatic Hydatid Disease: A Pericardial and Intracranial Cysts Pose a Diagnostic Dilemma!

P. R. Hira1, F. Al-Ali2, N. Khalid2, F. A. Al-Shelahi2, A. A. Abdulla3, A. H. Ali2, S. Al-Eneizi2, S. Hebbar2, D. Al-Refaai2;
1Faculty of Med., Kuwait Univ., Kuwait City, KUWAIT, 2Farwania Hosp., Kuwait City, KUWAIT, 3Ibn Sina Hosp., Kuwait City, KUWAIT.

C-198  Fatal Transfusion-Transmitted Babesia microti.

D. E. Blue1,2, J. Cruz3, A. Limiac2, S. Spinola1, T. E. Davis1, D. Waxman3, L. McCarthy1, D. Smith1,2;
1Indiana Univ. Sch. of Med., Indianapolis, IN, 2Clarian Hlth. Partners (Methodist-IU-Riley Hosp.), Indianapolis, IN, 3Indiana Blood Ctr., Indianapolis, IN.

 

132/D. Biofilm Formation by Bacterial Pathogens

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

D-062  Identification of an Exopolysaccharide Involved in Biofilm Formation of Acinetobacter baumannii 307-0294.

K. A. Brossard, A. A. Campagnari;
State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY.

D-063  The Effect Allicin on Bacterial Biofilm Formation and Quorum Sensing.

C. Toth, D. Downes;
Palm Beach Atlantic Univ., West Palm Beach, FL.

D-064  The Effect of Polysorbate 80 on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its Ability to Form Biofilms.

C. M. Toutain-Kidd, G. A. O'Toole, M. E. Zegans;
Dartmouth Med. Sch., Hanover, NH.

D-065  A Novel Method for the Inhibition of Biofilm-Producing Psuedomonas aeruginosa.

M. Gavini, N. Gavini, L. Pulakat;
Mississippi State Univ., Starkville, MS.

D-066  Disruption of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Biofilms by Utilizing Strategies to Depolymerize F-Actin and DNA.

Q. M. Parks1,2, R. L. Young2, K. C. Malcolm1, K. R. Poch1, M. L. Vasil2, J. A. Nick1,2;
1Natl. Jewish Med. and Res. Ctr., Denver, CO, 2Univ. of Colorado, Denver, CO.

D-067  Contact Lens-Associated Keratitis Involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms In Vivo.

K. P. C. Tam1, J. J. Mun1, I. Alarcon2, D. Kowbel1, D. J. Evans1,3, S. M. J. Fleiszig1,2;
1Sch. of Optometry, Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 2Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 3Coll. of Pharmacy, Touro Univ. California, Vallejo, CA.

D-068  Isolation and Characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae Biofilm Mutants in Vivo.

E. J. Muñoz-Elías1, J. Marcano2, A. Camilli1;
1Howard Hughes Med. Inst. and Tufts Univ., Boston, MA, 2Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, PR.

D-069  Surface-Attached Pneumococcal Communities in the Chinchilla Model for Otitis Media.

K. E. Dew, W. Hong, S. D. Reid, W. E. Swords;
Wake Forest Univ. Hlth. Sci., Winston Salem, NC.

D-070  Identification of Streptococcus sanguinis Genes Required for Biofilm Formation and Examination of their Role in Endocarditis Virulence.

X. Ge, T. Kitten, Z. Chen, S. Lee, C. Munro, P. Xu;
Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA.

D-071  Role of Glucan-Binding Proteins in Biofilm Development by Streptococcus mutans.

B. Olson, J. Banas, D. Drake;
Coll. of Dent., Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.

D-072  Immune Response to Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infections.

R. Prabhakara1, J. G. Leid2, J. W. Costerton3, M. E. Shirtliff1;
1Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, 2Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ, 3Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.

D-073  Protective Vaccine against Chronic Infections Due to Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

R. A. Brady1, G. O'May1, J. G. Leid2, J. Costerton3, M. E. Shirtliff1;
1Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, 2Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ, 3Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.

D-074  Influence of Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin (PIA) on Biofilm Maturation in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

M. E. Olson, S. R. Slater, P. M. Dunman, P. D. Fey;
Univ. of Nebraska Med. Ctr., Omaha, NE.

D-075  Gene Expression in ica (+) Clinical S. epidermidis Strains with Distinct Biofilm Phenotypes.

N. Y. Ng, M. Liu, V. Milisavljevic;
Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA.

D-076  Evaluation of Intravascular Needleless Connector Ability to Mitigate Colonization with S. epidermidis and MRSA.

H. J. Maudlin1, C. R. Estling1, J. M. Tippett2, D. Gervich2, J. T. Gray1;
1Des Moines Univ., Des Moines, IA, 2Mercy Med. Ctr., Des Moines, IA.

 

133/D. Haemophilus and Moraxella

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

D-077  Association of IS1016 with the hia Adhesin Gene and Biotypes V and I in Invasive Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

S. W. Satola, B. A. Napier, M. M. Farley;
Emory Univ. and Atlanta VA Med. Ctr., Atlanta, GA.

D-078  A Subset of Strains of Haemophilus influenzae with the IgA1 Protease B Gene Are Clonally Related.

C. Kirkham1, H. Zhong2, A. J. Lesse1, A. L. Brauer1, R. S. Munson, Jr2, T. F. Murphy1;
1Univ. at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 2The Res. Inst. at Nationwide Children's Hosp., Columbus, OH.

D-079  sPLUNC-1 Is a Sialylated Peptide Secreted Abundantly by Nasopharyngeal Epithelial Cells that Kills Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

G. McGillivary, R. S. Munson, Jr., L. O. Bakaletz;
The Res. Inst. at Nationwide Children's Hosp., Columbus, OH.

D-080  The Role of the Heme-Binding Lipoprotein (HbpA) of Haemophilus influenzae Type b in Heme Utilization and Virulence.

D. J. Morton, P. W. Whitby, T. M. VanWagoner, T. W. Seale, T. L. Stull;
Univ. of Oklahoma Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Oklahoma City, OK.

D-081  Phosphorylcholine Confers a Selective Survival Advantage for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in Vivo.

W. Hong, B. Pang, R. Juneau, G. Foster, W. E. Swords;
Wake Forest Univ. Hlth. Sci., Winston-Salem, NC.

D-082  Modulation of Dendritic Cell Maturation and Function by the OMP P5 Adhesin of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

L. A. Novotny, S. Partida-Sanchez, L. O. Bakaletz;
The Res. Inst. at Nationwide Children's Hosp. and The Ohio State Univ. Coll. of Med., Columbus, OH.

D-083  FNR, an Anaerobically Active Regulator, Confers Nitric Oxide Resistance in Haemophilus Influenzae.

J. C. Harrington, B. J. Akerley;
Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch., Worcester, MA.

D-084  Sub-Lethal Concentrations of Antimicrobial Peptides Alter Biofilm Formation by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

J. A. Jurcisek, K. M. Mason, L. O. Bakaletz;
The Res. Inst. at Nationwide Children's Hosp., Columbus, OH.

D-085  The Sap Transporter Is Critical to Survival Strategies by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi).

K. M. Mason, L. O. Bakaletz;
The Res. Inst. at Nationwide Children's Hosp., Columbus, OH.

D-086  Haemophilus Influenzae as Predator and Prey: Evaluation of a Model to Explain Heme Source Availability to Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae in the Chinchilla Model of Otitis Media.

T. W. Seale, D. J. Morton, W. A. Kaserer, V. Awasthi, P. W. Whitby, T. M. VanWagoner, T. L. Stull;
Univ. Oklahoma Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Oklahoma City, OK.

D-087  Production of Biofilm by Haemophilus influenzae Isolated from Pediatric Intractable Otitis Media.

S. Moriyama, M. Hotomi, D. S. Billal, N. Yamanaka;
Wakayama Med. Univ., Wakayama, JAPAN.

D-088  Porin-Deficient Phenotype of Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP:P2AB.

J. Davie, A. Campagnari;
State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY.

D-089  Identification of htrB Genes in Moraxella catarrhalis Lipooligosaccharide Biosynthesis.

S. Gao1,2, D. Peng1,2, A. Muszynski3, R. W. Carlson3, X-X. Gu1;
1NIH/NIDCD, Rockville, MD, 2Yangzhou Univ., Yangzhou, CHINA, 3Complex Carbohydrate Res. Ctr., Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

D-090  Identification and Characterization of a Glycosyltransferase Gene Essential for the Synthesis of Moraxella catarrhalis Lipooligosaccharides.

J. M. Schwingel1, F. St. Michael2, A. D. Cox2, H. Masoud2, J. C. Richards2, A. A. Campagnari1;
1State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY, 2Natl. Res. Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, CANADA.

 

134/E. Antibodies, B Cells, and Microbial Immunity

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

E-031  B-Cell Activation in Response to the Trypanosoma cruzi Mitogen TcPRAC.

M. A. Bryan, K. A. Norris;
Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

E-032  Probing the Mechanism of a Complement-Independent Bactericidal IgM against Relapsing Fever Borrelia.

T. J. LaRocca, L. I. Katona, D. G. Thanassi, J. L. Benach;
Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY.

E-033  Host Resistance to Cryptococcus neoformans: Exploring the Role of the IgM Memory B-cell Compartment.

K. Subramaniam1, A. Guh2, L. Hanau2, B. Metzger2, L-A. Pirofski1;
1Albert Einstein Coll. of Med., Bronx, NY, 2Montefiore Med. Ctr., Bronx, NY.

E-034  Enhanced Epitope Exposure Explains Beneficial Immunomodulation by Monoclonal Antibodies against Streptococcus mutans P1.

R. A. Robinette, M. W. Oli, W. P. McArthur, L. J. Brady;
Univ. of Florida Coll. of Dent., Gainesville, FL.

E-035  Antibodies against Enterococcal LTA Are Broadly Cross-Reactive and Opsonic to many Gram-Positive Bacteria.

C. Theilacker, F. Hammer, I. Sava, A. Kropec, I. Toma, J. Huebner;
Univ. Freiburg, Freiburg, GERMANY.

E-036  Monoclonal Antibodies to the C. trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein Can Protect Wild Type and SCID Mice against an Intranasal Challenge.

S. Pal, J. Bravo, E. M. Peterson, L. M. de la Maza;
Univ. of California, Irvine, CA.

E-037  Interference of Salmonella Motility and Type-Three Secretion by a Protective Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Monoclonal IgA Antibody.

S. J. Forbes1,2, M. Eschmann1,2, T. Bumpus1, W. A. Samsonoff1, N. J. Mantis1,2;
1Wadsworth Ctr., New York State Dept. of Hlth., Albany, NY, 2Univ. at Albany, Albany, NY.

E-038  Anti-Toxin Serum IgG Antibodies Protect the Intestinal Epithelium of Mice from the Effects of the Shiga-Like Toxin Ricin.

C. R. McGuinness, L. M. Neal, E. A. McCarthy, N. J. Mantis;
Wadsworth Ctr., New York State Dept. of Hlth., Albany, NY.

 

135/E. Dendritic Cells and Immune Responses to Microbes

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

E-039  Effects of Sand Fly Salivary Component Maxadilan on Murine Dendritic Cell Migration In Vitro.

K. E. Pauken, W. Wheat, R. Titus;
Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO.

E-040  Lutzomyia longipalpis Salivary Peptide Maxadilan Alters Murine Dendritic Cell Surface Expression of CD80/86, CCR7 and Cytokine Secretion and Reprograms Dendritic Cell-Mediated Cytokine Production in Cultures Containing Allogenenic CD4+ T Cells.

R. G. Titus, K. Pauken, R. Morris, W. Wheat;
Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO.

E-041  Changing Frequency, Phenotype and Location of Dendritic Cells in Mycobacterium-Induced Granulomas at Different Phases of Infection.

H. A. Vonderheid, P. D. Hulseberg, M. Sandor;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

E-042  Campylobacter jejuni-Induced Activation of Murine Dendritic Cells Involves Cooperative Signaling through MyD88 and TRIF.

V. A. K. Rathinam, D. M. Appledorn, J. D. Olmstead, K. A. Hoag, A. Amalfitano, L. S. Mansfield;
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

E-043  Streptolysin O-Mediated Inhibition of Phagosomal Acidification Reduces Processing of Group A Streptococcus Antigens by Human Dendritic Cells.

G. Cortes-Garcia1,2, M. R. Wessels1,2;
1Children's Hosp., Boston, MA, 2Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA.

E-044  The Role of 1, 25(OH)2 D3 in the Pathogenesis of and Immunity against Chlamydia.

Q. He1,2, M. Thierry-Palmer1, K. Joseph2, F. Eko1, D. Lyn1, G. Ananaba1, C. Black2, J. Igietseme1,2;
1Morehouse Sch. of Med., Atlanta, GA, 2CDC, Atlanta, GA.

 

136/H. Gene Expression I: Responses to the Environment - II

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

H-030  The Construction of Whole-Genome Oligomer Microarray and its Application for Transcriptome Analysis of Sulfur Acclimation in Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

Z. Zhang1, N. D. Pendse1, K. N. Phillips2, A. B. Khodursky1;
1BioTechnology Inst., Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 2Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.

H-031  Structural and Functional Analysis of Vibrio vulnificus Quorum Sensing Regulator, SmcR.

B. Kim1, Y. Park1, M. Kim2, S. Choi1;
1Seoul Natl. Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Systems Microbiology Res. Ctr., KRIBB, Daejeon, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

H-032  Characterization of the Histidine Kinase Partners of Enhancer Binding Proteins Important for Myxococcus xanthus Fruiting Body Development.

Z. Sarwar, A. G. Garza;
Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY.

H-033  Evaluation of a Fluorescence-Based Thermal Shift Assay to Map Ligands with Binding Proteins.

S. E. Giuliani, A. M. Frank, L. J. Field, J. L. Saunders, F. R. Collart;
Argonne Natl. Lab., Argonne, IL.

H-035  Investigating the Role of ndvB in Gene Expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms.

T. W. Beaudoin, T-F. C. Mah;
Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, CANADA.

H-036  Evaluation of the Effects of Quorum-Sensing Signaling Pathways on the Expression of hha and other Regulators of LEE Expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

V. K. Sharma1, S. M. D. Bearson1, B. L. Bearson2;
1USDA/ARS, Natl. Animal Disease Ctr., Ames, IA, 2USDA/ARS, Natl. Soil Tilth Lab., Ames, IA.

H-037  Regulation of the Alkylresorcinol Biosynthetic Gene arsA in Azotobacter vinelandii.

Y. Romero-Ramirez1, D. Segura-Gonzalez1, S. Moreno1, M. Catañeda-Lucio2, G. Espin1;
1Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Morelos, MEXICO, 2Benemerita Univ. Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla, MEXICO.

H-038  Identification of the Novel Fur-Binding Site and Its Role in Gene Expression Controlled by Fur in Vibrio vulnificus Genome.

H-J. Lee, K-H. Lee;
Hankuk Univ. Foreign Studies, Yongin, Kyunggi-Do, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

H-039  Characterization of the Promoter Motif Regulated by PSPTO_1209 a FecI-Like ECF Sigma Factor of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

B. Swingle, D. Schneider;
USDA/ARS, Ithaca, NY.

H-040  Genetic Analysis of the Putative swrA Operon of Bacillus subtilis.

J. E. Patrick, D. B. Kearns;
Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN.

H-041  Mutation of relA Disrupts Quorum Sensing Signal Production and Growth Characteristics in a Sphingomonas sp. Isolated from a Grape Crown Gall Tumor.

H. Gan1, E. Szegedi2, M. Savka1;
1Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY, 2Res. Inst. for Viticulture and Enology, Kecskemet, HUNGARY.

H-042  Application of in vivo Expression Technology as a Means to Identify Plant-Induced Rhizobacterial Genes under Suboptimal Temperature Conditions.

K. A. Ford, C. L. Patten;
Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, CANADA.

H-043  A LysR-type Transcriptional Regulator of Caulobacter crescentus Is Involved in Oxidative Stress Response.

V. S. Braz, J. F. da Silva Neto, V. C. S. Italiani, M. V. Marques;
Univ. of São Paulo, São Paulo, BRAZIL.

H-044  A Pseudomonas aeruginosa oxyR Mutant Requires Catalase (KatB) for Protection against H2O2 in Planktonic Culture While It Requires Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase (AhpCF) in Biofilms.

W. Panmanee, D. J. Hassett;
Univ. of Cincinnati Coll. of Med., Cincinnati, OH.

 

137/H. Gene Expression II: Regulatory Networks

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

H-045  Competence for Genetic Transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae: Termination of Activity of the Alternative Sigma Factor, ComX, Is Independent of Proteolysis and of Expression of Early Genes.

A. Piotrowski, D. A. Morrison;
Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL.

H-046  Characterization of the YgiXY Two-Component Signal Transduction System of the Capnophilic Rumen Bacterium Mannheimia succiniciproducens.

E-G. Lee1, W. Jung1, J. Shin1, D-B. Oh1, H. Kang1, S. Lee2, O. Kwon1;
1Korea Res. Inst. of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Korea Advanced Inst. of Sci. and Technology, Daejeon, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

H-047  Cell-Type-Specific Patterned Transcriptional Expression in Nostoc punctiforme.

J. B. Polin, M. L. Summers;
California State Univ., Northridge, CA.

H-048  Progressively Increasing Sensor Kinase beyond a Threshold Level Triggers Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis.

P. Eswara Moorthy, J. Dinh, M. Bhattacharya, M. Fujita;
Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX.

H-049  Signal Integration in the Galactose Network of Escherichia coli.

S. Semsey1, S. Krishna2, K. Sneppen2, S. Adhya3;
1ELTE, Budapest, HUNGARY, 2CMOL/NBI, Copenhagen, DENMARK, 3NCI, Bethesda, MD.

H-050  Identification of Interactions within the GacA/S Two-Component Regulatory System of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0.

L. Chang, M. L. Workentine, H. Ceri, R. J. Turner;
Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CANADA.

H-051  Serratia marcescens Biofilm Formation and Fimbriae Production Are Regulated by Intracellular Levels of cAMP.

E. J. Kalivoda1, N. A. Stella1, D. M. O'Dee2, G. J. Nau2, R. M. Q. Shanks1,2;
1UPMC Eye Center, Pittsburgh, PA, 2Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Med., Pittsburgh, PA.

H-052  Identification of a Novel Gene Z0021 Involved in Flagella-Mediated Motility in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

U. Silphaduang1, B. K. Coombes2, A. M. Kropinski3, M. Mascarenhas3, M. A. Karmali3;
1Univ. of Guelph, Guelph, ON, CANADA, 2McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON, CANADA, 3Lab. for Foodborne Zoonoses, Pub. Hlth. Agency of Canada, Guelph, ON, CANADA.

H-053  Characterization of Fur in Nitrosomonas europaea.

N. Vajrala, X. Wei, L. A. Sayavedra-Soto, D. J. Arp;
Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR.

H-054  Nutrient Availability Regulates Swarmer Cell Differentiation in Caulobacter crescentus.

J. C. England1, B. S. Perchuk2, M. T. Laub2, J. W. Gober1;
1Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA, 2Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

H-055  Identification of the Core Components Required for sG Activation during Bacillus subtilis Sporulation.

A. H. Camp, R. Losick;
Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA.

H-056  A New Player in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Circuitry.

R. L. Baldini1, A. P. B. Nascimento1, V. Dekimpe2, E. Déziel2, L. G. Rahme3;
1Univ. de São Paulo, São Paulo, BRAZIL, 2INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Laval, QC, CANADA, 3Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA.

H-057  PGA Accumulation and Biofilm Formation in Escherichia coli: Modulation by c-di-GMP.

C. C. Goller1, A. Pannuri1, T. Romeo1, Y. Itoh2, K. Suzuki3;
1Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA, 2Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo, JAPAN, 3Niigata Univ., Niigata, JAPAN.

H-058  The Role of a LysR-Family Regulator in the Formation of Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilms.

C. N. McQueary, L. A. Actis;
Miami Univ., Oxford, OH.

H-059  Building Biological Memory by Coherent Linkage of Distinct Positive Feedback Loops.

D-E. Chang, A. Reifler, S. Leung, D. B. Forger, A. J. Ninfa;
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

H-060  Structural Conservation of the Lrp Regulon.

P. Srivastava1, B. M. Vaz2, A. B. Khodursky1;
1Univ. of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN, 2Hamline Univ., Saint Paul, MN.

H-061  Identification and Characterization of Target Developmental Genes for the Nla6 and Nla28 Enhancer Binding Proteins.

K. M. Giglio1, N. B. Caberoy2, K. Murphy3, G. Suen1, R. Welch1, A. Garza1;
1Syracuse Univ., Syraucse, NY, 2Univ. of Miami, Miami, FL, 3Waldorf Coll., Forrest City, IA.

H-062  Regulation of Vibrio cholerae Biofilm by NspS and MbaA.

J. P. Zayner, E. Karatan;
Appalachian State Univ., Boone, NC.

H-063  Identification of Ligand Specificity Determinants in AgrC, the S. aureus Quorum Sensing Receptor.

E. Geisinger1, E. A. George2, T. W. Muir2, R. P. Novick1;
1New York Univ. Sch. of Med., New York, NY, 2Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY.

H-064  Characterization of Two Novel Small RNAs of Pseudomonas syringae DC3000.

M. J. Filiatrault, P. A. Bronstein, P. Stodghill, N. Hause, D. J. Schneider, S. Cartinhour;
USDA/ARS, Ithaca, NY.

H-065  LapD is a Cyclic di-GMP Binding Protein Required for Localization and Stability of the LapA Adhesin in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

P. D. Newell, G. A. O'Toole, Jr;
Dartmouth Med. Sch., Hanover, NH.

H-066  High Throughput Mapping of Caulobacter crescentus Protein Interactions Using Tandem Affinity Purification.

P. Hu1, J. Zhu1, G. L. Andersen1, L. Shapiro2, H. H. McAdams2, T. Earnest1;
1Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA, 2Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA.

H-067  Determination of the Global Regulatory Role of CsrA in Escherichia coli.

A. N. Edwards1, J. W. Mercante1, P. Babitzke2, T. Romeo1;
1Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA, 2Pennsylvania State Univ., College Park, PA.

H-068  The Escherichia coli sRNAs CsrB and CsrC Are Strongly Induced during Growth in Nutrient Poor Medium.

K. Jonas1,2, O. Melefors1,2;
1Karolinska Inst., Stockholm, SWEDEN, 2Swedish Inst. for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, SWEDEN.

 

138/I. Microbial Metabolism and Products

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

I-016 Utilizing the Mevalonate Pathway for Retinal Production in Escherichia coli.

S. Dobreniecki, J. R. Anthony;
Univ. of the Sci. in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA.

I-017 Analyses of the Bifid Shunt and Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bifidobacterium spp. Using 13C-Labeled Substrates and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

T. R. Whitehead1, A. Adeuya2, N. P. J. Price2;
1USDA/ARS/NCAUR/FBT, Peoria, IL, 2USDA/ARS/NCAUR/BBC, Peoria, IL.

I-018 Regulatory Role of Ornithine Cyclodeaminase in Ornithine Production Depending on Proline Concentration in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

S. Lee, J. Min;
Chonbuk Natl. Univ., Jeonju, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

I-019 Oxalate-Consuming Activities of Probiotic Microorganisms.

A. E. C. Baluka, S. L. Daniel;
Eastern Illinois Univ., Charleston, IL.

I-020 Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the Phe224 Residue at the Substrate Binding Sites of Naphthalene Dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain NCIB 9816-4.

J. Seo1, Y. Noh1, Y. Chong2, Y. Lim2, J. Han3, S-I. Kang1, H-G. Hur1;
1Gwangju Inst. of Sci. and Technology, Gwangju, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Konkuk Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 3Chung-Ang Univ., Anseong, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

I-021 Effect of Citrate on Oligosaccharide Synthesis in Engineered Agrobacterium sp.

A. M. Ruffing, Z. Mao, R. R. Chen;
Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA.

I-022 Production of Hexanol and Hexanoic Acid by the Acetogen Clostridium carboxidivorans Strain P7T.

J. Saxena, R. S. Tanner;
Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK.

I-023 Influence of Carbon Source on Biosurfactant Production by Rhodococcus sp.

A. Holguin-Salas, M. L. Ballinas-Casarrubias, J. V. Torres-Muñoz, R. Márquez-Meléndez, G. V. Nevárez-Moorillón;
Univ. Autonoma de Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chih., MEXICO.

I-024 Phylogenetic Conservation of Insulin Function.

B. J. Plotkin1, L. Phouikham1, J. M. Green1, R. Relwani1, M. I. Konaklieva2;
1Midwestern Univ., Downers Grove, IL, 2American Univ., Washington, DC.

I-025 A Novel Perchlorate-Reducing Alpha Proteobacteria Capable of Mesophilic Anaerobic Iron Oxidation.

J. C. Thrash1, L. A. Achenbach2, J. D. Coates1;
1Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 2Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL.

I-026 Metabolism of Thiosulfate for Photolithoautotrophic Growth and Nitrogen Fixation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

J. J. Huang, E. K. Heiniger, C. Nguyen, C. S. Harwood;
Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA.

I-027 Aminoguanidine Downregulates Expression of Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase in Bacillus subtilis.

E. R. Treece, T. D. Kim;
Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY.

I-028 Characterization of a Carotenogenic Gene Cluster from a Marine Bacterium.

J. A. Maresca, J. C. Braff, E. F. Delong;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

I-029 Production of Hydrogen from Glucose or Raw Sewage by Novel Isolates of Anaerobaculum.

M. W. Maune, R. S. Tanner;
Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK.

I-030 Determination of the Emulsification Index in Biosurfactant Producing Soil Bacteria Isolated from Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soil.

M. C. Portillo-Ruiz, S. Viramontes-Ramos, O. Gónzalez-Rangel, M. L. Ballinas-Casarrubias, B. E. Rivera-Chavira, G. V. Nevárez-Moorillón;
Univ. Autonoma de Chihuahua, Chihuahua, MEXICO.

I-031 Discovery and Utilization of the Acinetobacter venetianus Polyelectrolyte (APE) Polysaccharide.

M. P. Mercaldi, B. Panilaitis, D. L. Kaplan;
Tufts Univ., Medford, MA.

I-032 Isolation of Phenol, Monochlorophenol and 4-Chlorobiphenyl-Degrading Bacteria Using Colony PCR Method.

L. Jin1, K. Kim2, J. Lim1, D-s. An1, S-T. Lee1;
1Korea Advanced Inst. of Sci. and Technology, Daejeon, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Korea Res. Inst. of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

I-033 Production of Omega-3 Fatty Acids by Shewanella baltica sp.

M. Amiri-Jami1,2, N. Batra1, M. W. Griffiths1,2;
1Univ. of Guelph, Guelph, ON, CANADA, 2Canadian Res. Inst. for Food Safety, Guelph, ON, CANADA.

I-034 Going Wireless? Additional Phenotypes of a Pilin-Deficient Mutant Weaken the Genetic Evidence for the Role of Microbial Nanowires in Extracellular Electron Transfer.

M. Izallalen, R. H. Glaven, T. Mester, K. P. Nevin, A. E. Franks, D. R. Lovley;
Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

 

139/K. Metabolism and Enzymology - I

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

K-041  Characterization of Two ATP Phosphoribosyltransferase Isoenzymes of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

M. A. Aklujkar, D. R. Lovley;
Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

K-042  Evidence for Two Pathways for Isoleucine Biosynthesis in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

M. V. Coppi1, C. Risso1, S. J. VanDien2, A. Orloff1, P. C. Moe1, D. R. Lovley1;
1Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 2Genomatica Inc., San Diego, CA.

K-043  Specificity of Redox Enzyme Maturation Protein Binding to RR-Containing Peptides of Tat-Dependent Proteins.

C. S. Chan, L. Chang, R. J. Turner;
Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CANADA.

K-044  Change of 2-Oxoglutarate Pool Is a Rapid Response of Escherichia coli to External Nitrogen Availability.

D. Yan1,2, P. Lenz3, T. Hwa2;
1Indiana Univ. Sch. of Med., Indianapolis, IN, 2Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA, 3Univ. of Marburg, Marburg, GERMANY.

K-045  Thermodynamic Electron Equivalent Models of Geobacter Species.

B. Sayyar1, K. Nevin2, D. Lovley2, R. Mahadevan1;
1Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CANADA, 2Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

K-046  Key Components of Central Metabolism Contribute to Pyocyanin Reduction Activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

A. Price-Whelan1, J. Huang2, D. K. Newman1;
1Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

K-047  Genetic Identification of the Bacteriohopanepolyol C-2 Methyltransferase in Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1.

P. V. Welander1, A. L. Sessions2, D. K. Newman1;
1Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

K-048  Phenazine Production Influences Biofilm Initiation and Development in Pseudomonas Aeruginosa PA14.

I. Ramos-Solis, L. Dietrich, D. Newman;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

K-049  Purification and Characterization of Folate Salvage Enzyme p-Aminobenzoyl-glutamate Lyase from Escherichia coli.

J. M. Green, L. Pitstick, E. L. Carter;
Midwestern Univ., Downers Grove, IL.

K-050  Physical and Kinetic Evidence for Direct Reduced Flavin Transfer in the Alkanesulfonate Monooxygenase System.

K. Abdurachim1, H. R. Ellis2;
1Yale Univ., New Haven, CT, 2Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL.

K-051  To Denitrify or not to Denitrify? That’s the Question for Gram-Positive Bacteria.

P. De Vos, I. Verbaendert, K. Heylen;
Ghent Univ., Gent, BELGIUM.

K-052  Model-Based Analysis of Proton Production and Consumption during Growth of Geobacter Species and Escherichia coli.

K. Srinivasan1, M. Izallalen2, D. R. Lovley2, R. Mahadevan1;
1Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CANADA, 2Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

K-053  Selenium Availability Influences the Antimicrobial Action of Stannous Salts against Treponema denticola.

S. Jackson-Rosario, R. Tarrien, C. Korsvik, W. T. Self;
Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL.

K-054  Metabolic Pathways in the Pleomorphic Metal-Reducing Organism Desulfovibrio africanus Strain PCS.

R. Chakraborty1, Y. Tang1, F. Pingitore1, J. D. Keasling1,2, T. C. Hazen1;
1Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA, 2Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA.

K-055  Increased Expression of Hemoprotein BchZ of Chlorophyllide a Reductase upon Semi-aerobiosis Results in the Enhancement of Bacteriochlorophyll Synthesis of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

E-J. Kim, H. J. Rhee, J. K. Lee;
Sogang Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

K-056  Inhibition of Chlorophyll Synthase of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 by Bacteriochlorophyllide a.

M-K. Lee, J. K. Lee;
Sogang Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

K-057  A Genome Based Metabolic Model for the Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

S. Gonyea1, A. J. Reese1, S. Fong2;
1Cedar Crest Coll., Allentown, PA, 2Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA.

K-058  Validation of Physiological Properties of Shewanella spp. Based on Phylogenetics and Genomics.

Y. Wang1, J. Kan1, T. V. Karpinets2, A. Obraztsova1, K. Nealson1;
1Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2Univ. of Tennessee, Oak Ridge, TN.

K-059  Identification of Amino Acid Synthesis Pathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris by Isotopic Labeling, Metabolite Analysis, and Genome Sequence Analysis.

M. N. Price1,2, Y. J. Tang1,2, P. I. Benke1,2, E. E. Baidoo1,2, S. R. Chhabra1,2, S. M. Stolyar3,2, O-Y. Fok1,2, S. Myers1,2, P. S. Dehal1, A. Mukhopadhyay1,2, G. M. Zane4,2, J. D. Wall4,2, J. D. Keasling1,2,5, A. P. Arkin1,2,5;
1Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA, 2Virtual Inst. for Microbial Stress and Survival, Berkeley, CA, 3Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA, 4Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 5Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA.

K-060  Isolation of Novel (+)-Catechin Degrading Bacterium, Burkholderia sp. KTC-1, from Tropical Peat and Detection of Taxifolin as Intermediate of (+)-Catechin Metabolism.

Y. Otsuka1, M. Matsuda2, M. Nakamura1, S. Jin3, J. Wasaki3, J. Watanabe3, T. Watanabe2, M. Osaki2;
1Forestry and Forest Products Res. Inst., Tsukuba, JAPAN, 2Graduate Sch. of Agriculture, Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo, JAPAN, 3Creative Res. Inst., Sapporo, JAPAN.

K-061  Validation of Missing Gene Functions in the Rhamnose Metabolic Pathway of Bacillus, Streptomyces, and Salmonella.

K. M. Stanton, A. A. Best;
Hope Coll., Holland, MI.

 

140/K. Metabolism and Enzymology - II

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

K-062  The Recombinant Expression of a Soluble Oxidoreductase from Carboxydothermus ferrireducens.

R. U. Onyenwoke;
Kenyon Coll., Gambier, OH.

K-063  Alternansucrase-Derived Prebiotic Oligosaccharides Enhance Enzyme Activity in Bifidobacterium.

S. M. Holt1, J. M. Teresi2, G. L. Cote2;
1Western Illinois Univ., Macomb, IL, 2USDA, Peoria, IL.

K-064  The Structure of a DsbA-Substrate Complex: Implications for Substrate Recognition by Oxidoreductases.

J. J. Paxman1, N. A. Borg1, J. Horne1, J. Rossjohn1, P. Thompson1, S. Piek2, C. M. Kahler2, H. Sakellaris2, M. J. Scanlon1;
1Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC, AUSTRALIA, 2Univ. of Western Australia, Perth, WA, AUSTRALIA.

K-065  b-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III (FabH) of Listeria monocytogenes Has Increased Preference for the Precursor of Anteiso Fatty Acids over Iso Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Precursors at Low Temperature.

A. K. Singh1, Y. M. Zhang2, K. Zhu2, C. Gatto1, R. K. Jayaswal1, C. O. Rock2, B. J. Wilkinson1;
1Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL, 2St Jude Children's Research Hosp., Memphis, TN.

K-066  Isolation and Characterization of Telephthalate and Isophthalate Utilizing Bacteria from Compost.

Y. Kishi, H. Takeda, K. Ohgi;
Hoshi Univ., Tokyo, JAPAN.

K-067  Characterization of Fibrinolytic Enzyme, "Fibzyme" Excreted by Bacillus subtilis MK-15.

K. H. Oh1, B. U. Lee2, Y. S. Cho1, B. H. Sohn1;
1Soonchunhyang Univ., Asan, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Kosin Univ., Busan, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

K-068  The PduX Enzyme of Salmonella enterica Is a Threonine Kinase Used for Coenzyme B12 Synthesis.

C. Fan, T. A. Bobik;
Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA.

K-069  Role of Maltogenic Amylase and Pullulanase in the Metabolism of Maltodextrin and Glycogen in Bacillus subtilis 168.

J-W. Kim1, C-H. Cha1, J-T. Park2, J-H. Shim2, W. Boos3, K-H. Park2;
1Univ. of Incheon, Incheon, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Seoul Natl. Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 3Univ. of Konstanz, Konstanz, GERMANY.

K-070  Killing Effect of 3-Methyleneoxindol (MOI) and Glutathionyl Methyleneoxindol (GS-MOI) on Trypanosoma brucei YTAT1.1 Procyclic Forms in Vitro.

P. E. Mancini, P. Garcia da Silva;
Bridgewater State Coll., Bridgewater, MA.

K-071  Two-Photon Imaging of Redox-Active Phenazine “Antibiotics” in vivo and in Biofilms.

Y. Wang, D. S. Tzeranis, I. Ramos-Solis, P. T. C. So, D. K. Newman;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

K-072  Proline Catabolism in Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

C. E. Deutch;
Arizona State Univ., Phoenix, AZ.

K-073  An Iron-Containing Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Thermococcus Strain ES1: Heterologous Expression in Escherichia coli and Molecular Characterization of the Recombinant Enzyme.

X. Ying1, A. M. Grunden2, L. Nie1, M. W. W. Adams3, K. Ma1;
1Univ. of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, CANADA, 2North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC, 3Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

K-074  The Physiological Role of the Cytoplasmic Hydrogenases in D. vulgaris Hildenborough.

S. Stolyar1, N. Pinel1, C. B. Walker1, J. Wall2, D. A. Stahl1;
1Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO.

K-075  Azoreductase Activity of Skin Bacteria.

R. L. Stingley, H. Chen, C. Cerniglia;
Natl. Ctr. for Toxicological Res., Jefferson, AR.

K-076  Isolation and Biochemical Characterization of Carboxysomes from the Chemolithoautotrophs Thiomonas intermedia and Thiomicrospira crunogena.

B. B. Menon1, Z. Dou1, J. M. Shively2, S. Heinhorst1, G. C. Cannon1;
1Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, 2Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC.

K-077  Studies of Carboxysomes Assembly in vitro and in vivo.

Z. Dou1, S. Heinhorst1, J. M. Shively1,2, G. C. Cannon1;
1Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, 2Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC.

K-078  Expression of Functional hydA from Anerobic Enterobacter cloacae into Aerobic Azotobacter vinelandii.

L. Pulakat, N. Gavini;
Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS.

K-079  2-Phosphonomethylmalate Synthase Is a Novel Driving Reaction for C-P Bond Formation in the Biosynthesis of the Antimalarial Compound FR900098.

B. M. Griffin, W. W. Metcalf;
Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL.

K-080  Metabolic Dynamics and Heterogeneity in Shewanella oneidensis Biofilms.

T. K. Teal1, I. Ramos2, B. J. Wold1, D. K. Newman2;
1California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 2Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

K-081  Different Recruitment of the TolB Translocation Portal by the Natively Disordered Domain of Colicins.

Y. Zhang, M. Vankemmelbeke, C. Li, M. Paoli, C. N. Penfold, R. James;
Univ. of Nottingham, Nottingham, UNITED KINGDOM.

 

141/N. Marine Microbiology - II

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

N-121  Prokaryotic Diversity in an Oxygen Minimum Zone off the Coast of Oregon.

A. D. Bertagnolli, A. H. Treush, O. U. Mason, U. Stingl, K. Vergin, F. T. Chan, S. J. Giovannoni;
Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR.

N-122  Characterization of Novel Marine Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Resistant to RDX and Other Explosives.

R. Chakraborty1, N. Ramos-Hernandez2, E. X. Perez2, Y. Katsuura1, A. Massol-Deya2, T. C. Hazen1;
1Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA, 2Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR.

N-123  Identification of a Novel Phosphonate Utilization Pathway in Marine Microorganisms by Functional Metagenomic Analysis.

A. Martinez, E. F. DeLong;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

N-124  Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Cariaco Basin Bacterial Communities in Relation to Biogeochemical Gradients.

M. Rodriguez-Mora1, A. Chistoserdov1, X. N. Li2, M. I. Scranton2, G. T. Taylor2, X. Lin3;
1Univ. of Louisiana, Lafayette, LA, 2Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY, 3Stroud Water Res. Ctr,, Avondale, PA.

N-125  Community Composition of Picoeukaryotes in Open Ocean and Coastal Waters.

M. L. Cuvelier1, E. Demir2, B. J. Binder3, A. Z. Worden2;
1Univ. of Miami - RSMAS, Miami, FL, 2Monterey Bay Aquarium Res. Inst., Moss Landing, CA, 3Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

N-126  Natural Diversity and Experimental Evolution of Environmental Stress Tolerance in Marine Bacteria.

A. C. Materna1, S. A. Clarke1, C. Cruz1, X. Gao1, E. J. Alm1,2,3;
1Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2The Virtual Inst. of Microbial Stress and Survival, Berkeley, CA, 3The Broad Inst. of MIT and Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA.

N-127  Environmental Persistence of the Elkhorn Coral Pathogen PDL-100 (Serratia marcescens).

E. E. Looney, E. K. Lipp;
Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

N-128  Microbial Succession on Native Rock and Artificial Surfaces in the Marine Environment.

A. Patel, J. Steele, J. Fuhrman;
Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.

 

142/N. Extreme Environments - I

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

N-129  Comparison of Survival of Spacecraft-Associated Bacteria and Endospores within Two Different Mars Simulation Chambers.

M. T. La Duc1, S. Osman1, Z. Peeters2, P. Ehrenfreund2, A. Schuerger3, R. Mancinelli4, K. Venkateswaran1;
1Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 2Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Astrobiology Lab., Leiden, NETHERLANDS, 3Univ. of Florida, Kennedy Space Center, FL, 4Carl Sagan Ctr., SETI Inst., Mountain View, CA.

N-130  Molecular Microbial Burden and Community Analyses of Phoenix Spacecraft Assembly.

S. Osman, S. Ghosh, P. Vaishampayan, K. Venkateswaran;
NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA.

N-131  Susceptibility of Extreme Halophiles to Mercury using Resazurin Reduction Kinetics.

S. R. Slight, A. R. Harker, D. P. Breakwell;
Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT.

N-132  Microbial Diversity of Volcanic Hot Springs of the Lesser Antilles, St. Lucia, W.I.

L. M. Stout1, R. E. Blake1, J. P. Greenwood2, A. M. Martini3, E. Rose1;
1Yale Univ., New Haven, CT, 2Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT, 3Amherst Coll., Amherst, MA.

N-133  Impacts of Water Stress on Carbon Monoxide-Oxidation in Recent Volcanic Deposits.

C. F. Weber, G. M. King;
Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA.

N-134  Phosphate and Phosphonate Use by Microorganisms Isolated from Hypersaline Environments of the Great Salt Lake, Utah.

M. D. Zwolinski, C. S. Sessions, J. L. Scadden, C. J. Oberg;
Weber State Univ., Ogden, UT.

N-135  Microbially Mediated Cave Formation: The Potential for Alkali-Speleogenesis in Roraima Sur Cave, Venezuela.

M. Broering1, E. Banks1, J. Giarrizzo2, P. Suarez2, K. Venkateswaran3, H. A. Barton1;
1Northern Kentucky Univ., Highland Heights, KY, 2Univ. Simon Bolivar, Caracas, VENEZUELA, 3Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA.

N-136  Survival of Methanogens Following Desiccation at Mars Surface Pressure for 60 Days.

T. Kral, T. Altheide;
Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR.

N-137  Characterization of Microbial Communities in Biofilms Associated with Rock Varnish from Panamint Valley, CA.

E. M. Eggleston1, W. D. Leavitt2, J. M. Tor1;
1Hampshire Coll., Amherst, MA, 2Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA.

N-138  Microbial Succession along a Glacial Foreland Chronological Sequence in the High Arctic, Spitsbergen, Norway.

U. Schütte1, Z. Abdo1, S. Bent2, C. Williams1, M. Schneider1, B. Solheim3, L. Forney1;
1Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID, 2Yale Univ., New Haven, CT, 3Univ. of Tromsø, Tromsø, NORWAY.

N-139  Developing a Kinetic Model for Bacterial Oxidation of Iron in the Presence of Ferric Iron, Zinc and Nickel.

P. Nurmi1, B. Özkaya1, A. H. Kaksonen1, J. A. Puhakka1, O. H. Tuovinen1,2;
1Tampere Univ. of Technology, Tampere, FINLAND, 2Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH.

N-140  Isolation and Characterization of Chitin-Utilizing Halophiles from the Great Salt Lake, UT.

C. J. Oberg, K. M. Bowcutt, B. Burton, D. R. Cox, M. D. Zwolinski;
Weber State Univ., Ogden, UT.

N-141  Arsenic Oxidizing Chemoautotrophic Microorganisms from Geothermal Water and Sediments.

E. García-Domínguez1, M. Bruno1, D. Nordstrom2, L. Young1;
1Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ, 2U.S. Geological Survey, Boulder, CO.

N-142  Cultivation-Based and Microscopic Characterization of Ancient Algal Mats from the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

D. E. Antibus1, L. G. Leff1, J. L. Baeseman2, B. L. Hall3, C. Blackwood1;
1Kent State Univ., Kent, OH, 2ARCUS, Fairbanks, AK, 3Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME.

N-143  Bacterial Growth at Concentrations of Magnesium Sulfate Found in Martian Soils.

J. D. Crisler, T. M. Newville, M. A. Schneegurt;
Wichita State Univ., Wichita, KS.

N-144  Examining Microbial Community Profiles from Natural Acid Rock Drainage at Peekaboo Gulch Colorado.

S. DiFurio1, S. M. Pfiffner1, J. Kuntzman1, C. Webster2, J. Tapp2, A. Buchan3;
1Univ. of Tennessee, Ctr. for Environmental Microbiology, Knoxville, TN, 2Univ. of Tulsa, Ctr. for Applied Biogeosciences, Tulsa, OK, 3Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN.

N-145  Assessing Power Production and Microbial Ecology of Environmental Marine Microbial Fuel Cells.

H. K. White1, C. E. Reimers2, M. Nielsen2, S. Sharma1, P. R. Girguis1;
1Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA, 2Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR.

N-146  Microbial Communities of a Low Order, Acid Mine Impacted Stream.

S. Ghosh, M. Moitra, D. Antibus, C. Woolverton, L. Leff;
Kent State Univ., Kent, OH.

N-147  Diversity and Biogeography of Korarchaeota in Hot Springs.

R. L. Miller-Coleman1, K. C. Costa1, E. L. Shock2, B. P. Hedlund1;
1Sch. of Life Sciences, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, 2Sch. of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ.

N-148  Identifying Novel Thermophilic Bacteria from Soils Overlying the Centralia, Pennsylvania Coal Mine Fire.

T. C. Tobin-Janzen, A. Alkhateeb, K. Brown, A. Thompson, C. P. Janzen;
Susquehanna Univ., Selinsgrove, PA.

N-149  DNA Repair Potential of the Halomonas spp. from the Great Salt Plain.

D. G. Rudrappa, R. V. Miller;
Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK.

N-150  Using 454 Tag Sequencing to Determine the Diversity and Distribution of Subseafloor Indicator Organisms at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Seamounts of the Pacific Ocean.

J. A. Huber1, D. A. Butterfield2, P. R. Neal1, S. M. Huse1, D. B. Mark Welch1, H. G. Morrison1, M. L. Sogin1;
1Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA, 2Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA.

N-151  Metabolic Diversity and Dynamics of the Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Communities Revealed by Combined Molecular Approaches.

F. Wang1, J. Meng1, H. Zhou2, X. Peng2, Y. Deng3, Z. He3, J. Zhou3, X. Xiao1;
1Third Inst. of Oceanography, Xiamnen, CHINA, 2Guanzhou Geochemistry Inst., China Academy of Sci., Guangzhou, CHINA, 3Univ. of Okalahoma, Norman, OK.

N-152  Microbial Communities of Deep Groundwater Ecosystem after an Extensive Uranium Leaching in the Strá pod Ralskem Site - Czech Republic.

V. Libova1, O. Korotkevych1, A. Benakova1, J. Charvat2, P. Franta3, P. Rossi4, M. V. Brennerova1;
1Inst. Microbiol., Prague, CZECH REPUBLIC, 2DIAMO, Strá pod Ralskem, CZECH REPUBLIC, 3Nuclear Res. Inst., e, CZECH REPUBLIC, 4EPFL – LBE, Lausanne, SWITZERLAND.

N-153  Microbial Phospholipid Fatty Acid (PLFA) Profiles of Core Samples from Two Geochemically Distinct Thermal Pools in Kamchatka, Far East Russia.

E. A. Burgess1, J. M. Unrine1,2, J. Wiegel3, G. L. Mills1;
1Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC, 2Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 3Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

N-154  Microbial Community Composition and Diversity in Unusual, Ophiolite-Hosted Alkaline Waters.

S. J. Green1,2,3, D. F. Blake2, J. G. Blank1;
1SETI Inst., Mountain View, CA, 2NASA-Ames Res. Ctr., Moffett Field, CA, 3Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL.

N-155  Characterization of Halophilic and Halotolerant Bacteria from Mineral Springs in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky.

D. S. Treves, C. Shively, A. Tate, L. Burke;
Indiana Univ. Southeast, New Albany, IN.

N-156  Novel Ultramicrobacterial Isolates from a Deep Greenland Ice Core Represent a Proposed New Species, Chryseobacterium greenlandensis sp. nov.

J. Loveland-Curtze, V. I. Miteva, J. E. Brenchley;
Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA.

N-157  Effects of Salinity and Temperature on Microbial Growth in Filtered Don Juan Pond Water-Antarctica.

A. Chan, B. Lanoil, S. Han;
Univ. of California, Riverside, CA.

N-158  A Novel Species of Haloanerobium Identified from a Haloalkaline Lake Has the Potential to Contribute to Biodiesel Production.

M. B. Begeman1, M. R. Mormile2, H. C. Pinkart3, J. D. Wall1, D. A. Elias1;
1Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 2Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO, 3Central Washington Univ., Ellensburg, WA.

 

143/N. Molecular Microbial Ecology - Communities - II

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

N-159  Crenarchaeal Prevalence in the Elfin Forest at El Yunque Rain Forest in Puerto Rico.

I. Santiago-Rivera, C. E. Bonilla-Rivera, J. R. Perez-Jimenez;
Univ. del Turabo, Gurabo, PR.

N-160  Microbial Communities as Sensitive Indicators of Ecosystem Health and Processes in Bauxite Soils of Jamaica.

D. E. Lewis, A. Chauhan, H. N. Williams;
Florida A&M Univ., Tallahassee, FL.

N-161  Microbial Communities at the Metal Contaminated Lake Sediment.

S. Kang1, H. L. Gough2, J. Van Nostrand1,3, Z. He1,3, L. Wu1,3, D. A. Stahl2,3, T. C. Hazen4,3, J. Zhou1,3;
1Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 2Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA, 3Virtual Inst. for Microbial Stress and Survial, Berkeley, CA, 4Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA.

N-162  TRFLP Analysis of Anaerobic Debrominating Enrichments from Coastal Sponges, Tunicates and Sediment.

N. A. Lopez, Y-B. Ahn, K. Parisi, M. Häggblom, L. Kerkhof;
Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Highland Park, NJ.

N-163  Richness and Endemicity of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria for the Elfin Forest in Puerto Rico.

C. E. Bonilla-Rivera, J. R. Perez-Jimenez;
Univ. del Turabo, Gurabo, PR.

N-164  The Nitrogenase nifH Gene: Current Status of the Census.

J. C. Gaby, D. H. Buckley;
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

N-165  Evaluating the Diversity of Anoxyphototrophic Bacteria in Young and Mature Tropical Hypersaline Microbial Mats using Culture-Independent Approaches.

F. J. Sanchez-Rivera, C. Rios-Velazquez;
Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR.

N-166  A Phylogenetic Microarray for the Study of Eukaryotic Microbial Communities.

J. K. Magnuson, J. R. Collett, J. E. McDermott, D. E. Culley, R. Tan, K. S. Bruno, S. E. Baker;
Pacific Northwest Natl. Lab., Richland, WA.

N-167  Monitoring of the Microbial Succession of Fermented Alfalfa Haylage under Various Conditions.

S. J. Zinkel, C. Wehnes, A. H. Smith, T. G. Rehberger;
Agtech Products Inc., Waukesha, WI.

N-168  Metagenomic and Single-Cell Genomics of Greenland Glacial Ice.

J. M. Gosses, B. D. Lanoil, S. Han;
Univ. of California, Riverside, CA.

N-169  PCR-Independent Analysis of Active Microbial Communities.

E. L. Brodie1, K. C. Goldfarb1, R. A. Daly2,1, J. Pett-Ridge3, N. H. Nguyen2, T. Z. DeSantis1, Y. M. Piceno1, S. Gross4, M. M. Blackwell4, G. L. Andersen1;
1Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA, 2Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 3Lawrence Livermore Natl. Lab., Livermore, CA, 4Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA.

N-170  Marine Synechococcus ecotypes Are Specifically Associated with Distinct Upwelling and Oligotrophic Regimes.

N. Ahlgren, G. Rocap;
Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA.

N-171  Dominance of Synechococcus clades I and IV during a Coastal Marine Time-Series.

V. Tai1, Q. Ren2, I. T. Paulsen3, B. Palenik1;
1Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA, 2J. Craig Venter Inst., Rockville, MD, 3Macquarie Univ., Sydney, AUSTRALIA.

N-172  Combined Geochemical and Molecular Analyses of Crenarchaeal Assemblages in Columbia River Sediments.

H. M. Simon, J. T. Nurmi, P. G. Tratnyek;
Oregon Hlth. & Sci. Univ., Beaverton, OR.

N-173  Effects of Chlorothalonil and BHT on Bacterial Communities Involved in the Deterioration of Wood Using Terminal Restriction Fragment Length (T-RFLP) Analysis.

G. T. Kirker, S. V. Diehl, M. L. Prewitt, L. C. Mangum;
Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS.

N-174  Investigating the Microbial Communities Associated with Xylophagy in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Panaque nigrolineatus.

D. Smoot1, N. M. Mohamed2, J. A. Nelson1, H. J. Schreier2, J. E. M. Watts1;
1Towson Univ., Towson, MD, 2Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD.

N-175  The Impact of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Bacterial and Archaeal Communities in Decomposing Root Litter.

E. Nuccio1, A. Hodge2, M. Firestone1;
1Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 2Univ. of York, York, UNITED KINGDOM.

N-176  Environmental Assessment of Integron Gene Cassettes Present in a Tar Pond.

J. E. Koenig1, C. Sharp1, Y. Boucher2, W. F. Doolittle1;
1Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS, CANADA, 2Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

N-177  Structure and Functional Analyses of Bacterial Communities from a Brazilian Mangrove Contaminated with Petroleum.

F. A. Paes1,2, V. M. M. Melo1, T. L. Marsh2, J. M. Tiedje2;
1UFC, Fortaleza, BRAZIL, 2Michigan State Univ., East lansing, MI.

N-178  Bacterial Diversity from Seawater Samples at São Paulo Coast Determined by 16S rDNA-PCR.

B. C. de Almeida, E. M. Burbano, C. P. Souza, G. G. Martins, I. N. G. Rivera;
Univ. de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, BRAZIL.

 

144/P. Foodborne Pathogens - I

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

P-000  Rapid Method of Detecting Listeria genus, Salmonella genus, and Campylobacter using Real Time Transcription-Mediated Amplification Assays Targeted to Ribosomal RNA.

M. Reshatoff, E. Ong, J. Ritter, J. Garcia, C. Motta, C. Lewis, M. Fullerton, M. Deras, A. Eusebio, K. Pekny, N. Hedrick, S. Lee, S. McDonough, J. J. Hogan;

P-001  Pathogen Detection in Food Microbiology Laboratories: An Analysis of Proficiency Test Performance, 1999 - 2007.

D. C. Edson;
American Proficiency Inst., Traverse City, MI.

P-002  Impact of Dispersing Agents on Radical Scavenging Activity and Inhibitory Properties of Natural Cold Pressed Terpenless Valencia Orange Oil against Foodborne Microorganisms.

V. I. Chalova, P. G. Crandall, C. O’Bryan, S. C. Ricke;
Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR.

P-003  Inactivation of Inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Poona on Whole Cantaloupe by Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

B. S. M. Mahmoud, R. H. Linton;
Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN.

P-004  Influence of Sodium Chloride and Temperature on Growth Rates of Strains Representing the Genetic Diversity of Listeria monocytogenes.

T. Bergholz, M. Wiedmann;
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

P-005  Transcriptional Analysis of the Growth of Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and a DsigB Mutant Strain Following Exposure to Dinitrophenol or Sodium Arsenite.

B. Lungu1, S. E. Dowd2, A. Muthaiyan1, S. C. Ricke1, M. G. Johnson1;
1Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 2USDA/ARS/LIRU, Lubbock, TX.

P-006  The Impact of Cold Shock Family Proteins (CSPs) in Listeria monocytogenes During Cold Adaptation and Growth at Low Temperatures.

T. Tasara, B. Schmid, R. Stephan;
Inst. for Food Safety and Hygiene, Zurich, SWITZERLAND.

P-007  Contributions of Multiple Transcriptional Regulators to Listeria monocytogenes Virulence and Virulence-Associated Phenotypes.

M. E. Palmer, S. Chaturongakul, S. Raengpradub, Y. Hu, M. Wiedmann, K. J. Boor;
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

P-008  Evaluating the Effect of Environmental Factors on Pathogen Regrowth in Dairy Compost Extract.

J. Kim, X. Jiang;
Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC.

P-009  Transcriptomic and Phenotypic Analyses Suggest Differences in Sigma B Contributions to Stress Response and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes Strains Representing Lineages I, II, IIIA, and IIIB.

H. F. Oliver, M. Wiedmann, K. J. Boor;
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

P-010  Listeria monocytogenes Strains with Invasion Attenuating Mutations in inlA and Strains from Outbreaks of Human Disease Establish Similar Resultant Populations in Host-and Food Associated Environments.

J. L. Corron, J. M. Simpson, S. K. Williams, K. K. Nightingale;
Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO.

P-011  Serotype Identification of Listeria monocytogenes Colombian Isolates by Multiplex PCR.

M. C. Vanegas, A. J. Martinez;
Univ. de los Andes, Bogota, COLOMBIA.

P-012  Comparison of Acid and Oxidative Stress Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes Strains with Sprout Colonization.

L. Gorski, D. Flaherty, J. M. Duhé;
USDA/ARS/WRRC, Albany, CA.

P-013  Survival of Listeria monocytogenes Serotype 4b and Serotype 1/2a Strains in Mixed Culture Biofilms.

Y. Pan1, F. Breidt2;
1North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC, 2USDA/ARS, Raleigh, NC.

P-014  Released Exopolysaccharide (r-EPS) Produced from Lactobacillus acidophilus Reduce Biofilm Formation of Enterohemorrahgic Escherichia coli.

S. Kang1, Y. Kim2, H. Yun2, S. Kim2, S. Oh1;
1Chonnam Natl. Univ., Gwangju, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Korea Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

P-015  Microbiological Analysis of Composts Produced in California as an Amendment for Agricultural Production.

M. W. Shepherd, Jr., S. D. Heringa, J. Kim, R. Singh, X. Jiang;
Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC.

P-016  Comparative Analysis of PFGE and DNA Sequence-Based Subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes.

T. J. Ward1, P. Evans2, G. Tillman3, K. Pupedis3, K. Volpe Sperry4, T. F. Ducey5, L. Graves6, R. Broeker6;
1USDA/ARS, Peoria, IL, 2USDA/FSIS, Washington, DC, 3USDA-FSIS, Athens, GA, 4North Carolina State Lab. of Pub. Hlth., Raleigh, NC, 5USDA/ARS, Florence, SC, 6CDC, Atlanta, GA.

P-017  Comparative Genomic Evaluation of Listeria monocytogenes Strains Involved in Invasive and Gastroenteritis Listeriosis Outbreaks.

L. S. Burall, A. R. Datta;
US FDA, Laurel, MD.

P-018  Protein Synthesis and Metabolic Energy Strategies in Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and a DsigB Mutant during Multiple-Nutrient Starvation.

B. Lungu1,2, J. C. Saldivar1, R. P. Story1, S. C. Ricke1, M. G. Johnson1;
1Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 2Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

P-019  Pseudomonas aeruginosa Secretes a Substance that Prevents and Disrupts Listeria Biofilms.

L. E. Davey, H. Schraft;
Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, ON, CANADA.

P-020  Identification of Epidemiologically Relevant SNPs of Listeria Monocytogenes Epidemic Clones using PFGE Banding Patterns and Ligation-Mediated PCR.

Y. Chen, S. Knabel;
Penn State Univ., University Park, PA.

 

145/Q. Aerosols and Air Quality

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

Q-170  Allergic Significance of Airborne Trichoderma harzianum, a Common Microbial Biopesticide.

S. Das1, A. Adhikari2, S. Gupta-Bhattacharya1;
1Bose Inst., Kolkata, INDIA, 2Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.

Q-171  Aerosolization of Fungi, (1Æ3)-b-D Glucan, and Endotoxin from Materials Collected in New Orleans Homes after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

A. Adhikari1, J. Jung2, T. Reponen1, J. S. Lewis3, E. C. DeGrasse3, L. F. Grimsley3, G. L. Chew4, S. A. Grinshpun1;
1Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 2Korea Advanced Inst. of Sci. and Technology, Daejeon, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 3Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA, 4Columbia Univ., New York, NY.

Q-172  The Effect of the Number of Counted Traverses on the Estimation of the Total Spore Count Sampled on a Non-Culturable Slit Impactor.

G. Marchand, Y. Cloutier, C. Pépin, D. Drolet;
Québec Occupational Hlth. and Safety Res. Inst., Montréal, QC, CANADA.

Q-173  Microbial Characterization of Biofilms in Drains and Bioaerosols in Hospital Rooms.

C. Duchaine, Y. Gilbert, M. Veillette;
Ctr. de Recherche de l'Hôpital Laval, Québec, QC, CANADA.

Q-174  Sampling Aerosols of Bacteriophages with Polycarbonate and PTFE Filters.

D. Verreault, G. M. Rousseau, S. Moineau, C. Duchaine;
Univ. Laval, Quebec, QC, CANADA.

Q-175  Microbial Characterization of Bioaerosols in Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations.

M. Rodríguez de Evgrafov, P. Köll, L. K. Baumgartner, M. T. Hernandez, D. N. Frank, N. R. Pace;
Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO.

Q-176  Assessment of Metabolic Activity and Growth Capability of Bacteria in Air.

E-K. Son, V. Krumins, G. Mainelis, D. E. Fennell;
Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ.

Q-177  Workers’ Exposure to Airborne Pathogens in Swine Confinement Buildings of Eastern Canada According to the Production System.

V. Létourneau1, B. Nehmé2, A. Mériaux3, A. Letellier4, D. Massé5, C. Duchaine3,1;
1Univ. Laval, Sainte-Foy, QC, CANADA, 2CHUL, Sainte-Foy, QC, CANADA, 3Hôpital Laval, Sainte-Foy, QC, CANADA, 4Univ. de Montréal, Sainte-Hyacinthe, QC, CANADA, 5Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lennoxville, QC, CANADA.

Q-178  Rapid Detection for Bioaerosol Monitoring Using ATP Bioluminescence, qRT-PCR or Real Time Mediated Amplification.

K. S. Souza, M. Aysola, S. Rigby, J. Broe;
Millipore Corp., Bedford, MA.

 

146/Q. Biodegradation of Lignin and Hydrocarbons

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

Q-179  Sequence Analysis and Characterization of Dihydrodiol Dehydrogenase Gene in Sphingomonas paucimobilis var. EPA505.

J. Jalili;
Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC.

Q-180  Sequencing and Analysis of PAH Degrading Dioxygenases in Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA505.

R. Persad, T. A. Hughes;
Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC.

Q-181  Sequence and Protein Expression of the Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzyme 2-Hydroxy-2H-chromene-2-carboxylate Isomerase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA505.

A. K. Brown, T. A. Hughes;
Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC.

Q-182  Isolation and Characterization of Fungal Strains for Bio-decomposition of Plant Wastes.

L. Singh1,2;
1Delhi Univ., Delhi, INDIA, 2Thirdwave Biotech Pte. Ltd., Singapore, SINGAPORE.

Q-183  Isolation and Heterologous Expression of Manganese Peroxidase Gene from Lentinula edodes.

I. S. W. Kwok, W. W. Y. Chum, T. C. H. Au, H. S. Kwan;
The Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, HONG KONG.

Q-184  The Effect of Phenanthrene and Fluoranthene Addition on the Bacterial Communities Present in Unexposed and Pre-Exposed Soils.

R. J. Grant1, L. M. Muckian2, N. J. W. Clipson2, E. M. Doyle2;
1Napier Univ., Edinburgh, UNITED KINGDOM, 2Univ. Coll., Dublin, IRELAND.

Q-185  Isolation of a Phenanthrene-Degrading Acidovorax Strain and Identification of Associated Genetic Elements.

D. R. Singleton, L. Guzman Ramirez, M. D. Aitken;
Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.

Q-186  Diversity of Naphthalene-Degrading Bacteria in an Aged, PAH-Contaminated Soil Identified by Stable-Isotope Probing.

M. D. Jones, D. R. Singleton, M. D. Aitken;
Univ. of North Carolina Sch. of Pub. Hlth., Chapel Hill, NC.

Q-187  Genomic Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation in Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1.

S-J. Kim, O-G. Kweon, R. C. Jones, R. D. Edmondson, C. E. Cerniglia;
US FDA Natl. Ctr. for Toxicological Res., Jefferson, AR.

Q-188  Investigation of the Molecular Mechanisms for Phenanthrene Degradation in Burkholderia sp. strain Ch1-1.

J. Zhao, W. J. Hickey;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

Q-189  Colonization and Remediation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Contaminated River Sediment using Pleurotus ostreatus.

G. R. Bosiljcic, M. D. Gacura, C. G. Johnston;
Youngstown State Univ., Youngstown, OH.

Q-190  A Characterization of the Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon Microbes Present in Sediment of a Northeastern US River Impacted by Historical Manufactured Gas Plant Operations.

A. Consiglio, L. Houghton-Robinson, A. Hollar, D. Napsey, C. Johnson, C. Magnuson, D. Junge, L. A. Launen;
Keene State Coll., Keene, NH.

Q-191  Comparison of Benzo[a]Pyrene Degradation by Bacterial and Fungal Cultures in Liquid Medium.

C. Machín-Ramírez1,2, D. Morales-Guzmán1, K. P. Mayolo-Deloisa2, F. Martínez-Morales1, M. Trejo-Hernández1;
1Ctr. de Investigación en Biotecnología. Univ. Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Cuernavaca Morelos, MEXICO, 2Facultad de Ciencias Químicas e Ingeniería, Cuernavaca Morelos, MEXICO.

Q-192  Differential Degradation of Crude Petroleum Fractions by Strains of Candida parapsilosis Isolated from Tropical Oil-Bearing Environment.

S. A. Adebusoye1, M. O. Ilori1, G. O. Oyetibo1, O. S. Obayori1, A. E. Omotayo1, O. Ajidahun1, C. James1, O. K. Adekeye2;
1Univ. of Lagos, Lagos, NIGERIA, 2Conoil PLC, Lagos, NIGERIA.

Q-193  Toluene in Crude Oil Is the Dominant Electron Donor for Denitrifying Bacteria in a Low Temperature Oil Reservoir Receiving Nitrate.

A. J. Lambo, S. Larter, G. Voordouw;
Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CANADA.

Q-194  Anaerobic Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) and tert-Butyl Alcohol (TBA) Biodegradation under Shifting Geochemical Conditions both in Situ and with Novel, Anaerobic Liquid Enrichment Cultures.

N. Wei, K. T. Finneran;
Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL.

Q-195  A Comparative Analysis of In Situ BTEX Degraders at Different LUST Sites Using Stable Isotope Probing.

W. Sun1, S. Xie2, A. M. Cupples1;
1Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI, 2Peking Univ., Beijing, CHINA.

Q-196  Roles of Microbial Communities in the Sequential Chemical and Biological Treatment Process for Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Soils.

J-S. Bae1, J-H. Choi1, S-G. Kim2, J-H. Kim3, J-S. So4, S-C. Kang5, S-C. Koh1;
1Korea Maritime Univ., Busan, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Quality Environmental Solution Inc., Ulsan, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 3Inst. of Hlth. and Environment, Changwon, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 4Inha Univ., Incheon, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 5Daegu Univ., Gyeongsan, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

Q-197  Meta-Cleavage Pathways Expressed in Metagenomic Libraries from Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soil.

J. Josefiova1, H. Junca2, D. H. Pieper2, M. V. Brennerova1;
1Inst. of Microbiology, Prague, CZECH REPUBLIC, 2AG Biodegradation, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Braunschweig, GERMANY.

Q-198  Use of Co-Substrates and Inhibitors to Investigate Anaerobic MTBE Degradation.

L. K. G. Youngster1, P. Somsamak2, M. M. Häggblom1;
1Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ, 2Kasetsart Univ., Bangkok, THAILAND.

Q-199  Sphingomonas BPH, a Component of a Consortium Enriched on Bitumen, Cleaves Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon Rings.

C. Milliken1, W. Jones1, C. Berry1, W. Simpson2, F. Maddox1, B. W. Smith1, R. L. Brigmon1;
1Savannah River Natl. Lab., Aiken, SC, 2South Carolina State Univ., Orangeburg, SC.

 

147/Q. Microbiology of Wastes and Waste Treatment - I

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

Q-200  Effect of the Addition of Autoclaved and Non-autoclaved Grass on the Bacterial Diversity in Sulphate Removing Bioreactors.

L. M. Burke1, S. N. Venter2, G. N. van Blerk3, H. A. Greben1;
1CSIR, Pretoria, SOUTH AFRICA, 2Univ. of Pretoria, Pretoria, SOUTH AFRICA, 3ERWAT, Johannesburg, SOUTH AFRICA.

Q-201  LAS-Response of Bacteria Isolated from Sediments of Some Detergent-Effluent Polluted Water Bodies in Ilorin, Nigeria.

T. M. Kayode-Isola1, E. T. I. Kehinde2, A. B. Olayemi2, S. Awe2;
1Adeniran Ogunsanya Coll. of Ed., Lagos, NIGERIA, 2Environmental and Pub. Hlth. Res. (EPHR) Lab.,Univ. of Ilorin, Ilorin, NIGERIA.

Q-202  Colonization of Tire Shreds by Bacteria and the Effect of Tire Shred Leachate on Bacterial Growth.

R. Vukanti, M. Crissman, A. A. Leff, L. G. Leff;
Kent State Univ., Kent, OH.

Q-203  The Effect of Environmental Selection Mechanisms on Microbial Ecological Succession During Refuse Decomposition.

B. F. Staley, F. L. de los Reyes III, M. A. Barlaz;
North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC.

Q-204  Microbial Function and Resilience during Shock Loading of Highly Degradable Substrates into Solid Waste.

B. F. Staley, J. S. So, F. L. de los Reyes III, M. A. Barlaz;
North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC.

Q-205  Immobilized White Rot Fungi System Enhanced Dye Degradation under Non-Sterile Condition.

D. Gao1,2,3, Y. Zeng1, X. Wen3, Y. Qian3;
1Northeast Forestry Univ., Harbin, CHINA, 2Harbin Inst. of Technology, Harbin, CHINA, 3Tsinghua Univ., Beijing, CHINA.

Q-206  Differential Changes in Microbial Communities during Bioremediation of Fuel Contaminated Desert Mining Soils in the Atacama Desert.

A. Godoy-Faúndez1,2, B. Antizar-Ladislao3, L. Reyes-Bozo2, C. Sáez-Navarrete2;
1Univ. Andrés Bello, Santiago, CHILE, 2Pontificia Univ. Católica de Chile, Santiago, CHILE, 3Univ. of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UNITED KINGDOM.

Q-207  Multigene Analysis to Elucidate Organisms Involved in Cr Bioreduction.

M. Hadi1, R. Chakraborty2, Y. Light2, J. L. Fortney2, R. Meagher2, A. P. Arkin2, T. C. Hazen2, A. K. Singh1;
1Sandia Natl. Lab., Livermore, CA, 2Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA.

Q-208  Biosorption of Ru and Ir by a Bacterial Biomass in Industrial Wastewater Produced from an Acetic Acid Manufacturing Plant.

S. Choi, S. Won, Y-S. Yun;
Chonbuk Natl. Univ., Jeonju, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

Q-209  Characterization of the Heterotrophic Bacteria in an Industrial Organic Biofilter with Removal of High Load Ammonia Gas.

J-F. Vermette1, J. Laperrière2, M. Sirois1;
1Univ. Quebec, Trois-Rivieres, QC, CANADA, 2Norsk Hydro Canada Inc., Becancour, QC, CANADA.

Q-210  The Use of Immobilized Methanotrophic Bacteria for Biodegradation of Landfill Methane Emissions.

B. Adams1, F. Besnard1, L. Talmadge1, J. Bogner2, J. Oliver1, H. Hilger1;
1Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC, 2Landfills +, Inc., Wheaton, IL.

Q-211  Biogas Production as a New Trend of Alternative Energy in Brazilian Great Cities.

L. C. M. das Neves, C. F. M. Souza, M. Ishii, T. C. V. Penna;
Univ. of São Paulo, São Paulo, BRAZIL.

Q-212  Comparison of PLC/PRF/5 and BGM Cell Lines for the Detection of Adenoviruses and Enteroviruses in Biosolids.

N. M. Patel, N. Castro, P. Gundy, C. P. Gerba, I. L. Pepper;
Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

Q-213  Evidence for the Offsite Transport of Pathogen Indicator Bacteria Associated with Land-Application of Biosolids.

M. A. Esseili1, V. Sigler1, I. I. Kassem1, K. A. Esseili2;
1Univ. of Toledo, Toledo, OH, 2Lebanese Univ., Hadath, LEBANON.

Q-214  Phylogenetic Analysis of the Microbial Communities in a Novel Anaerobic Digester Treating Food Processing Wastes.

M. Nelson1, A. Vent1, F. Schanbacher1, M. Morrison1,2, Z. Yu1;
1The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH, 2CSIRO Australia, St Lucia, AUSTRALIA.

Q-215  Culture-Based and Molecular Methods to Determine the Fate of Selected Pathogens when Added as Cross-Contamination Inocula into Space-Mission Simulated Food Trash Compartment Waste.

M. P. Hummerick, M. N. Birmele, J. T. Richards, R. F. Strayer, M. S. Roberts;
Dynamac Corp., Kennedy Space Center, FL.

Q-216  Microbial Community Profiling of Stored Space-Shuttle Food Waste Extracts.

M. N. Birmele, J. T. Richards, M. P. Hummerick, R. F. Strayer, M. S. Roberts;
Dynamac Corp., Kennedy Space Center, FL.

Q-217  Influence of Sugar Industry Effluents on Changes in Soil Enzymatic Activity.

M. Nagaraju, G. Narasimha (SVU), V. Rangaswamy (SKU);
Natl. P.G. Coll., Nandyal, INDIA.

Q-218  Effects of Borax Treatment on Hydrogen Sulfide Emissions and Sulfate Reducing Bacteria in Stored Swine Manure.

C. Spence1, T. R. Whitehead1, M. A. Cotta1, S. M. Hengemuele2, R. von Bernuth2, M. T. Yokoyama2;
1USDA/ARS/NCAUR, Peoria, IL, 2Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

 

148/Q. Pathogens in Environmental Sources

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

Q-219  Drought and Storm Impacts on Loading of Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. in a Georgia Coastal Plain Watershed.

G. Martin1, D. Cole2,1, E. K. Lipp1;
1Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2Georgia Dept. of Pub. Hlth., Atlanta, GA.

Q-220  Seasonal and Spatial Prevalence of Thermophilic Campylobacters in Four Agriculture Watersheds across Canada.

I. U. H. Khan1, V. Gannon2, R. Kent3, W. Koning4, D. Lapen5, A. Loughborough1, S. McFadyen6, M. Meunier3, J. Miller7, N. Neumann8, R. Phillips3, H. Shreier9, E. Topp10, E. van Bochove11, T. A. Edge1;
1Environment Canada, Burlington, ON, CANADA, 2Pub. Hlth. Agency of Canada, Lethbridge, AB, CANADA, 3Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON, CANADA, 4Alberta Environment, Calgary, AB, CANADA, 5Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON, CANADA, 6Hlth. Canada, Ottawa, ON, CANADA, 7Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB, CANADA, 8Alberta Provincial Lab. for Pub. Hlth. (Microbiology), Calgary, AB, CANADA, 9Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CANADA, 10Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, CANADA, 11Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Quebec, ON, CANADA.

Q-221  A Multi-Year Cryptosporidium Source Tracking Study in the Wissahickon Creek Watershed.

K. L. Jellison, A. E. Lynch, J. M. Ziemann;
Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA.

Q-222  Detection of Giardia duodenalis Assemblages and Human-Specific Bacteroides Fecal Markers in Sewage-Polluted Waters from Caracas, Venezuela.

L. J. Querales, L. C. Caraballo, H. Takiff, W. Q. Betancourt;
Inst. Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC), Caracas, VENEZUELA.

Q-223  Seasonal Variation of Multiple Antibiotic Resistant Enterococcus Species in Waters and Sediments of Barceloneta-Manatí, Puerto Rico.

N. J. Rodríguez, B. R. Zaidi;
Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PUERTO RICO.

Q-224  Detection and Characterization of Waterborne Gastroenteritis Viruses in Urban Sewage and Sewage-Polluted River Waters in Caracas, Venezuela.

J. Rodriguez-Diaz, L. Caraballo, E. Vizzi, F. Liprandi, H. Takiff, W. Q. Betancourt;
Venezuelan Inst. for Sci. Res., Caracas, VENEZUELA.

Q-225  Campylobacter and Salmonella Infections in Michigan: Evaluation of Seasonal and Geographic Trends in Reporting.

T. J. M. Onifade, J. B. Kaneene;
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

Q-226  Population Structure and Genetic Relatedness of Salmonella Associated with Cladophora in Lake Michigan.

M. N. Byappanahalli1, S. Ishii2, R. Sawdey2, D. A. Shively1, J. Ferguson2, R. L. Whitman1, M. J. Sadowsky2;
1US Geological Survey, Porter, IN, 2Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.

Q-227  Determination of Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Enterococcus sp. Isolated from West Coast Public Recreational Waters in Puerto Rico.

E. Vazquez-Rivera, L. Lebron-Marrero, R. Ramirez-Ramos, Y. Lizardi-Gerena, K. Malave-Llamas, N. M. Rodriguez-Bonano;
Univ. del Este, Carolina, PUERTO RICO.

Q-228  Identification of Antibiotic Resistant Heterotrophic Bacteria from Recreational Water Samples.

R. Ramirez-Ramos, E. Vazquez-Rivera, L. Lebron-Marrero, Y. Lizardi-Gerena, K. Malave-Llamas, N. M. Rodriguez-Bonano;
Univ. del Este, Sch. of Sci. and Technology, Carolina, PUERTO RICO.

Q-229  Pathogen Measurements in the St. Lucie River Estuary.

H. Solo-Gabriele1, A. Abdelzaher1, M. Wright1, Y. Deng1, C. Ortega1, L. Stark2;
1Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, 2Florida Dept. of Hlth., Tampa, FL.

Q-230  Bacterial Pathogens in the Rio Grande Basin.

K. L. Sternes, K. Little, D. Sauerzopf;
Sul Ross State Univ., Alpine, TX.

Q-231  Novel Francisella Strains Isolated from Natural Water Sources in Utah.

K. E. Kesterson1, C. A. Whitehouse2, M. Wolcott2;
1Dugway Proving Ground, Dugway, UT, 2USAMRIID, Fort Detrick, MD.

Q-232  Growth and Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Soil Organic Matter.

A. Christie1, S. Vilain1, B. Voigt2, S. Gibson1, D. Francis1, M. Hecker2, V. S. Brozel1;
1South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD, 2Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ., Greifswald, GERMANY.

Q-233  Evaluation of Intimin and Bundle-Forming Pilus in Environmental Escherichia coli.

L. Bauer, E. W. Alm;
Central Michigan Univ., Mount Pleasant, MI.

Q-234  Plasmid Profile and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of E. coli 0157:H7 Isolated from Human and Environmental Sources in Lagos Area of Nigeria.

O. O. Aboaba1, S. I. Smith2, H. T. Goodluck2, P. G. Odeigha1;
1Univ. of Lagos, Lagos, NIGERIA, 2Nigerian Inst. of Med. Res., Lagos, NIGERIA.

Q-235  Screening Human and Non-Human Specimens for Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and Typhoid Organisms in Benin-City, Nigeria.

A. O. Ekundayo, J. O. Isibor;
Ambrose Alli Univ., Ekpoma, NIGERIA.

Q-236  Monitoring the Pathogenicity and Transport Behavior of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica spp. in Packed Bed Column Systems.

B. Z. Haznedaroglu, S. L. Walker;
Univ. of California, Riverside, CA.

Q-237  Occurrence of Helicobacter spp. DNA in the Coastal Environment of the Caribbean Sea.

M. A. García-Amado1, M. Fernández2, M. Contreras1, L. Bozo-Hurtado2, H. Rojas1, J. Alfonso1, Y. Astor3, F. Muller-Karger4, F. Michelangeli1, P. Suárez2;
1Inst. Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Miranda, VENEZUELA, 2Univ. Simón Bolívar, Miranda, VENEZUELA, 3Fundacion La Salle de Ciencias Naturales, Estación de Investigaciones Marinas de Margarita, Isla de Margarita, VENEZUELA, 4Univ. of South Florida, Coll. of Marine Sci., St. Petersburg, FL.

Q-238  Regrowth of Opportunistic Pathogens and Indicators in Reclaimed Water Systems.

P. K. Jjemba1, L. A. Weinrich1, W. Cheng1, E. Giraldo2, M. W. LeChevallier2;
1American Water, Delran, NJ, 2American Water, Voorhees, NJ.

Q-239  Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Biofilms on Livestock Watering Trough Materials.

K. L. Cook1, J. S. Britt2, M. J. Rothrock, Jr.1, J. K. Sorrell2;
1USDA/ARS, Bowling Green, KY, 2Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY.

Q-240  Extending Water Supplies through Treatment of Impaired Rio Grande River Water.

E. L. Espinoza1, N. F. Garcia1, A. J. Tarquin2, G. D. Di Giovanni1;
1Texas AgriLife Res., Texas A&M Univ., El Paso, TX, 2Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX.

Q-241  Distribution of the viuB Gene among Clinical and Environmental Vibrio vulnificus Strains Does Not Predict Virulence.

M. Evans, V. Vedam-Mai, P. Thiaville, P. Gulig, A. C. Wright;
Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

Q-242  Characterization of Enterobacter sakazakii Isolates from Different Environments.

A. Cruz1, E. Salinas1, L. Martínez1, B. Gonzalez2, C. Eslava3, C. Amábile-Cuevas4, I. Rosas1;
1Facultad de Medicina-Ctr. de Ciencias de la Atmósfera, UNAM, Mexico, MEXICO, 2Fisiología Celular, UNAM, Mexico, MEXICO, 3Facultad de Medicina, UNAM, Mexico, MEXICO, 4Fundación Lusara, Mexico, MEXICO.

Q-243  Assessment of Mycoflora in Recreational Parks in Enugu Metropolis, Nigeria.

F. O. Tasie1,2, F. A. Okafor3, U. O. George-Okafor1,2;
1P.M.B, Enugu, NIGERIA, 2Enugu State Univ. of Sci. and Technology, Enugu, NIGERIA, 3Alabama A&M Univ., Normal, AL.

Q-244  Recovery of Bacillus thuringiensis and Insect Toxic Related Strains from Forest Soil.

P. A. W. Martin, D. E. Gundersen-Rindal, M. B. Blackburn;
USDA, Beltsville, MD.

Q-245  Detection of Burkholderia Species in Soil Contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

K. A. Ruegg, G. M. Colores;
Central Michigan Univ., Mt. Pleasant, MI.

Q-246  Survey of Pathogenic Bacteria in Restrooms along Interstate Highways in the Southwest United States.

K. L. Sternes, E. A. Sternes;
Sul Ross State Univ., Alpine, TX.

Q-247  Occurrence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Fire Stations.

J. D. Sexton, K. A. Reynolds;
Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

Q-248  Contact Lens Wear and Mycotic Keratitis Outbreak 2005-2006: Why Fusarium?

D. G. Ahearn1, S. Zhang1, R. D. Stulting2;
1Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA, 2Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA.

 

149/S. DNA Viruses

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

S-001 The Role of Inflammation in BK Polyomavirus Replication in Vitro.

M. E. Seamone, D. A. Muruve;
Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CANADA.

S-002 Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions between the Varicella-Zoster Virus DNA Encapsidation Proteins ORF30 and ORF45/42, the Putative Terminase Subunits.

D. M. Nicolosi, B. Goshorn, R. J. Visalli;
Indiana Univ., Fort Wayne, IN.

S-003 Further Evidence to Support Apoptosis in CSSV Infected Cocoa, and to Confirm the Cotylodens as CSSV-Rich.

H. K. Dzahini-Obiatey1,2, R. T. V. Fox1;
1Univ. of Reading, Reading, UNITED KINGDOM, 2Cocoa Research Inst. of Ghana, Akim Tafo, GHANA.

S-004 Effects of the Adenovirus Type 5 Tripartite Leader Sequence with Partial and Complete Exons on mRNA Transport, Stability and Translation in Chinese hamster Ovary Cells.

M. A. El-Mogy, Y. Haj-Ahmad;
Brock Univ., St. Catharines, ON, CANADA.

S-005 Adenovirus E4 ORF4 Affects Redistribution of the Cellular DNA Repair Protein MDC1 in E4 Mutant Infections.

M. D. Davila, J. P. Clark, E. Bridge;
Miami Univ., Oxford, OH.

S-006 Does the Method of Passaging AeDNV Densonucleosis Virus Effect Viral Pathogenicity?

A. E. Wieczorek, E. Suchman, J. Carlson;
Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO.

S-007 B1 Human Adenoviruses Express a Viroporin-Like Protein from the Polymorphic E3-10.9K ORF.

K. M. Frietze, A. E. Kajon;
Lovelace Respiratory Res. Inst., Albuquerque, NM.

S-008 Endothelial Cells Support Persistent Gammaherpesvirus Infection.

A. L. Suarez, L. F. van Dyk;
Univ. of Colorado Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Aurora, CO.

S-009 Involvement of MCAF1 in the Synergistically Activation of the Epstein-Barr Virus Promoters by Rta and Zta.

L-K. Chang1, J-Y. Chuang2, C-W. Chang1, I. Takaya3, N. Mitsuyoshi3, S-T. Liu2;
1Natl. Taiwan Univ., Taipei, TAIWAN, 2Chang-Gung Univ., Taoyuan, TAIWAN, 3Kumamoto Univ., Kumamoto, JAPAN.

S-010 Analysis of Pepper Golden Mosaic Virus Mo and DI Strains Maps a DI-Associated Recovery Phenotype to the 5' Upstream Region of BL1, and Reveals that the DI Strain is in Low Abundance in the Phloem.

J. K. Brown, A. M. Idris;
Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

S-011 siRNA Targeting LMP1-Induced Apoptosis in EBV-Positive Gastric Epithelial Cells is Associated with Inhibition of BCL-2 Gene Expression and Promotion of Bax Gene Expression.

Y. Feng1, X. Wang1, Y. Wang1, C. Zhao2, B. Luo1;
1Qingdao Univ. Med. Coll., Qingdao, CHINA, 2Magee-Womens Hosp., Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

 

150/Y. Bioterrorism Preparedness

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

Y-005  A Method for Growing Bacillus anthracis in a Spore-Free Culture for Use in Molecular Applications Outside of the Bio Safety Level 3 Environment.

D. S. King1, V. A. Luna1, A. Cannons1, P. Amuso2, J. Cattani1;
1Ctr. for Biological Defense, Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL, 2Florida Dept of Hlth., Tampa, FL.

Y-006  Comparison of Physical Properties of Anthrax Spore Surrogates.

A. L. Boyko1, J. C. Brown1, R. Floyd1, Y. J. Choi2, T. J. M. Luo2, K. T. Madhusudhan1;
1Clean Earth Technologies, LLC, Winston-Salem, NC, 2North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC.

Y-007  Old Data Provides New Dose-Response Curves for Bacillus anthracis.

B. Thran1, R. Lee1, S. Taft2, T. Nichols2, D. McKean2;
1USACHPPM, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 2US EPA/NHSRC, Cincinnati, OH.

Y-009  Aptamer-Based Electrochemical Biowarfare Sensor.

J. S. Gulledge1, A. Bogomolova2, M. Aldissi2, E. Komarova2, K. Reber2;
1Univ. of South Florida Ctr. for Biological Defense, Tampa, FL, 2Fractal Systems, Inc., Safety Harbor, FL.

Y-010  Isolation and Characterization of Specific Oligopepetide Probes for Detection of Bacillus anthracis Spores.

I-H. Chen, J. M. Barbaree, S-J. Suh;
Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL.

Y-011  Integration of Benchmark Dose and Physiologically-Based BioKinetic (PBBK) Modeling to Derive Heath Hazard Predictors for Biothreat Agents.

G. Diamond, M. Odin, S. Massulik, M. Lumpkin, M. E. Coleman, P. McGinnis;
Syracuse Res. Corp., Syracuse, NY.

Y-012  Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay (LAMP) for the Rapid Detection of Bacillus anthracis.

J. Narayanan, L. Rose, V. R. Hill;
CDC, Atlanta, GA.

Y-013  Detection and Screening of Francisella tularensis and its Subspecies Using a Large-Scale, Comparative Genomics Approach.

L. Jiang1, A. M. Phillippy2, K. S. McIver2, M. Cai1, S. L. Salzberg2, R. R. Colwell2, I. T. Knight1;
1Canon U.S. Life Sci., INC., Rockville, MD, 2Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD.

Y-014  Development of a Photonic Biosensor Assay to Diagnose Francisella tularensis Infection.

T. J. Inzana, K. Cooper, A. B. Bandara, A. Wang;
Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State Univ., Blacksburg, VA.

Y-015  Growth of Yersinia pestis at 40C.

S. Torosian1, A. Margolin1, P. Regan2, T. Doran3;
1Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, 2US FDA, Winchester, MA, 3Massachusetts Dept. of Pub. Hlth., Jamaica Plain, MA.

 

151/Z. Detection and Characterization of Animal and Zoonotic Pathogens

10:30 am - Noon

Poster Hall

Z-001  Cloning, Characterization and Expression of a FK506 Binding Protein from Edwardsiella ictaluri.

H-Y. Yeh, P. H. Klesius;
USDA/ARS/AAHRU, Auburn, AL.

Z-002  Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Avian Rotaviruses Originally Detected in Enteric Samples Collected from Commercial Turkey Flocks.

J. M. Day, E. Spackman, M. J. Pantin-Jackwood, L. Zsak;
USDA, Athens, GA.

Z-003  Oral Distribution of Pseudorabies Viral DNA in Feral Swine.

E. C. Hahn, III, B. A. Fadl-Alla;
Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL.

Z-004  Isolation, Culturing and Characterisation of Spirochetes from Contagious Ovine Digital Dermatitis Outbreaks in Ireland.

G. P. Sayers, P. X. Marques, S. Cooney, J. E. Nally;
Univ. College, Dublin, IRELAND.

Z-005  Identification and Characterization of New Virulence Associated Factors of Haemophilus parasuis.

M. Sack, N. Baltes;
Univ. of Vet. Med., Hannover, GERMANY.

Z-006  White Blood Cell Borne Chlamydial Prevalence among Alpaca, Sheep, and Goat Cohorts in Western Massachusetts.

E. Clark, S. Purdy, W. Webley, E. Stuart;
Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

Z-007  Discovery and Prevalence of a Novel Sea Turtle Circovirus Using Metagenomic Sequencing.

F. Ng1, C. Manire2, M. Breitbart1;
1Univ. of South Florida, Saint Petersburg, FL, 2Mote Marine Lab., Sarasota, FL.

Z-008  Study of Torque Teno Virus Natural Dissemination in a Swine Herd.

M-J. Gagné, D. Leblanc, A. Houde, J. Brassard;
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CANADA.

Z-009  Molecular Analysis and Diversity of Clostridium difficile among Swine Herds in the Midwest.

A. Baker, E. Davis, T. Rehberger;
Agtech Products Inc., Waukesha, WI.

Z-010  Genotypic Variation in APEC Isolates from Healthy Turkey Poults across the United States.

F. Lago, G. Siragusa, D. Karunakaran, T. Rehberger;
Agtech Products, Inc., Waukesha, WI.

Z-011  Real-Time PCR Assay for Brucella suis and a New Strategy for Target Identification.

F. F. Roberto, J. M. Barnes, D. T. Newby;
Idaho Natl. Lab., Idaho Falls, ID.

Z-012  Highly Clonal Relationships among Isolates of Clostridium septicum Associated with Gangrenous Infections of Poultry.

A. P. Neumann, T. G. Rehberger;
Agtech Products, Inc., Waukesha, WI.

Z-013  Prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus intermedius in Domesticated Pets from Southern Louisiana.

T. Rachal1, K. Ghislain1, A. Corbin1, B. Melius2, P. Seeman3, R. Nathaniel1;
1Nicholls State Univ., Thibodaux, LA, 2Metairie Small Animal Hosp., Metairie, LA, 3Ridgefield Animal Hosp., Thibodaux, LA.

Z-014  Molecular Characterization and Genetic Diversity of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale Strains Isolated in Taiwan.

C-H. Chou, S-Y. LIN, H-J. Tsai;
Natl. Taiwan Univ., Taipei City, TAIWAN.

Z-015  Rapid Real-Time PCR for Detection of Klebsiella pneumoniae and the rmpA Gene Target responsible for the Hypermucoviscosity Phenotype: Comparison with Culture for the Screening of African Green monkeys.

E. Selby, L. Hartman, C. Whitehouse, S. Coyne, J. Jaissle, N. Twenhafel, R. Burke, D. Kulesh;
USAMRIID, Fort Detrick, MD.

Z-016  Investigation of Salmonella Infection in Household and Stray Dogs of Central Taiwan.

T-H. Chen1, Y-C. Chang2,3, C-W. Liao1, Y-C. Wang3;
1The Graduate Inst. of Vet. Pub. Hlth., Natl. Chung Hsing Univ., Taichung, TAIWAN, 2China Med. Univ., Taichung, TAIWAN, 3Natl. Chung Hsing Univ., Taichung, TAIWAN.

Z-017  An Immunogenic Lipoprotein of Campylobacter jejuni, Is Required for the Adherence to Host Epithelial Cells and Colonization of the Intestinal Tract of Chickens.

M. Fukuda, B. Jeon, O. Sahin, Q. Zhang;
Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA.

Z-018  Antimicrobial Susceptibility among MRSA Isolates from People and Companion Animals from the Same Geographical Region and its Implications for Empiric Antimicrobial Treatment.

S. Sanchez, C. Smith, B. Wheeler, M. A. Jensen;
The Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

Z-019  Genotypic Characterization of O113 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains Isolated from Healthy Cattle of Northwest Sub-Region, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

C. Matheus-Guimarães1, M. F. L. Barros1, R. S. Sant'Anna1, D. P. Alves1, T. L. Z. Vargas2, J. R. C. Andrade2, A. M. F. Cerqueira1;
1Univ. Federal Fluminense, Niterói, BRAZIL, 2Univ. do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL.

Special Award Lecture

152. Eli Lilly & Co. Research Award 

10:45 am - 11:45 am

205 A

10:45 am Eli Lilly & Co. Research Award: From Iron Oxides to Infections.

D. Newman;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

Student Oral Presentation

153. Undergraduate and Graduate Research Fellows
Presentations - III 

10:45 am - 11:45 am

258 A

Convener:

S. McIntire;
Texas Woman’s Univ., Denton, TX.

Presentations:

10:45 am Mapping Regions Influencing the ATPase Activity of the DEAD-box Protein Prp5p.

A. L. Hermes;
Univ. of New Mexico Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Albuquerque, NM.

11:00 am Hepatitis C Virus Trafficking in Infected Cells.

R. Yoon;
Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

11:15 am The Effect of Transcription Level on Mutation Spectrum at the CAN1 Locus in Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

N. E. Schoenly;
Saint Michael's Coll., Colchester, VT.

11:30 am A Single RNaseIII Domain Gene Appears to Function as a Dicer Enzyme in Entamoeba histolytica.

J. M. Pompey;
Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA.

Student Oral Presentation

154/AA. Genetics and Biochemistry of Parasites 

10:45 am - Noon

252 A

Convener:

M. Parsons;
Seattle Biomedical Res. Inst., Seattle, WA.

Presentations:

10:45 am Transformation of Vittaforma corneae (Phylum Microsporidia) by Electroporation of Fluorescein-Labeled dsRNA.

E. S. Didier;
Tulane Natl. Primate Res. Ctr., Covington, LA.

11:00 am Chimeric Gene Silencing Strategy to Study the Multiple Mitochondrial DNA Polymerases of Trypanosoma brucei.

A. De;
Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

11:15 am Analysis of the 3' UTRs of Hexokinases in Trypanosoma brucei.

A. C. Sayce;
Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC.

11:30 am Purification of Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase Replication Complexes from Trypanosoma brucei.

J. Concepción;
Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

11:45 am Subtilisin-Like Proteases of Cryptosporidium parvum.

J. W. Wanyiri;
Tufts-New England Med. Ctr., Boston, MA.

Student Oral Presentation

155/G. Division G Student Oral Presentations 

10:45 am - Noon

052 A

Convener:

R. D. Hardy;
Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr., Dallas, TX.

Presentations:

10:45 am  Identification of the Origin of Replication in the Chromosome of Mycoplasma bovis and Its Use to Construct a Replicative Plasmid 

N. Lee;
Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA.

11:00 am  MG454 Gene Product of Mycoplasma genitalium Provides Resistance to Killing by Organic Hydroperoxides 

S. Saikolappan;
Univ. of Texas Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Edinburg, TX.

11:15 am  Generation and Evaluation of an Attenuated Strain of Mycoplasma pneumoniae

S. M. Szczepanek;
Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

11:30 am  Comparison of Airway Obstruction and Airway Hyperreactivity Induced by Infection with Three Different Strains of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Mice 

C. Techasaensiri;
Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr., Dallas, TX

11:45 am  Sialidase Activity in Mycoplasma canis 

M. May;
Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL

Student Oral Presentation

156/P. Division P Student Oral Presentations - I 

10:45 am - 11:45 am

206 A

Convener:

M. W. Carter;
Silliker, Inc., South Holland, IL.

Presentations:

10:45 am  Contributions of Multiple Transcriptional Regulators to Listeria monocytogenes Virulence and Virulence-Associated Phenotypes

M. Palmer;
Cornell Univ., Freeville, NY.

11:00 am  Listeria monocytogenes Strains with Invasion Attenuating Mutations in inlA and Strains from Outbreaks of Human Disease Establish Similar Resultant Populations in Host-and Food Associated Environments 

J. L. Corron;
Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO. 

11:15 am  Diversity Among Spontaneous Mutants of Listeria monocytogenes Exposed to the Bacteriocin Sakacin P. 

G. T. Tessema;
Norwegian Food Res. Inst. & Norwegian Univ. of Life Sci., Aas, NORWAY

11:30 am  Impact of Changes in Membrane Fluidity on F0F1 ATPase Activity of Listeria monocytogenes 

M. Z. Badaoui Najjar;
Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ.

Special Interest Round Table

Grants from Governments Sources 

Noon - 1:30 pm

204 A

Panel Participants:

D. Drell;
US DOE, Washington, DC.

A. Lichens-Park;
USDA, Washington, DC.

J. Tornow;
NSF, Arlington, VA.

Interested in obtaining Grants from Governments Sources? This round table discussion presented by representatives from various government agencies including DOE, NIH, and USDA will provide you with a chance to hear the latest information on this important area.

 

Student Oral Presentation

157/AA. Host-Parasite Interaction 

1:00 pm - 2:15 pm

252 A

Convener:

K. Kim;
Albert Einstein Coll. of Med., Bronx, NY.

Presentations:

1:00 pm Myeloperoxidase-Induced Oxidative/Nitrosative Stress in Human Chagasic Patients.

M. Dhiman;
Univ. of Texas Med. Branch, Galveston, TX.

1:15 pm Human Pathogenic Cryptosporidium Species Bioanalytical Detection System with Single Oocyst Limit of Detection.

J. T. Connelly;
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

1:30 pm A Study of a Rhomboid Protease in Plasmodium yoelii Using Reverse Genetics.

I. M. Vera;
Albert Einstein Coll. of Med., Bronx, NY.

1:45 pm Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase and Malonyl-CoA Decarboxylase: Gatekeepers of the Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway in Trypanosoma brucei.

P. A. Vigueira;
Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC.

2:00 pm The Role of Intraflagellar Transport in Signaling in Trypanosoma brucei.

L. W. Poole;
Mount Holyoke Coll., South Hadley, MA.

Student Oral Presentation

158. Undergraduate and Graduate Research Fellows
Presentations - IV 

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

258 A

Convener:

Unknown at this time.

Presentations:

1:00 pm CsrA Activates Expression of sdiA, the Gene Encoding the Escherichia coli Homoserine Lactone Receptor.

M. A. Evangelista;
The Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA.

1:15 pm Characterization of Oxylipin Perception in Aspergillus flavus.

K. Fowler;
Western Washington Univ., Bellingham, WA.

1:30 pm Holliday Junctions and other Branched DNA Repair Intermediates Are In Vivo Targets of Bactericidal Peptides.

A. Contreras;
San Diego State Univ., Chula Vista, CA.

1:45 pm Respiratory Syncytial Virus Like-Particle Formation and Characterizations.

J. P. Hedgecock;
Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN.

Special Award Lecture

159. Promega Biotechnology Research Award 

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

258 B

1:00 pm Promega Biotechnology Research Award: Evolution in Computational Biology.

D. J. Lipman;
NIH/NLM/NCBI, Bethesda, MD.

Poster Sessions

160/A. Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Action

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

A-049  Inhibitory Effects of Nisin against Bacillus anthracis Spores.

I. M. Gut, A. M. Prouty, W. A. van der Donk, S. R. Blanke;
Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL.

A-050  Mechanisms of Action of a Citrus Essential Oil Blend against Enterococcus spp.

K. Fisher, C. Phillips;
Univ. of Northampton, Northampton, UNITED KINGDOM.

A-051  Characterization of the Physiological Response of Staphylococcus aureus to the Bactericidal Pyrrolobenzodiazepine Dimer ELB-21.

M. Doyle1, K. Bailey2, D. E. Thurston1,3, P. W. Taylor1;
1Sch. of Pharmacy, London, UNITED KINGDOM, 2Queens Med. Ctr., Nottingham, UNITED KINGDOM, 3Spirogen Ltd, Sch. of Pharmacy, London, UNITED KINGDOM.

A-052  Effect of Goldenseal Leaf Extract on the Multi Drug Resistance Pumps of Staphylococcus aureus.

J. Rangineni, T-r. J. Tzeng;
Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC.

A-053  Characterization of Lactosporin, a Novel Membrane-Active Antimicrobial from Bacillus coagulans, for Control of Gardnerella vaginalis.

S. Riazi, R. E. Wirawan, M. L. Chikindas;
Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ.

A-054  Salt and Osmolyte Effects on Chitosan-Arginine Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Staphylococcus aureus MW-2.

J. Uhrig1, A. Phang1, A. C. Parker1, S. J. Ryan2, S. M. Baker2,3, W. P. Wiesmann2, S. M. Townsend2, P. M. Orwin1;
1California State Univ., San Bernardino, CA, 2BioStarWest, Inc., Claremont, CA, 3Harvey Mudd Coll., Claremont, CA.

A-055  The Importance of ROS Generation on Antimicrobial Activity by Silver Ion.

H-J. Park1, J. Kim1, J. Kim1, J-H. Lee2, J. Yoon1;
1Seoul Natl. Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Pusan Natl. Univ., Pusan, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

A-056  Mistranslation of Membrane Proteins and Two-Component System Activation Trigger Aminoglycoside-Mediated Hydroxyl Radical Formation and Cell Death.

M. A. Kohanski, D. J. Dwyer, J. Wierzbowski, G. Cottarel, J. J. Collins;
Boston Univ., Boston, MA.

A-057  Effect of Thymol on Total Proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Thompson.

R. Di Pasqua1, G. Mamone2, P. Ferranti1, M. Lamberti1, D. Ercolini1, G. Mauriello1;
1Univ. degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Portici, ITALY, 2Istituto di Scienze dell'Alimentazione - Centro Nazionale delle Ricerche, Avellino, ITALY.

A-058  Antimicrobial Activity of the Immobilized Peptide, Cecropin P1: Role of Peptide Orientation on Potency.

S. Arcidiacono, R. Kirby, A. M. Meehan, J. W. Soares;
US Army Natick Soldier Res., Dev., & Eng. Ctr., Natick, MA.

A-059  The Effect of Manuka Honey on the Activity of Bacteriolytic Cell Wall Enzymes in MRSA.

R. E. Jenkins, N. F. Burton, R. A. Cooper;
Univ. of Wales Inst. Cardiff, Cardiff, UNITED KINGDOM.

A-060  The Localisation of a Bacteriolytic Cell Wall Enzyme in MRSA Following Treatment with Manuka Honey.

R. A. Cooper, R. E. Jenkins, N. F. Burton;
Univ. of Wales Inst. Cardiff, Cardiff, UNITED KINGDOM.

A-061  Investigation on the Mode of Action of Oritavancin against Staphylococcus aureus through Transcriptional Profiling.

H. Moisan, M. Pruneau, M. Gattuso, F. Malouin;
Univ. de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, CANADA.

A-062  Variation in the Effect of Exposure to Gatifloxacin on the Metabolic Activities of Different Strains of Clostridium perfringens.

F. Rafii, M. Park, G. Gamboa da Costa;
US FDA, Natl. Ctr. for Toxicological Res., Jefferson, AR.

 

161/B. Microbial Communities

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

B-236  Biofilm Formation by Candida spp. on in vitro Model of Albumin Coated Silica Beads (ACSB).

A. T. Abou Khalifa1, M. El-Azizi1, N. Khardori2;
1German Univ. in Cairo, New Cairo City, EGYPT, 2Southern Illinois Univ. Sch. of Med., Springfield, IL.

B-237  Growth of Anaerobic Clostridium perfringens and Peptoniphilus ivorii in an Aerobic Multi-Species Biofilm Model of Chronic Wounds.

Y. Sun1, S. E. Dowd2, D. Rhoads1, E. Smith1, R. Wolcott1;
1Med. Biofilm Res. Inst., Lubbock, TX, 2USDA ARS, Lubbock, TX.

B-238  Biofilm Formation by Invasive Streptococcus pyogenes Strains.

C. Ferranti, V. Giummarra, G. Tempera, L. S. Roccasalva, G. Bisignano, M. C. Scuderi, P. M. Furneri;
Univ. of Catania, Catania, ITALY.

B-239  The Variability of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Biofilms Is both Strain and Growth Media Dependant.

N. W. Gunther, IV;
USDA/ARS, Wyndmoor, PA.

B-240  Biofilm Formation and Expression of Curli Fibres is Modulated by Cra in Escherichia coli.

S. M. S. Reshamwala, S. B. Noronha;
Indian Inst. of Technology, Bombay, Mumbai, INDIA.

B-241  Effects of Tea Extracts on the Formation of Biofilm and Production of Enterotoxins by Staphylococcus aureus.

J. Cui1,2, S. Jin1,2, M. Yun1, P. Ryu1;
1Res. Inst. of Vibrio Infection and Genome Res. Ctr. for Enteropathogenic Bacteria,Chonnam Univ. Med. Sch., Gwangju, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Ctr. for Biomedical Human Resources, Gwangju, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

B-242  A Novel Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Phenotype Mediated by the Fibronectin Binding proteins, FnBPA and FnBPB.

C. Pozzi1, E. O' Neill1, P. J. Houston1, H. Humphreys2, A. Loughman3, A. D. Robinson4, T. J. Foster3, J. P. O'Gara1;
1Univ. Coll., Dublin, IRELAND, 2Royal Coll. of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, IRELAND, 3Moyne Inst. of Preventive Med., Trinity Coll., Dublin, IRELAND, 4New York Med. Coll., Valhalla, NY.

B-243  Biofilms in Chronic Rhinosinusitis.

J. G. Leid1, A. Gmerek1, L. Neveling1, J. Kofonow1, E. Cope1, A. Sanderson2, D. Healy2, D. Hunsaker2, E. Schwartz1, M. E. Shirtliff3, N. Cohen4, J. Palmer4;
1Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ, 2United States Naval Med. Ctr., San Diego, CA, 3Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, 4Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

B-244  A Bile-Induced Exopolysaccharide Required for Salmonella Biofilm Formation on Gallstone Surfaces.

R. W. Crawford1, D. L. Gibson2, J. S. Gunn1;
1The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH, 2Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CANADA.

B-245  Identification of a Putative Biofilm Associated Protein on the Surface of Gardnerella vaginalis.

J. Patterson, P. Girerd, K. Jefferson;
Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA.

B-246  Extracellular DNA Mediates Intercellular Adhesion in Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae Biofilms.

E. A. Izano, D. Rupani, J. B. Kaplan;
UMDNJ, Newark, NJ.

B-247  The Role of Programmed Cell Death in the Development of Staphylococcal Biofilm.

E. E. Mann, K. C. Rice, J. L. Endres, K. W. Bayles;
Univ. of Nebraska Med. Ctr., Omaha, NE.

B-248  Group A Streptococcus Forms Complex Surface-Attached Communities In Vitro and In Vivo Which Are Suggestive of a Biofilm.

A. L. Roberts, C. D. Doern, R. C. Holder, J. Nelson, W. Hong, W. E. Swords, S. D. Reid;
Wake Forest Univ. Hlth. Sci., Winston-Salem, NC.

B-249  Msa Regulates Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

A. Schwartz, K. Sambanthamoorthy, M. O. Elasri;
Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS.

B-250  Viral Infection of Respiratory Epithelial Surfaces Enhances Adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Moraxella catarrhalis and Is Influenced by the Polymicrobial Environment.

A. Krishnamurthy1, J. M. Kyd1, A. W. Cripps2;
1Central Queensland Univ., Rockhampton, AUSTRALIA, 2Griffith Univ., Gold Coast, AUSTRALIA.

B-251  Regulation of Vibrio cholerae Surface-Dependent Growth by the PTS Phosphotransfer Cascade.

L. Houot, P. I. Watnick;
Children's Hosp., Boston, MA.

B-252  A Novel Type IV Secretion System Is Unique to the Campylobacter fetus subspecies venerealis, and Contributes both to Bacterial Virulence and Conjugative DNA Delivery.

S. Kienesberger1, G. Gorkiewicz2, E. L. Zechner1;
1Inst. of Molecular BioSci., Univ. of Graz, Graz, AUSTRIA, 2Inst. of Pathology, Med. Univ. of Graz, Graz, AUSTRIA.

B-253  Short-Term Antibiotic Treatment Alters the Long-Term Diversity of the Mouse Intestinal Microbiome.

D. A. Antonopoulos1, C. Holmes2, S. M. Huse2, H. G. Morrison2, T. M. Schmidt3, M. L. Sogin2, V. B. Young1;
1The Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2The Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA, 3Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

 

162/B. Physiology and Metabolism of Pathogenic Microorganisms

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

B-254  The Essential Enolase of Staphylococcus aureus is Involved in Autolysis.

Li Zheng, Y. Ji;
Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.

B-255  A Hierarchy of Nickel Trafficking in Helicobacter pylori.

E. L. Benanti, P. T. Chivers;
Washington Univ. Sch. of Med., St. Louis, MO.

B-256  Kinetic Studies of RdxA and FrxA Nitroreductases Involved in Metronidazole- Sensitivity of Helicobacter pylori.

I. N. Olekhnovich, P. S. Hoffman;
Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

B-257  Role of Lgt and Lsp in Maltose Uptake Mediated by Streptococcus mutans Lipoprotein MalE.

T. Arimoto, T. Igarashi;
Showa Univ. Sch. of Dent., Tokyo, JAPAN.

B-258  Identification and Characterization of Moraxella catarrhalis Gene Products Involved in a Truncated Denitrification Pathway.

W. Wang1, A. R. Richardson2, F. C. Fang2, E. J. Hansen1;
1Univ. of Texas Southwestern Med. Ctr, Dallas, TX, 2Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA.

B-259  Role of L-fucose and Resident Commensal Escherichia coli Strains in Inhibiting E. coli EDL933 (O157:H7) Growth in the Mouse Intestine.

S. M. Autieri1, M. P. Leatham1, R. Mercado-Lubo1, D. C. Laux1, T. Conway2, P. S. Cohen1;
1Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, 2Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK.

B-260  Characterization of a Serine/Threonine Kinase in Bacillus anthracis.

K. Bryant, J. Ballard;
Oklahoma Univ. Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Oklahoma City, OK.

B-261  Adaptation of Carbon Metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Mouse Lung Infection.

L. Shi1, C. D. Sohaskey2, R. J. North3, M. L. Gennaro1;
1Pub. Hlth. Res. Inst., Newark, NJ, 2Dept. of Veterans Affairs Med. Ctr., Long Beach, CA, 3Trudeau Inst., Saranac Lake, NY.

B-262  Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase Regulates ABC-Transport in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

R. E. Tyx, A. Hakansson;
Univ. at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.

B-263  Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Succinate Dehydrogenase/Fumarate Reductase Double Mutant is Avirulent and Immunogenic in BALB/c Mice.

R. Mercado-Lubo1, E. J. Gauger2, M. P. Leatham1, T. Conway3, P. S. Cohen1;
1Univ. of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, 2Intervet Inc., Millsboro, DE, 3Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK.

B-264  Assessing the Role of the Hfq Protein in Francisella tularensis.

J. R. Chambers, K. S. Bender;
Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL.

B-265  Phosphoglucomutase of Yersinia pestis Is Required for Autoaggregation and Polymyxin B Resistance.

S. Felek, E. S. Krukonis;
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

B-266  The dsdCXA Locus of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Controls D-Serine Incorporation into Peptidoglycan.

G. A. Baisa1, A. J. Schmidt1,2, R. A. Welch1;
1Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 2Univ. of Iowa, Carver Coll. of Med., Iowa City, IA.

B-267  Discovery of the Degradation Signal for Substrates of the Bacterial Proteasome from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

M. Pearce, J. Ferreyra, H. Darwin;
New York Univ. Med. Sch., New York, NY.

B-268  Proteomics of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 in Response to Cold Stress.

J. D. Shah, D. Chen, J. R. Stevens, B. C. Weimer;
Utah State Univ., Logan, UT.

B-269  Characterization of Bordetella bronchiseptica Strains Requiring Elevated CO2 Levels for Induction of Bvg+ Phase Genes.

M. Liu1, S. Moghadam1, C. A. Cummings1, S. Doulatov1, D. Fujiyama1, A. Jani2, E. Pineda1, J. D. Cherry1, M. Forsyth2, I. Schroeder1, P. A. Cotter2, J. F. Miller1;
1Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA, 2Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA.

B-270  Regulatory Network of Multidrug Transporters Reveals their Physiological Role in Salmonella Virulence.

K. Nishino1,2, A. Yamaguchi1;
1Osaka Univ., Osaka, JAPAN, 2PRESTO, Japan Sci. and Technology Agency, Tokyo, JAPAN.

B-271  Transport of Glycoconjugate-Derived Monosaccharides by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

S. J. King1,2, A. M. Burnaugh1;
1The Res. Inst. at Nationwide Children’s Hosp., Columbus, OH, 2The Ohio State Univ. Coll. of Med., Columbus, OH.

B-272  Broad Spectrum O-Linked Protein Glycosylation in the Human Pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Å. Vik, F. Aas, W. M. Egge-Jacobsen, J. Haug Anonsen, M. Koomey;
Univ. of Oslo, Oslo, NORWAY.

B-273  Functional Characterization and Role in Pathogenesis of the Oligopeptide Uptake (Opp) System among Xanthomonas Species.

E. E. Oshiro1, N. P. Taschner1, C. F. Suzuki1, D. C. Pimenta2, J. C. F. Oliveira3, M. I. T. Ferro3, L. C. S. Ferreira1, R. C. C. Ferreira1;
1Univ. of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, BRAZIL, 2Inst. Butantan, Sao Paulo, BRAZIL, 3Univ. Federal de São Paulo, Sao Paulo, BRAZIL.

B-274  Inactivation of mor141 Affects Membrane Morphology and Secretion of Leukotoxin in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

C. V. Gallant, E. Chicoine, K. P. Mintz;
Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT.

B-275  Co-Cultures of Bacteroides fragilis and a Colitis-Associated Bacteroides vulgatus Strain Induce a Polarized Hemolytic Activity and Altered Protein Profile with Differential Immunoreactivity to Serum Antibodies from Crohn’s Disease.

E. R. Rocha1, C. J. Smith1, R. B. Sartor2;
1East Carolina Univ. Brody Sch. of Med., Greenville, NC, 2CGIBD, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.

B-276  Contribution of the Bacillus anthracis lrgAB Operon to Stationary Phase Survival, Murein Hydrolase Activity and Sporulation.

L. Chandramohan, J. S. Ahn, K. W. Bayles;
Univ. of Nebraska Med. Ctr., Omaha, NE.

B-277  Systematic Analysis of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Metabolism during Growth in Human Urine.

C. J. Alteri, D. J. Reiss, H. L. T. Mobley;
Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch., Ann Arbor, MI.

B-278  Glycogen Storage Plays a Role in the Survival and Pathogenesis of Vibrio cholerae.

L. Bourassa, A. Camilli;
Tufts Univ. Sch. of Med. and Howard Hughes Med. Inst., Boston, MA.

B-279  Function and Expression of the hmu Heme Transport System in Corynebacterium Species.

M. P. Schmitt, C. E. Allen, C. A. Kunkle;
FDA/CBER, Bethesda, MD.

B-280  Characterizing the Role of the Glyoxylate Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

J. Hagins, L. Suh;
Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL.

B-281  Branched-Chain Keto Acid Dehydrogenase Is Required for Optimal Bacillus anthracis Virulence.

W. A. Day, Jr.1, S. L. Rasmussen1, T. E. Blank1, S. N. Peterson2, A. M. Friedlander1;
1USAMRIID, Frederick, MD, 2Inst. for Genomic Res., Rockville, MD.

B-282  Characterization of a Putative Heme ABC Transporter in Neisseria meningitidis.

K. T. Ingrey, B. C. Lee;
Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, CANADA.

B-283  Phenotypic Changes of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains after the Deletion of Plasmid O157.

J. Lim, H. Sheng, C. J. Hovde;
Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID.

B-469  Osmotic and Acid Tolerance Responses in Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Pre-Adaptation in High NaCl Cross Protects in Low pH.

W. B. Whitaker, L. M. Naughton, E. F. Boyd;
Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE.

 

163/B. Secretion Systems of Pathogenic Microorganisms - I

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

B-284  Roles for Major Periplasmic Chaperones in the Biogenesis of Autotransporter Proteins from the SPATE Family.

F. Ruiz--Perez, J. P. Nataro;
Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD.

B-285  Characterization and Expression of a Novel Acylated Bordetella Autotransporter.

P. V. Sims, R. C. Fernandez;
Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, CANADA.

B-286  The Escherichia coli AIDA-I Autotransporter Undergoes Glycosylation Independently of Export.

M-E. Charbonneau, M. Mourez;
Univ. de Montréal, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, CANADA.

B-287  Identification and Characterization of Four Autotransporter Proteins in Yersinia pestis.

D. G. Cotter1,2, M. B. Lawrenz2, J. D. Lenz2, W. Lathem2, W. E. Goldman2, V. L. Miller2;
1Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, 2Washington Univ. Sch. of Med., St. Louis, MO.

B-288  Secretion Importance of Conserved Residues in the C Terminus of a Serine Protease Autotransporter Protein.

Y. T. Yen1,2, C. Tsang1, T. A. Cameron1, C. Stathopoulos1;
1California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA, 2Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX.

B-289  Structural Determinants of Autoproteolysis by Haemophilus influenzae Hap Autotransporter.

R. H. Kenjale, J. W. St. Geme, III;
Duke Univ., Durham, NC.

B-290  Identification of Novel Inhibitors of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Twin-Arginine- Translocase (TAT) Secretion System Using a High-Throughput Approach.

A. P. Tomaras, A. E. Pritchard, M. L. Vasil;
Univ. of Colorado, Aurora, CO.

B-291  TraG Is a Variable Inner Membrane Protein Essential for Function of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV Secretion System.

P. L. Kohler, H. L. Hamilton, J. P. Dillard;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

B-292  Determining the Surface Components of the Type IV Secretion System in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis.

K. T. Hackett, H. L. Hamilton, J. P. Dillard;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

B-293  Isolation and Characterization of Legionella pneumophila DotL Mutants.

M. C. Sutherland, V. Tseng, T-L. Nguyen, J. P. Vogel;
Washington Univ., St Louis, MO.

B-294  Functional Analysis of Invasion Plasmid Antigen B (IpaB) During Type III Secretion by Shigella flexneri.

C. M. Terry, N. L. Shelton, W. L. Picking, W. D. Picking;
Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS.

B-295  Interaction of Deoxycholate with IpaD, the Type III Secretion Apparatus Needle Tip Protein of Shigella flexneri.

P. R. Adam, C. D. LaMar, K. Stensrud, R. S. Givens, G. H. Lushington, W. L. Picking, W. D. Picking;
Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS.

B-296  Control of Effector Secretion by the P. aeruginosa Type III Secretion System.

P-C. Lee, C. Stopford, A. Rietsch;
Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH.

B-297  Oligomerization of the Type II Secretion Protein EpsE as a Means of Stimulating Its ATPase Activity.

M. Patrick1, J. L. Camberg2, M. Sandkvist1;
1Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2NIH, Bethesda, MD.

B-298  The Protein-Protein Interaction Map of the Chlamydia trachomatis Type Three Secretion System.

K. E. Spaeth, R. H. Valdivia;
Duke Univ., Durham, NC.

B-299  Small Molecule Compounds that Inhibit Translocation of Yersinia Yops.

D. E. Harmon, C. Castillo, A. J. Davis, J. Mecsas;
Tufts Univ., Boston, MA.

B-300  Characterization of the Chlamydophilia pneumoniae Type III Secretion ATPase.

C. B. Stone, D. L. Johnson, J. B. Mahony;
McMaster Univ. St. Joseph's Hlth.care, Hamilton, ON, CANADA.

B-301  Characterization of Inner Membrane YscU and C-Ring YscQ Proteins of the Type III Secretion System of Chlamydophila pneumoniae.

R. K. Toor1, J. D. Turner1, D. L. Johnson1, J. B. Mahony1,2;
1McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON, CANADA, 2St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, ON, CANADA.

B-302  A Functional Type 3 Secretion System Is Required for Flagella Assembly in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

J. Xicohtencatl-Cortes1, P. Samadder1, Z. Saldana1, J. Puente2, J. Puente2, J. A. Girón1;
1Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2Inst. de Biotecnología, Univ. Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos, MEXICO.

B-303  TAT Protein Export Pathway in Campylobacter jejuni .

N. Weida1, S. Grewal1, Q. Zhang2, J. Byeong Hwa2, D. Gangaiah1, G. Rajashekara1;
1The Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH, 2Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA.

B-304  Mutational Analysis of YopN of Yersinia pestis.

S. S. Joseph, G. V. Plano;
Univ. of Miami Miller Sch. of Med., Miami, FL.

 

164/C. Diagnostic Mycobacteriology - All Methods and Susceptibility

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

C-199  Temperature Optimization in Preparation of Slides for AFB Smear Microscopy.

S. Jones, J. A. Westerling, R. Droste, P. Elvin, A. Sloutsky;
Massachusetts Dept. of Pub. Hlth., Jamaica Plain, MA.

C-200  Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Respiratory and Non-Respiratory Clinical Specimen Using the BACTEC MGIT960 Culture and DNA Strand Displacement Amplification (SDA) Assay.

M. A. M. El-Sweify1,2, M. A. Soliman3;
1Faculty of Med., Suez Canal Univ., Egypt, Riyadh, SAUDI ARABIA, 2KFMC-FOM, Riyadh, SAUDI ARABIA, 3Al-Iman Gen. Hosp., MOH, Riyadh, SAUDI ARABIA.

C-201  Evaluation of the Use of Mitchison 7H11 Agar Plates in Conjunction with the BACTEC MGIT 960 Broth System for Recovery of Mycobacteria in a Public Health Laboratory.

J. L. Tans-Kersten, D. M. Warshauer;
Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene, Madison, WI.

C-202  Evaluation of Clarithromycin Drug Susceptibility Testing for Mycobacterium avium/intracellulare complex (MAC) using Commercially Available MAISLOW Sensititre Plates and Custom JustOne Strips.

L. Hall1, A. T. Abbenyi1, J. J. Eisberner1, B. A. Brown-Elliott2, C. J. Pratt1, K. Beierle2, M. McGlasson2, S. L. Wohlfiel1, S. M. Deml1, R. J. Wallace, Jr.2, N. L. Wengenack1;
1Mayo Clin., Rochester, MN, 2The Univ. of Texas Hlth. Ctr., Tyler, TX.

C-203  Monitoring Therapy Efficacy by Real-Time Mycobacterium tuberculosis mRNA Detection in Sputum Specimens.

N. Mdivani1, H. Li2, M. Akhalaia3, M. Gegia1, L. Goginashvili3, D. Kernodle2, G. Khechinashvili1, Y-W. Tang2;
1Georgian Fndn. Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, Tbilisi, GEORGIA, 2Vanderbilt Univ. Med. Ctr., Nashville, TN, 3Natl. Ctr. of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases, Tbilisi, GEORGIA.

C-204  The Role of Laser Capture Microdissection in PCR Detection of Mycobacteria from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues.

S. P. Buckwalter, N. L. Wengenack, B. S. Pritt;
Mayo Clin., Rochester, MN.

C-205  Comparison of culture with Auramine Rhodamine Stain, the Amplified Direct Test and a M. tuberculosis Real-Time PCR Assay for Respiratory Specimens.

S. P. Buckwalter, L. Buschur, S. Clark, C. Ruth, G. Short, J. VanDorp, S. Wohlfiel, N. L. Wengenack;
Mayo Clin., Rochester, MN.

C-206  Clinical Evaluation of Commercial Strand Displacement Amplification (SDA) System in Detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) in Smear-Negative Respiratory and Non-Respiratory Specimens.

L-H. Sng, P. Y. F. Cheah, M. Y. Choy, M. D. G. Quieng, A. J. V. Ramirez, S. Wang;
Singapore Gen. Hosp., Singapore, SINGAPORE.

C-207  Comparison of in-House PCR with Conventional Techniques, and Cobas Amplicor M. tuberculosis™ kit for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

M. Kim, H. Lee, H. Yang, J. Suh;
Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

C-208  Inhibition Testing among Participants in CDC’s Model Performance Evaluation Program for Nucleic Acid Amplification for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, 2004-2007.

L. O. Williams1, D. M. Warshauer2, P. Robinson1, J. Nichols2, J. Tans-Kersten2;
1CDC, Atlanta, GA, 2Wisconsin State Lab. of Hygiene, Madison, WI.

C-209  Novel Diagnostic Algorithm for Identification of Mycobacterium spp. Using tuf Gene Amplification and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism.

J-H. Shin, E-J. Cho, J-Y. Lee, J-Y. Yu, Y-H. Kang;
Natl. Inst. of Hlth., Ctr. for Disease Control and Prevention, Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

C-210  Development and Implementation of a Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex DNA from Clinical Samples in New York State.

T. A. Halse, P. Cunningham, W. J. Wolfgang, N. Dumas, K. Musser;
New York State Dept. of Hlth., Albany, NY.

C-211  Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium spp. Resistance to Antimicrobial Agents by Real-Time Reverse Transcription PCR.

J-M. Balada-Llasat1, C. K. Wallis2, B. A. Brown-Elliott3, R. J. Wallace, Jr3, F. C. Fang1,2;
1Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2Harborview Med. Ctr., Seattle, WA, 3Univ. of Texas Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Tyler, TX.

 

165/C. Diagnostic Mycology and Parasitology

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

C-212  Multi-center Evaluation of BBL ™ CHROMagar™ Candida Medium for the Detection and Identification of Yeast from Vaginal Specimens.

J. L. Cromien1, R. L. Kaplan2, D. A. Schwab3, R. F. Cammarata4, P. L. Cerwinka5, C. L. Wong6, L. M. Zuchowski7, D. S. Mincarelli8;
1Quest Diagnostics, St. Louis, MO, 2Quest Diagnostics, Atlanta, GA, 3Quest Diagnostics, San Juan Capistrano, CA, 4Quest Diagnostics, Syosset, NY, 5Quest Diagnostics, Collegeville, PA, 6Quest Diagnostics, Wallingford, CT, 7Quest Diagnostics, Lenexa, KS, 8Quest Diagnostics, Horsham, PA.

C-213  The Impact of Chromagar on the Time to Identification of Yeast Positive Blood Cultures.

M. Sholtis, M. Wnek, S. Schindler, D. Warner, G. S. Hall;
Cleveland Clin., Cleveland, OH.

C-214  Comparison of HardyCHROMTM Candida with the Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card Identification System for the Identification of Common Yeast Pathogens.

W. Phillips1, M. Sarina2, T. Zumwalt2, R. Clasen1, J. Hardy1;
1Hardy Diagnostics, Santa Maria, CA, 2Central Coast Pathology Consultants, San Luis Obispo, CA.

C-215  A Multi-Site Evaluation of Caspofungin (CAS) on Sensititre® YeastOne® Susceptibility System Compared with the CLSI M27 Reference Broth Micro Dilution (BMD) Plate for Antifungal Susceptibility Testing.

N. M. Holliday1, C. C. Knapp1, S. B. Killian1, C. M. Bastulli1, M. A. Ghannoum2, M. A. Pfaller3, S. A. Messer3, D. Diekema3, R. Ramani4, V. Chaturvedi4;
1TREK Diagnostic Systems, Cleveland, OH, 2Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH, 3Univ. of Iowa Coll. of Med., Iowa City, IA, 4New York State Dept. of Hlth., Albany, NY.

C-216  Evaluation of New Candida Mannan Antigen Detection Kit"Cica Fungi Test" Using Candidamia Specimens.

K. Kinoshita1, I. Yamaguchi1, R. Kubo2, A. Shinzaki3;
1Toyohashi Municipal Hosp., Aichi, JAPAN, 2Kanto Chemical Co.,Inc., Tokyo, JAPAN, 3Unitika Ltd., Kyoto, JAPAN.

C-217  The Use of High-Resolution Melt on the Rotor-GeneTM 6000 to Characterize Codon 54 of the cyp51A Gene of Aspergillus fumigatus.

M. J. Tuohy1, V. Reja2, S. Park3, D. S. Perlin3, M. Wnek1, B. Yen-Lieberman1;
1Cleveland Clin., Cleveland, OH, 2Corbett Research, Sydney, AUSTRALIA, 3UMDNJ-New Jersey Med. Sch., Newark, NJ.

C-218  DNA Profiling For Pathogenic Candida Species Identification.

W. Wei1, H-M. Pang1, G. W. Procop2;
1Advanced Analytical Technologies, Inc., Ames, IA, 2Cleveland Clin., Cleveland, OH.

C-219  Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in the Diagnosis of Onychomycosis: Single Institute Study of 3097 Specimens.

C. E. Litz, R. Z. Cavagnolo;
ProPath, Inc., Dallas, TX.

C-220  Validation of a Serum Histoplasma Antigen Assay.

J. L. Cloud1, S. K. Bauman2, J. M. Pelfrey2, K. Ludwig1, E. R. Ashwood1,3;
1ARUP Inst. for Clin. and Experimental Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT, 2Immuno-Mycologics, Inc., Norman, OK, 3Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

C-221  Real-Time PCR Detection of Pneumocystis jiroveci in the Immunocompetent Host Population.

T. Grys, M. Binnicker, D. Maldonado, D. Midthun, A. Limper, N. Wengenack, J. Wilson;
Mayo Clin., Rochester, MN.

C-222  Comparison of the Aspergillus DiversiLab rep-PCR Assay to a Sequenced-Based Method Using Two Databases for the Identification of Aspergillus species.

K. Eskey1, L. Hall2, T. Ross1, J. Gorthy1, W. G. Merz1;
1Johns Hopkins Med. Inst., Baltimore, MD, 2Mayo Clin., Rochester, MN.

C-223  Development of a Rapid Screening Assay for the Detection of Zoonotic Cryptosporidium Species in Human Faeces.

A. Alagappan1, N. A. Tujula1, M. L. Power1, P. L. Bergquist1,2, B. C. Ferrari1;
1Macquarie Univ., Sydney, AUSTRALIA, 2Univ. of Auckland Med. Sch., Auckland, NEW ZEALAND.

C-224  Evaluation of the PlexusTM Parasite Multi-Analyte Diagnostics Test Kit for Detection of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum Antigens in Formalin Fixed Stool Specimens.

M. J. Marcon, D. Salamon, K. Mack, K. Everhart, L. Sherman, A. Leber;
Nationwide Children's Hosp., Columbus, OH.

C-225  PCR-Bead-Based Detection of Protozoan Enteropathogens from Stool.

L. Krna, S. Stroup, E. R. Houpt;
Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

C-226  Rapid, Specific and Easy Diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi by PCR-Oligochromatography Using the T. cruzi OligoC-TesT.

X. Coronado1, S. Deborggraeve1, P. Y. M. G. Mertens2, T. H. Laurent2, T. Leclipteux2, P. Büscher1;
1Inst. of Tropical Med., Antwerp, BELGIUM, 2CorisBioconcept, Gembloux, BELGIUM.

C-227  Detection of Microsporidia Related to Encephalitozoon intestinalis in the Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line A549.

P. O. Gaboton, M. Dao;
Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL.

C-228  Evaluation of the OSOM® Trichomonas Rapid Test vs. Wet Prep Exam for Diagnosis of T. vaginalis Vaginitis in a Regional Clinical Microbiology Laboratory.

L. Campbell1, S. Elsayed2, T. Lloyd1, D. L. Church1,2;
1Calgary Lab. Services (CLS), Calgary, AB, CANADA, 2Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, AB, CANADA.

C-229  Value of Demographic Data, Clinical Indicators, and Non-Specific Laboratory Parameters in Diagnosis of Imported Malaria.

A. M. A. R. El-Moamly, M. A. Al-Sweify;
Suez Canal Univ., Ismailia, EGYPT.

C-230  Resistance of Acanthamoeba Cysts to Disinfection in Multiple Contact Lens Solutions.

S. P. Johnston, G. S. Visvesvara, R. Sriram, Y. Qvarnstrom, S. Roy;
CDC, Atlanta, GA.

C-231  North American Paragonimiasis: A Review of Five Patients Infected by P. kellicotti.

G. W. Procop;
Cleveland Clin., Cleveland, OH.

 

166/D. Immune Responses to Pathogenic Bacteria

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

D-091  Characterizing a Role for Caenorhabditis elegans CUB-Like Domain-Containing Proteins in Immunity toward Yersinia pestis.

D. D. Bolz, J. L. Tenor, K. L. Styer, A. Aballay;
Duke Univ., Durham, NC.

D-092  Antibody Respose Patterns to Bordetella pertussis Antigens in Vaccinated (primed) and Unvaccinated (unprimed) Young Children with Pertussis.

J. D. Cherry1, U. Heininger2;
1David Geffen Sch. of Med., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA, 2Univ. Children's Hosp., Basel, SWITZERLAND.

D-093  Serologic Correlates of Immunity to Bordetella pertussis Cough Illness.

H. Hallander1, J. D. Cherry2, L. Gustafsson1, J. Storsaeter3, U. Heininger4;
1Swedish Inst. for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, SWEDEN, 2David Geffen Sch. of Med., Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA, 3GlaxoSmithKline, Solna, SWEDEN, 4Univ. Children's Hosp., Basel, SWITZERLAND.

D-094  Soluble Fibrin Inhibits Monocyte Adherence and Phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus.

J. P. Biggerstaff, B. L. Weidow, J. Venditti;
Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN.

D-095  The Host Humoral Response against Helicobacter pylori Lipopolysaccharide is Influenced by cagA Status.

E. L. Sanabria-Valentín, G. I. Perez-Perez, M. J. Blaser;
New York Univ. Sch. of Med., New York, NY.

D-096  Response of Immune Cells towards Helicobacter pylori Strains of the Kalixanda Study.

S. Andres1,2, H-M. Schmidt3, L. Plant1,2, L. Engstrand1,2;
1Swedish Inst. for Infectious Disease Control, Solna, SWEDEN, 2Karolinska Inst., Stockholm, SWEDEN, 3Sch. of Med. Sci., Univ. of South Wales, Sydney, AUSTRALIA.

D-097  IL-8 Serum Levels in Patients with Helicobacter pylori Infection and Relation between Serological Markers.

N. Kasifoglu, Y. Akgun, T. Saricam, A. Kiremitci, T. Us;
Eskiehir Osmangazi Univ., Eskisehir, TURKEY.

D-098  The Toll-Like Receptor Signaling Pathway Mediates Release of Inflammatory Mediators in Human Monocytes Stimulated with Borrelia burgdorferi Spirochetes.

V. A. Dennis1, S. Dixit1, S. O. Brein2, X. Alvarez1, B. Pahar1, M. Philipp1;
1Tulane Natl. Primate Res. Ctr., Covington, LA, 2Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA.

D-099  Infected Mice Produce Antibodies against the Variable Tick Protein of Borrelia hermsii, a Relapsing Fever Agent.

R. A. Marcsisin, Q. Dai, A. G. Barbour;
Univ. of California, Irvine, CA.

 

167/D. Streptococci, Enterococci and Staphylococci

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

D-100  The Expression of Streptococcus mutans vicRKX Operon Is Influenced by the LiaFSR Three-Component Regulatory System, The Alternative Sigma Factor, ComX, and the Competence-Signal Peptide.

Y. D. N. Tremblay, Y-H. Li, S. A. Halperin, S. F. Lee;
Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, NS, CANADA.

D-101  Identification of a Gene Cluster Regulating Acid Tolerance and a (p)ppGpp Synthase in Streptococcus mutans.

K. C. Seaton, S-J. Ahn, R. A. Burne;
Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

D-102  Identification and Analysis of Streptococcus sanguinis Sortases in Experimental Infective Endocarditis.

L. S. Turner, T. Kanamoto, T. Unoki, C. L. Munro, T. Kitten;
Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA.

D-103  Involvement of thrB in Antoinducer-2 Production in Streptococcus sanguinis.

X. Ge, P. Xu;
Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA.

D-104  A Cell Associated Pneumococcal Gycosidase Modifies O-linked Glycoconjugates.

D. H. Limoli1, C. Marion1, J. L. Abraham1, A. M. Burnaugh1,2, S. J. King1,2;
1The Res. Inst. at Nationwide Children's Hosp., Columbus, OH, 2The Ohio State Univ. Coll. of Med. and Pub. Hlth., Columbus, OH.

D-105  Modeling pH Effect upon Growth Parameters of Serotypes III and V Group B Streptococci with Richards Model.

Y-R. Ho1, C-M. Li2, C-H. Yu1, Y-C. Tseng1, H-P. Su3, J-J. Wu1;
1Natl. Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan, TAIWAN, 2Natl. Cheng Kung Univ.; Chi Mei Med. Ctr., Tainan, TAIWAN, 3Ctr. for Disease Control, Taipei, TAIWAN.

D-106  Emerging Penicillin Resistance in Group B Streptococcus Secondary to PBP2x Mutations.

S. Dahesh1, M. E. Hensler1, N. M. Van Sorge1, R. E. Gertz, Jr.2, S. Schrag2, V. Nizet1, B. W. Beall2;
1Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA, 2CDC, Atlanta, GA.

D-107  Effect of Serotype and O-Acetylation on Group B Streptococcus Sialic Acid-Dependent Phenotypes.

S. Weiman, S. Uchiyama, A. F. Carlin, A. Varki, V. Nizet, A. L. Lewis;
Univ. of California, San Diego, CA.

D-108  Variation in the Group B Streptococcus CsrRS Regulon and Effects on Pathogenicity.

S-M. Jiang1,2, N. Ishmael3, J. D. Hotopp3, M. Puliti4, L. Tissi4, N. Kumar3, M. J. Cieslewicz1,2, H. Tettelin3, M. R. Wessels1,2;
1Children's Hosp., Boston, MA, 2Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA, 3The J. Craig Venter Inst., Rockville, MD, 4Univ. of Perugia, Perugia, ITALY.

D-109  Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus intermedius GIFU 8327 (= NCDO 2227), a Pathogen of Human Purulent Infections.

K. Kikuchi, T. Baba, T. Sasaki, K. Kishii, F. Takeuchi, S. Watanabe, M. Sekine, M. Matsuo, L. Cui, T. Ito, K. Hiramatsu;
Juntendo Univ., Tokyo, JAPAN.

D-110  Transcriptomic Profile of E. faecalis to a Therapeutic Dose of Vancomycin.

T. Ribeiro1, M. F. Silva Lopes1, M. Gilmore2;
1IBET/ITQB, Oeiras, PORTUGAL, 2The Schepens Eye Res. Inst., Boston, MA.

D-111  Cell Death of Macrophages Induced by Enterococci.

S. Gröbner, E. Fritz, I. B. Autenrieth;
Univ. Hosp., Tübingen, GERMANY.

D-112  Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Nitric Oxide (NO)-Related Genes and their Potential Role in the Cid/Lrg Cell Death Regulon.

K. C. Rice, J. L. Endres, K. W. Bayles;
Univ. of Nebraska Med. Ctr., Omaha, NE.

D-113  Mutations Conferring Staphylococcus aureus Sensitivity to Cathelicidin Antimicrobial Peptides Mapping to the Bla Operon.

M. A. Pence, R. L. Gallo, V. Nizet, S. A. Kristian;
Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA.

D-114  The Role of the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) in Virulence of Staphylococcus aureus in a Mouse Skin Abscess Infection Model.

P. Yoong, G. B. Pier;
Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA.

D-115  Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) Plays a Role in Pathogenesis in a Murine Skin Infection Model.

C. Tseng1, P. Kyme1, M. A. Rocha2, D. O. Beenhouwer2,3, G. Liu1;
1Cedars-Sinai Med. Ctr., Los Angeles, CA, 2VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, 3David Geffen Sch. of Med. at Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA.

D-116  Molecular Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Isolates from Turkey.

A. Basustaoglu1, A. Kilic1, G. Mert1, Z. Senses1, H. Aydogan1, P. Appelbaum2;
1Gulhane Military Med. Academy, Ankara, TURKEY, 2Hershey Med. Ctr., Hershey, PA.

D-117  Multirresistance and Adhesion Properties among Staphylococcus epidermidis Isolated from Blood Cultures in a Public Hospital, Brazil.

M. F. L. Barros1, J. C. O. Tortora1, L. A. Teixeira1, J. A. A. Pereira2, C. Matheus-Guimarães1, D. P. Alves1, R. S. Sant'Anna1, A. M. F. Cerqueira1;
1Univ. Federal Fluminense, Niterói, BRAZIL, 2Univ. do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL.

D-118  A Staphylococcal Eukaryotic-Like Serine/Threonine Kinase and Phosphatase are Implicated in Antimicrobial Resistance and Adhesion.

A. M. Beltramini, V. Pancholi;
The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH.

D-119  Rapid PNA FISH Protocol Modification for Detection of Staphylococci.

M. Morgan, A. Deirboghossian, E. Youssef;
Cedars Sinai Med. Ctr., Los Angeles, CA.

 

168/F. Fungal Pathogenesis and Host Response

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

F-022  Ability of Vaginal Dendritic Cells to Induce Mucosal Immunity against Candida albicans in a Rat Model of Vaginitis.

F. De Bernardis1, S. Arancia1, R. Lucciarini2, M. Boccanera1, C. Amantini2, S. Graziani1, A. Cassone1, G. Santoni2;
1Istituto Superiore di Sanita', Rome, ITALY, 2Univ. of Camerino, Camerino, ITALY.

F-023  The Effects of Candida albicans Colonization on the Murine Microbiota.

K. Mason, N. R. Falkowski, V. B. Young, J. Y. Kao, G. B. Huffnagle;
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

F-024  A Novel Gene Is Correlated with Virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans .

E. E. McClelland, A. Casadevall;
Albert Einstein Coll. of Med., Bronx, NY.

F-025  Deletion of the Aspergillus fumigatus Protein Kinase A (PKA) Regulatory Subunit, pkaR, Decreases Virulence in a Murine Model of Chronic Granulomatous Disorder.

J. R. Fortwendel, R. S. Gibbons, H. L. Allen, G. S. Deepe, S. L. Newman, D. S. Askew, J. C. Rhodes;
Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH.

F-026  Cryptococcus neoformans from Mice Treated with Radioactive Antibodies to the Polysaccharide Capsule Retains Sensitivity to Radioactivity.

R. A. Bryan, X. Huang, Z. Jiang, A. Casadevall, E. Dadachova;
Albert Einstein Coll. of Med., Bronx, NY.

F-027  Role of Candida albicans SSK1 Response Regulator in Interaction with Endothelial Cells.

X. Li, V. Menon, R. Calderone, N. Cauhan;
Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC.

F-028  Aggregates of Cells Exfoliated from Candida albicans Biofilms Bind to Human Buccal Epithelial Cells by a Mechanism Involving Mannan.

E. Hendrix, S. Donahue, S. Durham, R. E. Garner;
Mercer Univ. Sch. of Med., Macon, GA.

F-029  Multiparametric Flow Cytometry as a Method to Assess the Potential of Coccidioidal Antigens as Human Vaccines.

L. A. Nesbit1, S. M. Johnson2, D. Pappagianis2, N. M. Ampel1;
1Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2Univ. of California, Davis, CA.

F-030  Increased IL-4 Production By Macrophages in CCR2-/- Mice Results in the Inability to Resolve Histoplasma capsulatum Infection.

W. A. Szymczak, G. S. Deepe, Jr.;
Univ. of Cincinnati Coll. of Med., Cincinnati, OH.

F-031  Isolation and Evaluation of a Glycoprotein from the Coccidioidal Vaccine T27K.

S. M. Johnson1, N. M. Ampel2, L. A. Nesbit2, C. N. Miller1, D. Pappagianis1;
1Univ. of California, Davis, CA, 2Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

F-032  The Cryptococcus neoformans Vacuole Has Characteristics of an Autophagosome.

A. M. Nicola, P. A. Andrade, D. Dao, A. Casadevall;
Albert Einstein Coll. of Med., Bronx, NY.

F-033  A Possible Association between the Loss of Toll-Like Receptor 5 and Fungemia.

G. W. Procop, M. J. Tuohy, G. Murugesan;
Cleveland Clin., Cleveland, OH.

F-034  Repeated Inhalation of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia Induces an Allergic Airway Disease that Leads to Pronounced Arterial Remodeling in the Lung.

A. B. Shreiner, E. S. White, C. Hogaboam, R. McDonald, B. Fields, P. Christensen, G. B. Huffnagle;
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

F-035  Intracellular Localization of Cryptococcus neoformans following Dendritic Cell Phagocytosis.

K. L. Wozniak1, S. M. Levitz2;
1Univ. of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA, 2Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch., Worcester, MA.

F-036  Cytokine Release Stimulated by Particulate 1,3-D-Glucans in the Presence and Absence of Ligands for Toll-Like Receptors.

H. Huang, G. R. Ostroff, S. M. Levitz;
Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch., Worcester, MA.

F-037  Toll-Like Receptor 9-Dependent Immune Activation by Unmethylated CpG Motifs in Aspergillus fumigatus DNA.

Z. G. Ramirez-Ortiz1, C. A. Specht1, J. P. Wang1, C. Lee1, D. C. Bartholomeu2, R. T. Gazzinelli1,2, S. M. Levitz1;
1Univ. of Massachusetts Med. Sch., Worcester, MA, 2UFMG, Bello Horizonte, MG, BRAZIL.

F-038  Inheritance of Resistance versus Susceptibility Patterns to Cryptococcus neoformans Infection in a Mouse Model.

G-H. Chen1, D. A. McNamara1, Y. Hernandez1, K. C. Tompkins2, G. B. Huffnagle1, G. B. Toews1,2, M. A. Olszewski2,1;
1Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2VA Med. Ctr., Ann Arbor, MI.

F-039  CD11c (+) Cells Are Critical for Early Protection against Pulmonary Infection with Cryptococcus neoformans.

J. J. Osterholzer1,2, J. Milam1, N. Falcowski1, G-H. Chen1, R. McDonald1, G. B. Toews1,2, G. B. Huffnagle1, M. A. Olszewski1,2;
1Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 2VA Med. Ctr., Ann Arbor, MI.

 

169/H. Transcription Control

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

H-069  Evidence for Involvement of an ECF Sigma Factor in Cyanobacterial Cellular Differentiation.

K. LeGrand, M. L. Summers;
California State Univ., Northridge, CA.

H-070  Computational Prediction of PilR-Regulated Sequence Elements in the Genome of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

J. F. Barbe1, T. Ueki2, K. Juarez-Lopez3, R. M. Adkins1, D. R. Lovley2, J. Krushkal1;
1Univ. of Tennessee Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Memphis, TN, 2Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 3Inst. de Biotecnología/UNAM, Cuernavaca, MEXICO.

H-071  RpoN Targets in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

J. Krushkal1, C. Leang2, M. Puljic1, R. M. Adkins1, D. R. Lovley2;
1Univ. of Tennessee Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Memphis, TN, 2Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

H-072  Regulation of Expression of Genes Encoding General Components of the Phosphoenolpyruvate: Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System (PTS) in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

Y. Tanaka, H. Teramoto, M. Inui, H. Yukawa;
RITE, Kyoto, JAPAN.

H-073  A Family of Transcriptional Antitermination Factors Is Necessary for Synthesis of the Multiple Capsular Polysaccharides of Bacteroides fragilis.

M. Chatzidaki-Livanis, M. J. Coyne, L. E. Comstock;
Channing Lab., Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA.

H-074  Transcriptioanal Analysis of the S. epidermis Marcomolecular Synthesis Operon.

K. A. Bryant, S. H. Hinrichs, P. D. Fey;
Univ. of Nebraska Med. Ctr., Omaha, NE.

H-075  Mutations in the G-boxes in the Promoter Region of the Escherichia coli gnd Gene Lower gnd Gene Expression.

R. N. Tolbert, E. M. Schlimm, T. T. Olungwe, A. J. Pease;
Villa Julie Coll., Stevenson, MD.

H-076  Global Mapping of Transcription Start Sites of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

K. Juarez1, A. Mendoza1, L. Olvera1, L. Vega-Alvarado2, B. Taboada2, V. Jiménez3, M. Olvera1, E. Morett1, D. R. Lovley4;
1Inst. de Biotecnologia, Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Morelos, MEXICO, 2Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, MEXICO, 3Centro de Ciencias Genomica, Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cuernavaca, Morelos, MEXICO, 4University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

H-077  HetR Transcription Control in the Developmental Regulation of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

R. Rajagopalan, S. M. Callahan;
Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI.

H-078  A Novel Chlamydial Protein Binds to the b Subunit of RNA Polymerase.

X. Rao1, Z. Hua1, P. Deighan2, Y. Liang1, A. Hochschild2, L. Shen1;
1Boston Univ. Sch. of Med., Boston, MA, 2Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA.

H-079  Analysis of DNA-Protein Interaction Mediated by Carboxyl-Terminal Residues in Chlamydial Sigma 28.

Z. Hua, X. Rao, Y. Liang, L. Shen;
Boston Univ. Med. Sch., Boston, MA.

H-080  Promoter Analysis of Aminopeptidase Gene in Nostoc punctiforme.

R. J. Ireland, III, M. L. Summers;
California State Univ., Northridge, CA.

H-081  Genetic Studies on the Fimbrial Subunit Promoters of Bordetella pertussis.

Q. Chen1, P. Boucher1, K. Baxter2, D. Hinton2, S. Stibitz1;
1CBER/FDA, Bethesda, MD, 2NIDDK/NIH, Bethesda, MD.

H-082  The Role of HP1042 in Helicobacter pylori Motility.

T. G. Smith, T. R. Hoover;
The Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

H-083  Effect of covR and vicK Gene Inactivation in the Expression of Virulence Genes in Strains of Streptococcus mutans.

R. N. Stipp1, R. B. Gonçalves1, J. F. Höfling1, D. J. Smith2, R. O. Mattos-Graner1;
1Piracicaba Dent. Sch. – FOP/UNICAMP, Piracicaba, SP, BRAZIL, 2The Forsyth Inst., Boston, MA.

H-084  s70 Region 1.1 of E. coli RNA Polymerase Modulates Transcription Initiation in Response to the AT-Richness of the Promoter Spacer.

I. G. Hook-Barnard, D. M. Hinton;
NIH, Bethesda, MD.

H-085  Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses of Different Escherichia coli Strains to Recombinant Protein Overproduction.

M. Kim, S. Park, D-B. Oh, H. Kang, O. Kwon;
Korea Res. Inst. of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

H-086  Genome Wide Analysis of RNA Polymerase and s70 Binding in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

Y. Qiu1, K. Zengler1, B-K. Cho1, L. Kagan1, J. Elkins1, D. R. Lovley2, B. Ø. Palsson1;
1Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA, 2Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

H-087  The Binding Sequences of the LexA1 and LexA2 Proteins of Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovar citri.

M-K. Yang1, C-H. Hsu2, V-L. Sung1;
1Fu Jen Univ., Hsin Chuang, TAIWAN, 2Fu Jen Univ., Graduate Inst. of Applied Sci. and Engineering, Hsin Chuang, TAIWAN.

H-088  Role of C1-Hydroxyl Configuration of D-Galactose in Modulation of Gal Repressor Activity.

S. Lee, D. E. A. Lewis, S. Adhya;
NCI/NIH, Bethesda, MD.

H-089  Regulation of the Convergent Pint and P2 Promoters of the Tn21 Class I Integron.

C. A. Cagle, A. O. Summers;
Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

H-090  Global Effects of the Bacillus subtilis Fur-Regulated Small RNA, FsrA.

G. T. Smaldone, J. D. Helmann;
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

H-091  The Regulons of Two RpoH Sigma Factors in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

A. N. Bittner1, M. J. Barnett2, C. J. Toman2, S. R. Long2, V. Oke1;
1Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 2Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA.

H-092  Fusobacterium mortiferum MalR, a Putative Transcriptional Regulator, Is a DNA-Binding Protein.

P. K. Boyd, C. L. Bouma;
West Texas A&M Univ., Canyon, TX.

H-093  Fur Family Transcriptional Regulators in Bacillus subtilis: The Role of Three Conserved Metal Binding Motifs in Sensing Metals.

S. E. Gabriel, J-W. Lee, A. R. Abberbock, J. D. Helmann;
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

 

170/I. Symbiosis

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

I-035 Genome-wide Analyses of Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm1021 Gene Expression Responsive to the ExoS/ChvI Two-Component Regulatory System.

C. Wang, J. Kemp, C. Mao, X. Sheng, R. C. Equi, I. D. Fonseca, B. W. S. Sobral;
Virginia Bioinformatics Inst., Blacksburg, VA.

I-036 Novel Genes Required for Aeromonas veronii Biofilm Formation.

C. R. Zack, J. Graf;
Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

I-037 Aconitase Mediates Repression of Bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri.

A. N. Septer, J. L. Bose, N. L. Lyell, E. V. Stabb;
Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

I-038 Symbiotic Colonization of the Medicinal Leech by Aeromonas veronii Requires an EAL-Domain-Containing Response Regulator.

L. A. Bomar, J. Graf;
Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

I-039 Bright Mutants of Vibrio fischeri ES114 Reveal Complex Regulation of the Light-Generating lux Operon.

N. L. Lyell1, A. K. Dunn2, J. L. Bose1, S. L. Vescovi1, E. V. Stabb1;
1Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK.

I-040 Symbiont Transmission during Medicinal Leech, Hirudo verbana, Embryonic Development.

R. V. Rio1, M. Maltz2, A. Reiss2, J. Graf2;
1West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV, 2Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

I-041 Prevalence of the Type III Secretion System and Effectors in the Aeromonas veronii Group.

A. C. Silver, J. Graf;
Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

I-042 Flagellar Regulation in the Light-Organ Symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

C. A. Brennan, M. J. Mandel, E. G. Ruby;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

I-043 Rhizobium etli Harpin-Like HrpW Possesses Pectate Lyase Activity.

M. Fauvart, B. Dombrecht, K. Braeken, D. Bachaspatimayum, M. Vercruysse, J. Vanderleyden, J. Michiels;
Katholieke Univ. Leuven, Heverlee, BELGIUM.

I-044 Function of Vitamin B12 in the Intracellular Plant Symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti.

M. E. Taga, G. C. Walker;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

I-045 454 Pyrosequencing to Assess the Microbial Diversity in Hessian Fly Midgut.

R. Bansal1, S. H. Hulbert2, X. Liu1, J. Reese1, J. J. Stuart3, M-S. Chen4;
1Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS, 2Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA, 3Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN, 4USDA/ARS, Manhattan, KS.

I-046 The Effect of Bioluminescence on Growth in E. coli Cells Carrying the Lux Operon from Various Vibrio Species.

M. Janghorban, E. A. O'Grady, C. F. Wimpee;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.

 

171/I. Microbial Interactions

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

I-047 A Comparison of the Transcriptional Responses of Escherichia coli as a Result of its Interaction with Other Bacteria in Planktonic Co-Cultures.

S. Ratnasingam, H. Miao, C. S. Pu, S. H. Chan, N. Yang, C. C. Sze;
Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore, SINGAPORE.

I-048 Antagonisms of Streptomyces hygroscopicus Isolated from Rhizosphere Soils to Phytopathogenic Fungi.

B. Prapagdee1, S. Mongkolsuk2,3;
1Mahidol Univ., Nakhonpathom, THAILAND, 2Mahidol Univ., Bangkok, THAILAND, 3Chulabhorn Res. Inst., Bangkok, THAILAND.

I-049 Is Quorum Sensing Involved in the Pathogenesis of Columnaris Disease?

N. H. Parker, L. F. Caslake;
Lafayette Coll., Easton, PA.

I-050 Effect of luxS Gene Deletion in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium .

P. R. R. Jesudhasan1, M. C. Cepeda1, M. E. Hume2, S. D. Pillai1;
1Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX, 2USDA, College Station, TX.

I-051 A Fluorescence-Based Approach to Population and Single Cell Analysis of the pCF10 Conjugative Transfer System of Enterococcus faecalis.

L. C. Case, A. Chatterjee, W-S. Hu, H. Haemig, G. M. Dunny;
Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

I-052 Isolating Genes Involved in Predator-Prey Interactions Using Host Independent Derivatives of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus 109J.

A. A. Medina1, R. M. Shanks2, D. E. Kadouri1;
1Univ. of Med. and Dent. of New Jersey, Newark, NJ, 2Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

I-053 Preliminary Characterization of Multiple Cya-Like Genes of the Predatory Bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

J. L. Waters, M. O. Martin;
Univ. of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA.

I-054 Carnobacterium pisciola Can Act as a Donor in the Conjugative Transfer of Kanamycin and Gentamycin Resistance to Aeromonas salmonicida Strains and Escherichia coli.

K. A. Johnson1, E. Oster1, G. R. Danner2, F. A. Fekete3;
1Bradley Univ., Peoria, IL, 2Maine Dept. of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, Augusta, ME, 3Colby Coll., Waterville, ME.

I-055 Plasmid-Mediated Transferable Mercury and Multiple Antibiotic Resistance in the Fish Pahtogen Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida.

K. A. Johnson1, D. McIntosh2, E. M. Parry3, Z. B. Zalinger3, S. E. Clark3, B. Thomas3, I. Gilg3, F. A. Fekete3;
1Bradley Univ., Peoria, IL, 2Univ. of Limerick, Limerick, IRELAND, 3Colby Coll., Waterville, ME.

 

172/K. Genetic & Biochemical Regulation of Metabolic Pathways

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

K-082  A Universal Method for the Identification of Bacteria Based on General PCR Primers.

S. A. Barghouthi;
Al-Quds Univ., Jerusalem, West Bank, PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, OCCUPIED.

K-083  Anaerobic Growth of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in Liquid Medium.

M. A. Graver, J. J. Wade;
King's Coll. Hosp., London, UNITED KINGDOM.

K-084  MnoR is a Positive Transcriptional Regulator of mno Gene in Mycobacterium sp. strain JC1 DSM 3803.

H. Park1, Y. Ro2, S. Kim1, J. Lee1, Y. Kim1;
1Yonsei Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Konkuk Coll. of Med., Chungju, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

K-085  Preferential Glycosylation of 7-Hydroxyl Group of Puerarin by Microbacterium oxydans CGMCC 1788.

S. Yuan1, J-R. Jiang1, J-F. Ding1, S-C. Zhu1, H-D. Xu1, W-P. Xu1, H. Ye1, Y-J. Dai1, X-D. Cong2;
1Nanjing Normal Univ., Nanjing, CHINA, 2Jiangsu Lianchuang Meditech Co.,Ltd, Nanjing, CHINA.

K-086  Transcriptional Repression of Biphenyl Degradation Genes by Biphenyl Metabolites in PCB Degrader, Rhodococcus jostii RHA1.

K. Miyauchi1, T. Ito1, K. Sato1, M. Fukuda2;
1Tohoku Gakuin Univ., Miyagi, JAPAN, 2Nagaoka Univ. Tech., Niigata, JAPAN.

K-087  Polyamines Stimulate Polyphosphate Accumulation in Escherichia coli.

K. Motomura, N. Takiguchi, J. Kato, R. Hirota, A. Kuroda;
Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima, JAPAN.

K-088  Dual induction of zwf-1 Encoding Glucose-6-Phospahte Dehydrogenase by Intermediate of Entner-Douderoff Pathway and Oxidative Stress in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

J. Kim, W. Park;
Korea Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

K-089  Reduction of Nitrate Occurs in the Absence of NapB in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

H. Gao1,2, Z. K. Yang3, S. Barua1, S. Reed4, M. F. Romine4, J. K. Fredrickson4, J. M. Tiedje2, J. Zhou1;
1Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 2Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI, 3Oak Ridge Natl. Lab., Oak Ridge, TN, 4Pacific Northwest Natl. Lab., Richland, WA.

K-090  Phosphorylation of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis b-Ketoacyl-ACP Synthase III (FabH) by Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases.

R. Veyron-Churlet1, V. Molle2, L. Kremer1;
1CNRS-Univ. de Montpellier II, Montpellier, FRANCE, 2CNRS-Univ. de Lyon I (IBCP), Lyon, FRANCE.

K-091  Transcriptional and Functional Characterization of a Gene Encoding a Predicted Azoreductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

I. Mugerfeld1, B. Law1, X-F. Wan2, S. Brown3, D. K. Thompson1;
1Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN, 2CDC, Atlanta, GA, 3Oak Ridge Natl. Lab., Oak Ridge, TN.

K-092  Characterization of the Putative Anti-Sigma Factor Antagonist BldG in Streptomyces coelicolor.

A. Parashar, B. K. Leskiw;
Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CANADA.

K-093  The Legacy of HfrH: Mutations in the Two-Component System CreBC Modify the Phenotype of an Escherichia coli arcA Mutant.

P. I. Nikel1,2, A. de Almeida1, M. J. Pettinari1, B. S. Mendez1;
1Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Univ. de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires, ARGENTINA, 2Instituto de Investigaciones Biotecnologicas, Univ. Nacional de San Martin, Buenos Aires, ARGENTINA.

K-094  A Unique Response Regulator of a Two-Component System Involved in a Variety of Cellular Processes in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

T. Ueki, A. Murchie, D. R. Lovley;
Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

K-095  Analysis of Phosphoproteins from Dissimilatory Metal Reducers.

C. Giometti, J. Krieger, J. Smotrys, B. Lindberg, G. Babnigg;
Argonne Natl. Lab., Argonne, IL.

K-096  Light-Dependent Regulation of Cellular Morphology in the Cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon .

J. R. Bordowitz, M. A. TerAvest, B. L. Montgomery;
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

K-097  Growth Properties of a thyX Deletion Mutant of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

M-J. Park, S-H. Cho, H-G. Rhie;
Kyunghee Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

K-098  FolP2, A Functionally Encoded Dihydropteroate Synthase in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032.

S-K. Lee, E-K. Shin, S-H. Cho, H-G. Rhie;
Kyunghee Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

K-099  Expression of ilpA Gene Encoding an Immunogenic Lipoprotein in Pathogenic Bacterium, Vibrio vulnificus: Repression of ilpA Expression by Iron and Fur .

Y-S. Han1, S-J. Park2, K-H. Lee1;
1Hankuk Univ. Foreign Studies, Yongin, Kyunggi-Do, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Yonsei Univ Coll Med, Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

K-100  The Type III Pantothenate Kinase in Bacillus anthracis Is a Candidate for Therapeutic Intervention Against Anthrax Infection.

C. Paige1, S. D. Reid1, P. Hanna2, A. Claiborne1;
1Wake Forest Univ. Sch. of Med., Winston-Salem, NC, 2Univ. of Michigan Sch. of Med., Ann Arbor, MI.

K-101  Redirection of Homogentisate toward Vitamin E Biosynthesis in Rhodococcus.

L. B. Willis, T. G. Sambandan, K. Habermann, P. A. Lessard, I. Jhun, A. Grigorescu, C. Rha, A. J. Sinskey;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

K-102  The Connection between Methylotrophy and Iron Homeostasis in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1.

L. D. Palmer, E. Skovran, M. E. Lidstrom;
Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA.

K-103  Metabolic and Regulatory Networks in Extreme Acidophiles: Gaining Energy from Rocks at pH 2.

J. Valdes1, R. Quatrini1, E. Jedlicki2, I. Pedroso1, D. S. Holmes1;
1Ctr. for Bioinformatics and Genome Biology, Life Science Fndn, MIFAB and Andrés Bello Univ., Santiago, CHILE, 2ICBM, Faculty of Med., Univ. of Chile, Santiago, CHILE.

K-104  New Insights into Methylotrophic Metabolism and Regulation in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1.

E. Skovran, L. D. Palmer, M. E. Lidstrom;
Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA.

K-105  Functional Study of Carboxysome Operon Promoter(s) from Halothiobacillus neapolitanus.

S. Neidler1, F. Cai1, J. M. Shively2,1, G. C. Cannon1, S. Heinhorst1;
1The Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, 2Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC.

K-106  Genomic Response to Triacetonetriperoxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303.

V. L. McIntosh, Jr., J. Sanseverino, G. S. Sayler;
Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN.

 

173/K. Functional Genomics

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

K-107  Nudix Hydrolases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as Potential Novel Antibiotic Targets.

J. G. Thomson, J. N. Ramos, S. F. O'Handley;
Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY.

K-108  AraL from B. subtilis is a Sugar Phosphatase and Member of the Nitrophenyl Phosphatase Family of the HAD Superfamily.

J. K. Hill, S. F. O'Handley;
Rochester Inst. of Technology, Rochester, NY.

K-109  Base Resistance and Acid Resistance of Bacillus subtilis Are Associated with Transcriptomic Responses Including High-pH Upregulation of Respiratory Complexes and Arginine Catabolism.

G. E. Lee1, S. H. Cleeton1, C. S. Ugwu1, J. C. Wilks1, S. S. BonDurant2, B. D. Jones1, J. L. Slonczewski1;
1Kenyon Coll., Gambier, OH, 2Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

K-110  Characterization of Transporter Proteins Involved in Bile Tolerance in Lactobacillus acidophilus.

E. Pfeiler, T. Klaenhammer;
North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC.

K-111  Genome Based Metabolic Analysis and Growth Medium of MRSA Staphylococcus aureus.

V. Kapatral1, H. Burd1, Z. Oltvai2;
1Integrated Genomics, Chicago, IL, 2Univ. of Pittsburg, Pittsburgh, PA.

K-112  Transcriptome Analysis of Agmatine and Putrescine Catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

H. Chou, D-H. Kwon, M. Hegazy, C-D. Lu;
Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA.

K-113  A Proteomic Profile of a Novel Arsenite Oxidizing Bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii strain MLHE-1T.

C. Richey1, P. Chovanec1, S. Hoeft2, R. Oremland2, P. Basu1, J. Stolz1;
1Duquesne Univ., Pittsburgh, PA, 2USGS, Menlo Park, CA.

K-114  Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in Clinical and Bovine-Specific Genotypes of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

S. Kailasan Vanaja1, J. T. Riordan1, T. E. Besser2, T. S. Whittam1;
1Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI, 2Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA.

K-115  Functional Characterization of Two Putative Myosin Cross Reactive Antigen Genes from Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.

S. O'Flaherty, T. Klaenhammer;
North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC.

K-116  Functional Genomic Screening for Biofilm Mutants by Colony Morphology in Variovorax paradoxus EPS.

M. J. Pehl, K. Kong, P. M. Orwin;
California State Univ., San Bernardino, CA.

K-117  In Vivo Footprinting Analysis of Carbon Metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

Y. Liang1, J. Chen1, H. Gao1, K. H. Nealson2, J. M. Tiedje3, J. K. Fredrickson4, J. Zhou1;
1Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 2Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 3Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI, 4Pacific Northwest Natl. Lab., Richland, WA.

K-118  Systematic Analysis of Genetic Interaction of Escherichia coli.

R. Takeuchi1, F. Yanagihara1, N. Yamamoto1, K. A. Datsenko2, K. Nakahigashi3, A. Typas4, N. J. Krogan4, A. Emilli5, J. Greenblatt5, C. A. Gross4, B. L. Wanner2, H. Mori1;
1Nara Inst. of Sci. and Technology, Nara, JAPAN, 2Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN, 3Inst. of Advanced Biosciences, Keio Univ., Tsuruoka, JAPAN, 4Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA, 5Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CANADA.

K-119  Absolute Comparison of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data using Normalized Spectrum Counts to Estimate Protein Abundance.

D. R. Johnson1, N. C. VerBerkmoes2, S. H. Zinder3, L. Alvarez-Cohen1,4;
1Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 2Oak Ridge Natl. Lab., Oak Ridge, TN, 3Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY, 4Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA.

K-121  Contribution of rpoS and rpoN to Virulence and Stress-Fitness Gene Regulation in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

J. T. Riordan, A. C. Springman, T. S. Whittam;
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

K-122  Gene Expression Profiles of Clostridium botulinum Using Microarray.

Y-H. Lin;
California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA.

K-123  Distinct Transcriptional Responses of the Escherichia coli O157:H7 Spinach Outbreak Strain and the Sakai Strain Exposed to Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells (MAC-T).

G. S. Abu-Ali, L. M. Ouellette, T. S. Whittam;
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

K-124  Experimental Determination and Data Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions in Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

D. A. Pelletier1, G. B. Hurst1, P. K. Lankford1, C. K. McKeown1, T-Y. S. Lu1, E. T. Owens1, D. D. Schmoyer1, J. L. Morrell-Falvey1, W. H. McDonald1, M. Shah1, M. J. Doktycz1, B. S. Hooker2, W. R. Cannon2, D. Daly2, M. Singhal2, R. Taylor2, M. V. Buchanan1;
1Oak Ridge Natl. Lab., Oak Ridge, TN, 2Pacific Northwest Natl. Lab., Richland, WA.

K-125  Optimizing Photosynthetic Light Harvesting Capacity: Molecular Evolutionary and Functional Genomic Analyses of the Chlorophyll-Binding Antenna in Prochlorococcus.

M. E. Ramsey, C. S. Ting;
Williams Coll., Williamstown, MA.

K-126  The Role of Calcium in Bacteria: A Proteomic Approach.

R. Lopes, D. C. Dominguez;
The Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX.

K-127  Identification of Multiprotein Complexes in Helicobacter pylori Using the Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP) Technology.

K. Stingl1,2, D. Leduc1, K. Schauer1, C. Ecobichon1, A. Labigne1, P. Lenormand1, J-C. Rousselle1, A. Namane1, H. De Reuse1;
1Inst. Pasteur, Paris, FRANCE, 2Inst. fuer Allgemeine Zoologie und Genetik, Muenster, GERMANY.

K-128  Functional Characterization of Small Proteins and Small RNAs in Escherichia coli by Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis.

E. C. Hobbs, J. L. Astarita, G. Storz;
NIH, Bethesda, MD.

K-129  Systematic Metabolic Perturbation Analysis of Transcriptional Regulation of Amino Acid and Nucleotide Metabolism in Escherichia coli.

D. P. Sangurdekar;
Univ. of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN.

K-130  Development of a Quantitative Method for Measuring Binding Affinities in Live Cells Using Fluorescence Imaging Techniques.

A. N. Edwards1,2, J. D. Fowlkes2, R. F. Standaert2, M. J. Doktycz2, J. L. Morrell-Falvey2;
1Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2Oak Ridge Natl. Lab., Oak Ridge, TN.

K-131  E. coli-Synthetic Genetic Arrays (eSGA): Uncovering Functional Relationships on a Genome-Wide Scale.

G. Butland1, M. Babu2, H. Lo2, B. Gold1, C. Christopolous2, W. Yang1, R. Prathapam1, O. Pogoutse2, J. Li2, J. Wasniewski2, P. Venn2, F. Bohdana2, A. Safavi-Naini2, N. Sourour2, S. Caron2, L. Laigle2, S. Phanse2, A. Deshpande2, S. Joe2, H. Ding2, M. Maris2, G. Moreno-Hagelseib3, J. Greenblatt2, A. Emili2;
1Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA, 2Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CANADA, 3Wilfrid Laurier Univ., Waterloo, ON, CANADA.

K-132  Phenotypic Characterization of Microorganisms by Barcoded Transposon Mutagenesis.

A. Deutschbauer1, J. Oh2, M. Price1, P. Dehal1, D. Bruno2, J. Kuehl1, R. Chakraborty1, T. C. Hazen1, C. Nislow3, G. Giaever3, R. W. Davis2, A. P. Arkin1;
1Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA, 2Stanford Genome Technology Ctr., Stanford, CA, 3Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CANADA.

K-133  EcoliHub: Development of the Information Resource.

B. L. Wanner1, W. G. Aref1, K. Datsenko1, S. Ess1, M. R. Gribskov1, D. Kihara1, S. Kim1, H. Mori2, D. R. Whitaker1;
1Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN, 2Nara Inst. of Sci. and Technology, Ikoma, JAPAN.

K-134  Adhesion, Biofilm Formation and Invasion Ability in Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes are Impaired by the Action of a Bacterial Exoprotease.

G. Scoarughi1, C. Longhi1, A. Cellini1, R. Papa1, A. Carpentieri2, L. Seganti1, P. Pucci2, A. Amoresano2, P. Cocconcelli3, S. Gazzola3, M. Artini1, L. Selan1;
1Univ. of Rome La Sapienza, Rome, ITALY, 2Univ. of Naples Federico II, Naples, ITALY, 3Univ. Cattolica Piacenza, Piacenza, ITALY.

 

174/N. Extreme Environments - II

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

N-179  DNA Repair Capacity of the Great Salt Plains Cyanobacterium Aphanothece (SP24).

R. G. Biswas, R. V. Miller, D. Williams;
Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK.

N-180  Microbial Diversity and Functional Ecology of the Great Salt Lake.

G. Rompato1, J. Parnell2, B. Ganesan1, B. Weimer1;
1Ctr. for Integrated BioSystems, Utah State Univ., Logan, UT, 2Utah State Univ., Logan, UT.

N-181  High Levels of Microbial Biomass and Activity in Unvegetated Tropical and Temperate Alpine Soils.

A. J. King, S. Schmidt, A. Meyer;
Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO.

N-182  Borup Fiord: A Unique Glacial-Sulfur Spring Environment in the Canadian High Arctic.

C. Williamson, J. Spear;
Colorado Sch. of Mines, Golden, CO.

N-183  Characterization of an Antarctic Soil Community from the Transantarctic Mountain Range.

R. S. Hutchison, Z. Ashfaq, R. Strassle, N. Cornet, T. Harmer-Luke;
Stockton Coll., Pomona, NJ.

N-184  Factors Affecting Enterococcus-Like Organisms in the Great Salt Lake: Influence of Water Depth, Season and Additional Physical Parameters.

S. Kagie, W. Lorowitz, A. Noland, K. Nakaoka;
Weber State Univ., Ogden, UT.

N-185  Inter-Annual Stability of Microbial Community Composition in Three Perennially Ice-Covered Lake Systems in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

W. Foo, S-K. Han, B. Lanoil;
Univ. of California, Riverside, CA.

N-186  Sediment Archaea Community Depth Profile from Lake Fryxell, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

C. Tang, B. Lanoil;
Univ. of California, Riverside, CA.

N-187  Exploration of the Microbial Communities at Devils Hole.

M. C. Ehrsam1,2, S. K. Labahn1,3, T. Fisk4, M. Bower4, K. Acharya1, M. Stone1, D. P. Moser1;
1Desert Res. Inst., Las Vegas, NV, 2Univ. of Nevada Sch. of Med., Las Vegas, NV, 3Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, 4Natl. Park Service, Death Valley, CA.

N-188  The Effect of Moisture on Soil Microbial Communities in the Mojave Desert.

E. P. Bryant1, S. Rech1, C. P. McKay2;
1San Jose State Univ., San Jose, CA, 2NASA Ames Res. Ctr., Mountain View, CA.

N-189  A Time Series of Continuously Coregistered Temperature, Chemistry and Microbiology at a Diffuse Flow Hydrothermal Vent at the Juan de Fuca Ridge.

J. Robidart1, G. Wheat2, P. Girguis1;
1Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA, 2Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK.

N-190  Detection of Free-Living Symbionts of Bathymodioline Mussels (Bivalvia: Mollusca) at Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents.

K. M. Fontanez, C. M. Cavanaugh;
Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA.

N-191  Endolithic Microbial Communities of Juan de Fuca Ridge Hydrothermal Vent Chimneys.

E. E. Cordes1, G. Wheat2, D. Kelley3, P. Girguis1;
1Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA, 2Monterey Bay Aquarium Res. Inst., Moss Landing, CA, 3Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA.

N-192  Transduction as a Mechanism of Microbial Diversity and Evolution in Soda Lakes.

H. C. Pinkart1, M. Storrie-Lombardi2;
1Central Washington Univ., Ellensburg, WA, 2Kinohi Res. Inst., Pasadena, CA.

N-193  Comparison of Cultivable Purple Non-Sulfur Anoxyphototrophs from Tropical Hypersaline Microbial Mats at Cabo Rojo Salterns of Puerto Rico during Seasonal Changes.

K. M. Soto-Feliciano1, L. F. Hernández-Cabassa1, P. Sahai1, K. Y. Flores-Burgos1, L. Casillas-Martínez2, C. Ríos-Velázquez1;
1Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PUERTO RICO, 2Univ. of Puerto Rico, Humacao, PUERTO RICO.

N-194  Isolation and Characterization of Radiation Resistance Microbes from Tropical Hypersaline Microbial Mats at the Cabo Rojo Salterns in Puerto Rico.

K. Diaz Carrillo1, C. Rivera1, V. Irizarry-Vargas1, A. Agosto-Mujica2, V. Cardona-Cardona1, C. Rios-Velazquez1;
1Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PUERTO RICO, 2Univ. del Este, Carolina, PUERTO RICO.

N-195  Comparative Analysis of Winter and Summer End-Sequence Libraries from Antarctic Bacterioplankton Reveals Major Differences in Diversity of Organisms and Function.

J. Grzymski1, S. G. Tringe2, H. Ducklow3, A. Murray1;
1Desert Res. Inst., Reno, NV, 2US DOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA, 3Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA.

N-196  Phylogenetic Analysis and a Starch-Iodide Screening Method for the Isolation of Arsenic-Oxidizing Thermus spp. from the Hot Springs of Hot Creek, CA.

R. A. Barco1, T. M. Salmassi2;
1Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 2California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA.

N-197  Characterization and Classification of Thermophiles from Hot Creek, CA by Molecular Methods.

Y-J. Chen1, R. A. Barco2, T. M. Salmassi1;
1California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA, 2Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.

N-198  Microbial Communities of a Saline, Alkaline Terminal Lake (Walker Lake, NV).

J. C. Bruckner1, C. H. Fritsen2, J. C. Memmot2, R. L. Hersey2, A. Heyvaert2, D. P. Moser1;
1Desert Research Inst., Las Vegas, NV, 2Desert Research Inst., Reno, NV.

 

175/N. Molecular Microbial Ecology - Communities - III

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

N-199  Vaginal Microbiota of Women with Recurrent Vulvovaginal Candidiasis.

X. Zhou1, R. Westman1, R. Hickey1, M. A. Hansmann2, C. Kennedy3, L. J. Forney1;
1Univ. of Idaho, Pullman, WA, 2Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH, 3Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.

N-200  Microbial Community Dynamics and the Effect of Geochemistry in Uranium Bioremediation Revealed by Functional Gene Array Analysis.

L. Wu1, Z. Huang2, T. J. Gentry3, W. Wu4, Z. He1, J. D. Van Nostrand1, C. W. Schadt2, D. Watson2, P. Jardine2, C. S. Criddle4, J. Tiedje5, T. C. Hazen6, J. Zhou1;
1The Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 2Oak Ridge Natl. Lab., Oak Ridge, TN, 3Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX, 4Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA, 5Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI, 6Virtual Inst. for Microbial Stress and Survial, Berkeley, CA.

N-201  Citrate Synthase: A Functional Genetic Marker to Study Effects of Climate Drivers on Soil Microbial Communities.

E. E. Austin, H. F. Castro, A. T. Classen, C. W. Schadt;
Oak Ridge Natl. Lab., Oak Ridge, TN.

N-202  Metagenomics-Enabled Understanding of the Effect of Climate Warming on Underground Microbial Communities and Its Interaction with Aboveground Plant Populations.

L. Wu, J. Xie, Z. He, L. Kellogg, Y. Luo, R. Sherry, J. Zhou;
The Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK.

N-203  A Protocol for Rapid and Efficient Bacterial Community Analysis using Pyrosequencing.

Q. Wang, B. Chai, W. Sul, D. M. Tourlousse, R. C. Penton, A. S. Kulam-Syed-Mohideen, D. M. McGarrell, J. M. Tiedje, J. R. Cole;
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

N-204  Molecular Detection of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidizing (ANAMMOX) Bacteria in North Carolina Groundwater Aquifers.

M. D. Hirsch, B. Song;
Univ. of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC.

N-205  Analysis of 16S rDNA and Metagenomic Sequences Revealed Microbial Community and Host-Specific Sequences of Canadian Geese Feces.

J. Lu1, J. W. Santo Domingo1, T. Edge2, S. Hill2;
1US EPA, Cincinnati, OH, 2Natl. Water Res. Inst., Environment Canada, Burlington, ON, CANADA.

N-206  Specific Microbial Populations Thrive under Fluctuating Redox Conditions in Tropical Soils.

K. M. DeAngelis1, W. L. Silver2, A. W. Thompson2, M. K. Firestone2;
1Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA, 2Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA.

N-207  Diversity of Methanogens and Sulfur-Reducers in the Sediments of a Constructed Wetland in Monterey County, CA.

P. Matheus-Carnevali, S. Rech;
San Jose State Univ., San Jose, CA.

N-208  Identification of Active Bacterial Communities in Drinking Water Using 16S rRNA-Based Sequence Analyses.

R. P. Revetta, A. Pemberton, J. W. Santo Domingo;
US EPA, Cincinnati, OH.

N-209  Phylogenetic Diversity and Membership Patterns of Fecal and Environmental Bacteroidales Populations.

R. Lamendella1, D. B. Oerther1, J. W. Santo Domingo2;
1Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 2US EPA, Cincinnati, OH.

N-210  Composition, Diversity, and Novelty within Soil Proteobacteria.

A. M. Spain1, L. R. Krumholz1, M. S. Elshahed2;
1Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 2Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK.

N-211  GeoChip Analysis of Subsurface Microbial Communities Impacted by Heavy Metal and Nitrate Contamination.

P. J. Waldron1,2, J. D. Van Nostrand1,2, D. B. Watson3, Z. He1,2, L. Y. Wu1,2, P. M. Jardine3, T. C. Hazen4,2, J. Z. Zhou1,2;
1Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 2Virtual Inst. for Microbial Stress and Survival, Berkeley, CA, 3Oak Ridge Natl. Lab., Oak Ridge, TN, 4Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA.

N-212  Effects of Sampling Time and Location of Rumen Contents on Rumen pH, Microbial Diversity and Metabolites.

M. Li, G. Penner, M. Oba, L. L. Guan;
Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CANADA.

N-213  Functional Gene Array-Based Analysis of Microbial Community Structure in a Gradient of Nitrate and Heavy Metal Contaminated Groundwaters.

P. J. Waldron1,2, L. Y. Wu1, J. D. Van Nostrand1,2, D. B. Watson3, Z. He1,2, C. W. Schadt3,2, T. C. Hazen4,2, P. M. Jardine3, J. Z. Zhou1,2;
1Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 2Virtual Inst. for Microbial Stress and Survival, Berkeley, CA, 3Oak Ridge Natl. Lab., Oak Ridge, TN, 4Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA.

N-214  13C-Propionic Acid Stable Isotope Probing of an Thermophilic Methanogenic Digester.

A. M. Smith1, H. M. Lappin-Scott2, S. K. Burton2, D. H. Huber1;
1West Virginia State Univ., Institute, WV, 2Univ. of Exeter, Exeter, UNITED KINGDOM.

N-215  Development of a System to Quantify Denitrifier Gene Expression in Agricultural Soil and to Study its Relation to Nitrous Oxide Flux and Denitrification.

S. L. Henderson1, C. E. Dandie2, C. Goyer2, C. Patten1, B. J. Zebarth2, D. L. Burton3, J. T. Trevors4;
1Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, CANADA, 2Agriculture and Agrifood Canada, Fredericton, NB, CANADA, 3Nova Scotia Agricultural Coll., Truro, NS, CANADA, 4Univ. of Guelph, Guelph, ON, CANADA.

N-216  An Analysis of Bacterial and Fungal Biofilms Inhabiting Concrete Surfaces.

D. J. Giannantonio, J. C. Kurth, K. E. Kurtis, P. A. Sobecky;
Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA.

N-217  Photosynthetic Mats and Surface Sediments in Lake Huron Sinkholes Contain Cyanobacteria Related to Antarctic Clones and Sulfate Reducing Proteobacteria .

J. B. Pangborn1, H. A. Zajack1, B. A. Biddanda2, S. C. Nold1;
1Univ. of Wisconsin, Menomonie, WI, 2Grand Valley State Univ., Muskegon, MI.

N-218  Diversity of Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria in California Soils by Comparative Stable Isotope Probing.

S. Han, B. D. Lanoil;
Univ. of California, Riverside, CA.

N-219  Quantitation of Population Growth and Decay for Organisms Present in a Chloroethene Reducing Enrichment Culture.

A. R. Rowe, G. L. Heavner, R. E. Richardson;
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

N-220  Swine Fecal Metagenomics.

R. Lamendella1, S. Ghosh1, D. B. Oerther1, J. Martinson2, J. W. Santo Domingo2;
1University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 2US EPA, Cincinnati, OH.

N-221  Growth of Multiple Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans Populations and a Pseudomonas stutzeri Strain, using DNA-SIP, in a Single Anaerobic 2,6-Dichlorophenol Soil Enrichment Culture.

R. A. Sanford1, J. C. Chee-Sanford2, L. M. Connor2, A. Thorp3, F. E. Loeffler3;
1Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2USDA/ARS, Urbana, IL, 3Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA.

N-222  Archaea and mcrA Genes in the Water Column above Gas Hydrates and Cold Seeps in the Gulf of Mexico.

B. Liu1, F. Wang2, G. Ye2, L. Wu3, F. Zhou1, Z. Huang1, J. Zhou3, J. Noakes1, C. L. Zhang1;
1Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2The Third Inst. of Oceanography, Xiamen, CHINA, 3Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK.

N-223  Analysis of Microbial Communities Present During Post-Harvest Fermentation of Trinidadian Cocoa.

A. C. Kurzweil, R. P. Roberts, L. E. Wimmers, J. E. M. Watts;
Towson Univ., Towson, MD.

N-224  Diversity of Chloroflexus-Like Organisms in an Iron-Depositing Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park.

M. N. Parenteau1, S. M. Boomer2, K. L. Noll2, B. E. Dutton2, S. L. Cady3, L. L. Jahnke1, B. K. Pierson4;
1NASA Ames Res. Ctr., Moffett Field, CA, 2Western Oregon Univ., Monmouth, OR, 3Portland State Univ., Portland, OR, 4Univ. of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA.

N-225  Functional Microbial Ecology in the Bovine Rumen.

E. Hernandez-Sanabria, M. Li, M. Gaenzle, L. L. Guan;
Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CANADA.

N-226  Inter- and Intra- Individual Variation in the Human Gut Microbial Community.

M. Hullar1, K. Stepaniants1, F. Li2, C. Atkinson3, J. Lampe1,2;
1Fred Hutchainson Cancer Res. Ctr., Seattle, WA, 2Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA, 3Bristol Dent. Sch., Bristol, UNITED KINGDOM.

N-227  Microbial Community Structure of Feedlot Cattle Feces.

L. M. Durso, G. P. Harhay, M. L. Clawson, W. W. Laegreid, J. L. Bono, J. E. Keen, T. P. L. Smith;
USDA/ARS, Clay Center, NE.

N-228  Diversity and Quantification of Candidate Division SR1 in Various Anaerobic Environments.

J. P. Davis, M. Elshahed;
Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK.

 

176/O. Genetics, Gene Expression and Protein Production

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

O-016  Metabolic Engineering of Lactococcus lactis for the Development of a One-Step Bioconversion of Lactose into Tagatose.

J-H. Lee, D. J. O'Sullivan;
Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.

O-017  Ethanol Fermentation from Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate by a Recombinant Xylose- and Cellooligosaccharide-Assimilating Yeast Strain.

A. Kondo, R. Yamada, S. Katahira, T. Tanaka, C. Ogino, H. Fukuda;
Kobe Univ., Kobe, JAPAN.

O-019  Expression, Characterization, and Application of DNA Polymerase I Derived from Thermus kawarayensis.

N. Kurosawa1, H. Matsukawa2;
1Soka Univ., Tokyo, JAPAN, 2Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka, JAPAN.

O-020  Isolation and Characterization of Isoeugenol-Degrading Gene from Pseudomonas nitroreducens Jin1.

J-Y. Ryu1, K. W. Widmer1, J-H. Ahn2, M. J. Sadowsky3, H-G. Hur1;
1Gwangju Inst. of Sci. and Technology, Gwangju, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 2Konkuk Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA, 3Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.

O-021  Application and Development of the Arming Yeast System to Oral Vaccination for the Cultured Marine Fishes.

Y. Tamaru;
Mie Univ., Mie-ken, JAPAN.

O-022  Genetic Improvement of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aegypti for Industrial Production of the Biopesticide: AGERIN®.

Y. A. O. Ellazeik;
Mansoura Univ., Mansoura, EGYPT.

O-023  Engineering of a Plasmid Display System for the Directed Evolution of Targeted Cell Penetrating Peptides.

S. Gao, M. J. Simon, B. Morrison III, S. Banta;
Columbia Univ., New York, NY.

O-024  The Ga1 Protein Regulates Aspergillus niger Growth and Development and the Citric Acid Production in Response to Nitrogen Sources.

Z. Dai, K. S. Panther, K. S. Brunno, J. K. Magnuson, S. E. Baker, L. L. Lasure;
Pacific Northwest Natl. Lab., Richland, WA.

O-025  Overexpression of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway Gene, ZWF1, Protects Yeast from Furfural Induced Cellular Damage.

S. W. Gorsich, S. Allen, W. Clark, Z. Cai;
Central Michigan Univ., Mount Pleasant, MI.

 

177/O. Proteomics, Microarray Analysis and Genomics

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

O-026  Genome Sequence and Analysis of the Methylotrophic Yeast, Pichia pastoris.

A. Bhattacharyya1, L. Chu1, J. M. Cregg2;
1Integrated Genomics, Inc., Chicago, IL, 2Keck Graduate Inst. of Applied Life Sci., Claremont, CA.

O-027  Shotgun Proteomics Sheds Light on Frankia Metabolism in Culture.

Y. Huang, J. E. Mastronunzio, D. R. Benson;
Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

O-028  Immunoproteomic Profiling of Streptococcus pneunomiae Using Human Patient Sera and a Protein Microarray Technology Platform.

K. Kwon1, E. Snesrud1, C. Grose1, J. Hasseman1, S. Latham1, D. Yu1, S. Sarria1, T. Mitchell2, G. Pandya1, R. Pieper1, R. Fleischmann1, S. Peterson1;
1J. Craig Venter Inst., Rockville, MD, 2Glasgow Biomedical Res. Cre., Univ. of Glasgow, Glasgow, UNITED KINGDOM.

O-029  Application of Systems Biology Tools to Unravel the Mechanisms of Acetate Tolerance in Zymomonas mobilis .

S. Yang1, D. A. Pelletier1, C. Pan1, T. J. Tschaplinski1, S. L. Martin2, N. L. Engle1, G. B. Hurst1, N. F. Samatova1, Y. Yang1, S. D. Brown1;
1Oak Ridge Natl. Lab., Oak Ridge, TN, 2North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC.

O-030  Proteomic Approach for Molecular Mechanisms under Ethanol Stress in Lactobacillus buchneri.

S. Liu;
USDA, ARS, NCAUR, Peoria, IL.

 

178/O. Emerging Technology and Instrumentation

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

O-031  Oxidative-Stress-Induced Metabolite Production with Sonocatalytic Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species.

T. Katsuda1, C. Ogino1, H. Iwasaki1, K. Yamagami1, S. Katoh1, N. Shimizu2;
1Kobe Univ., Kobe, JAPAN, 2Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa, JAPAN.

O-032  Fermentation of Pressurized Batch Hot Water (PBHW) Pretreated Warm Season Grasses and Inhibitor Analysis for Determination of Value-Added Coproducts.

S. K. Brandon1, W. F. Anderson2, C. K. Chambliss3, L. N. Sharma3, J. Doran-Peterson1;
1Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2USDA/ARS, Tifton, GA, 3Baylor Univ., Waco, TX.

O-033  Application for a Rapid Flow Cytometry Method for Process Control Bioburden Testing in Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Intermediates.

P. K. Bhusari1, M. S. Galinski1, A. M. Steger2;
1MedImmune Vaccines, Inc., Mountain View, CA, 2Advanced Analytical Technologies, Inc., Ames, IA.

 

179/P. Foodborne Pathogens - II

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

P-021  Incidences and Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella Schwarzengrund Isolates from Humans and Chicken in Taiwan.

M-H. Chen1, C-L. Li2, Y-C. Yang2, C-S. Chiou3, H-Y. Tsen2;
1Natl. Chung-Hsing Univ., Taichung, TAIWAN, 2Hung-Kuang Univ., Taichung County, TAIWAN, 3Center for Disease Control, Taichung, TAIWAN.

P-022  Antibacterial Effect of Peanut Skin Polyphenols on Raw Ground Beef Patties.

J. Yu, M. Ahmedna, I. Goktepe;
North Carolina A&T State Univ., Greensboro, NC.

P-023  Identification and Characterization of Class 1 Integron Resistance Genes Cassettes among Salmonella Strains from Imported Seafood.

A. A. Khan1, E. Ponce2, C-M. Cheng3, M. Nawaz1, C. Summage-West1;
1US FDA/NCTR, Jefferson, AR, 2Centro de Investigacionientifica y de Educaion Superior de Ensenada (CICESE), Ensenada, MEXICO, 3USFDA, Pacific Regional Lab.-SW, Irving, CA.

P-024  PFGE Genotyping and Antimicrobial Resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium Isolated from Pigs, Cattle and Humans in Korea.

T-W. Hahn, M-S. Joo, Z-W. Kang;
Kangwon Natl. Univ., Chuncheon, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

P-025  Fecal Contamination of Aguaje Fruit among Vendors in Iquitos, Peru: A Possible Source of Diarrheal Diseases.

B. J. Oberg1, S. Tringali1, J. Waits1, B. Wynn1, C. Oberg2;
1Touro Univ. Nevada, Henderson, NV, 2Weber State Univ., Ogden, UT.

P-026  Comparison of Transcriptomic Profiles of Salmonella enterica Enteritidis and Typhimurium under Oxidative Stress.

S. Wang1, A. M. Phillippy2, D. S. Stewart3, S. L. Salzberg2, M. Tortorello3, W. Zhang1,4;
1Illinois Inst. of Technology, Summit, IL, 2Ctr. for Bioinformatics and Computational Biol., Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD, 3US FDA/ NCFST, Summit, IL, 4Natl. Ctr. for Food Safety and Technology, Illinois Inst. of Technology, Summit, IL.

P-027  Fate of Foodborne Pathogens in Expelled Fecal Pellets of a Ciliated Protozoan.

C. T. Pannell1, M. T. Brandl2, B. Goodson1, M. J. M. Wells1, S. G. Berk1;
1Tennessee Tech. Univ., Cookeville, TN, 2USDA, Albany, CA.

P-028  Role of Soil, Crop Debris, and a Plant Pathogen in Salmonella enterica Contamination of Tomato Plants.

J. D. Barak, A. S. Liang;
USDA/ARS/WRRC, Albany, CA.

P-029  Comparison of Resistance to Heat, Ultra High Pressure and Antibiotics among Salmonella Serovars.

J. J. Perry, A. E. Yousef;
The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH.

P-030  Different Clones of Salmonella 4,5,12:I:- Isolates in Different Continents Causing Outbreaks.

Y. Soyer1, A. Moreno2, M. A. Davis3, J. Maurer4, P. L. McDonough1, L. D. Warnick1, Y. T. Grohn1, M. Wiedmann1;
1Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY, 2Univ. de Concepcion, Concepcion, CHILE, 3Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA, 4Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

P-031  Osmoregulated Periplasmic Glucans (OPGs) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Are Needed for Optimal Growth under Nutrient Limiting- Hypoosmotic Conditions.

L. Liu1,2, P. Kannan2, J. Meng3, A. A. Bhagwat2;
1Northwest A&F Univ., Yangling, CHINA, 2USDA/ARS, Beltsville, MD, 3Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD.

P-032  Growth and Survival of Acid-Resistant and Non Acid Resistant Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) Strains in Experimentally Contaminated French Sausages.

M-P. Montet1, V. Coppet2, S. Ganet1, M-L. Delignette-Muller1, S. Christieans2, S. Miszczycha1, D. Thevenot1, C. Vernozy-Rozand1;
1ENVL, Marcy l'Etoile, FRANCE, 2ADIV, Clermont Ferrand, FRANCE.

P-033  Growth and Survival of Acid-Resistant and Non-Acid Resistant Shiga - Toxin Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) Strains during the Manufacture and Ripening of Microfiltered Milk Lactic Cheeses.

M-P. Montet1, E. Jamet2, S. Ganet1, M. Dizin2, S. Miszczycha1, D. Thevenot1, C. Vernozy-Rozand1;
1ENVL, Marcy l'Etoile, FRANCE, 2ITFF, La Roche sur Foron, FRANCE.

P-034  Reduction of Vibrio vulnificus Numbers in Oysters Using a Flow through Depuration System.

R. Wood, S. Rikard, Y. Brady, R. Wallace, C. R. Arias;
Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL.

P-035  Comparative Genome Analysis of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Reveals Distinct Genomic Islands between Pandemic and Non-Pandemic Strains.

R. G. Gavilan, J. Martinez-Urtaza;
Univ. of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, SPAIN.

P-036  The CsgA and Lpp Proteins of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 Strain 43895OR Affect Motility and Host Cell Invasion.

G. A. Uhlich1, D. O. Bayles2, D. A. Mosier3;
1USDA/ARS Eastern Regional Res. Cir., Wyndmoor, PA, 2USDA/ARS Natl. Animal Disease Ctr., Ames, IA, 3Coll. of Vet. Med., Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS.

P-037  A Novel Small Acid Soluble Protein Variant Is Important for the Exceptional Spore Resistance of Most Clostridium perfringens Food Poisoning Isolates.

B. A. McClane, J. Li;
Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Med., Pittsburgh, PA.

P-038  Comparison of the Binding of E. coli K12 and O157:H7 to Alfalfa Sprouts and Cut Lettuce Leaves.

R. B. Smith, A. G. Matthysse;
Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.

P-039  Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains that Persist in Cattle Populations Are Characterized by Enhanced Ability to Adhere to Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

B. A. Carlson, J. N. Sofos, G. C. Smith, K. E. Belk, K. K. Nightingale;
Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO.

P-040  Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Tetracycline-Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Catfish.

M. S. Nawaz, A. A. Khan, S. A. Khan, K. Sung, R. S. Steele;
US FDA/NCTR, Jefferson, AR.

P-041  Inability of Exponentially Growing Cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to Induce Glutamate-Dependant Acid Resistance and Survive pH 2 Acid Shock.

S. Viazis1, A. Olstein2, F. Diez-Gonzalez1;
1Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 2Paradigm Diagnostics, Inc., St. Paul, MN.

P-042  Genome Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni Strain M1.

C. Friis1, T. Wassenaar1, D. G. Newell2, M. Toszeghy2, A. Ridley2, G. Manning2, D. W. Ussery1;
1Ctr. for Biological Sequence Analysis, Lyngby, DENMARK, 2Vet. Lab. Agency, Addlestone, UNITED KINGDOM.

P-043  The Use of Macrolide Antibiotics in Turkeys and Subsequent Effects on the Emergence of Macrolide Resistant Campylobacter Species.

G. T. Danzeisen, J. S. Sherwood, J. L. Thorsness, J. E. Axtman, C. M. Logue;
North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND.

P-044  Analysis of Campylobacter Plasmids from Different Hosts.

E. M. L. Johnson, M. K. Fakhr, S. R. Petermann, J. S. Sherwood, C. M. Logue;
North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND.

P-045  Optimization of an Elution and Concentration Method for the Detection of Enteric Viruses in Fresh Strawberries and Lettuces.

S. Cheong, C. Lee, W. Choi, S-J. Kim;
Seoul Natl. Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

P-046  Genotyping of Cronobacter species from Infant Formula Production Environments.

C. Iversen1, A. Lehner1, C. Feer2, K. Gschwend2, R. Stephan1;
1Inst. for Food Safety and Hygiene, Univ. Zurich, Zurich, SWITZERLAND, 2Hochdorf Nutritec AG, Hochdorf, SWITZERLAND.

P-047  Distribution of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus Levels in U.S. Market Oysters.

J. L. Nordstrom1, J. C. Bowers2, J. A. Krantz1, K. R. Calci1, R. Byars3, J. Johnson4, K. Kasturi5, M. Kawalek6, E. Gonzalez5, J. Obando5, J. Versace5, L. Phan6, K. Thammasouk4, S. Eliasberg3, L. Chatman3, J. Welch3, A. DePaola1;
1US FDA/GCSL, Dauphin Island, AL, 2US FDA/CFSAN, College Park, MD, 3US FDA/ORA, Atlanta, GA, 4US FDA/ORA, Bothell, WA, 5US FDA/ORA, Jamaica, NY, 6US FDA/ORA, Irvine, CA.

P-048  Campylobacter Pathotype Analysis.

C. M. Logue, J. S. Sherwood, M. K. Fakhr, E. Lutgen Johnson, S. R. Petermann;
North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND.

P-049  Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni Whole Genome DNA Microarrays to Identify Gene Differences for Use in Strain Subtyping.

M. D. Englen1, L. G. Pittenger-Alley1, J. G. Frye1, J. Reeves2, V. McNerney2, P. J. Fedorka-Cray1, M. A. Harrison2;
1USDA/ARS, Athens, GA, 2Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

P-050  Detection of Additional Genes of the Patulin Biosynthetic Pathway in Penicillium griseofulvum.

M. Dombrink-Kurtzman;
USDA/ARS/NCAUR, Peoria, IL.

 

180/P. Foodborne Pathogens - III

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

P-051  Development of a Real Time PCR Method for the Detection of Yersinia enterocolitica in Green Leafy Vegetables.

A. A. Rodriguez1, P. M. Regan1, A. B. Margolin2;
1U.S. FDA, Winchester, MA, 2Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH.

P-052  Variations in Chlorine and Acid Resistance among Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains Implicated in Foodborne Disease Outbreaks.

S. Wang1, X. Deng1, D. S. Stewart2, M. Tortorello2, W. Zhang1;
1Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL, 2US FDA Natl. Ctr. for Food Safety and Technology, Summit, IL.

P-053  Fitness Cost of Macrolide Resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

F. Han, S. Pu, B. Ge;
Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA.

P-054  Prevalence of Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Thermophilic Campylobacters from Turkeys in North Carolina before and after the Fluoroquinolone Ban.

W. Gu, M. Islam, R. Siletzky, S. Kathariou;
North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC.

P-055  Characterization of Spores of Clostridium perfringens that Lack SpoVA Proteins and Dipicolinic Acid.

D. Paredes-Sabja1, B. Setlow2, P. Setlow2, M. R. Sarker1;
1Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR, 2Univ. of Connecticut Hlth. Ctr., Farmington, CT.

P-056  Roles of DacB and Spm Proteins in Clostridium perfringens Spore Resistance to Moist Heat, Chemicals and UV Radiation.

D. Paredes-Sabja1, N. Sarker1, B. Setlow2, P. Setlow2, M. R. Sarker1;
1Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR, 2Univ. of Connecticut Hlth. Ctr., Farmington, CT.

P-057  Persistence of Representative Members of the Norovirus Genus on Foods and Food Contact Surfaces.

B. Escudero-Abarca, H. Rawsthorne, C. Gensel, L-A. Jaykus;
North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC.

P-058  Cloning and Partial Characterization of a Novel Vibrio tubiashii Hemolysin Gene and the Development of a PCR Based Detection for V. tubiashii.

V. Sathyamoorthy, A. R. Datta, C. J. Lee, B. D. Tall, B. A. McCardell, M. H. Kothary;
US FDA, Laurel, MD.

P-059  Bacteriophage-Based Biosorbent for Specific Capture, Concentration and Detection of Bacteria.

M. H. Tolba1,2, L. Brovko1,2, M. W. Griffiths1,2;
1Univ. of Guelph, Guelph, ON, CANADA, 2Canadian Res. Inst. for Food Safety, Guelph, ON, CANADA.

P-060  Relatedness of Bison and Bovine Fecal Isolates of Enterobacter sakazakii to Environmental, Clinical, and Food Isolates by Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis.

T. A. Solseng, T. Johnson, H. Vinson, L. M. Nangoh, P. S. Gibbs;
North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND.

P-061  Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Isolates from 2006 Outbreaks Linked to Fresh Produce.

B. Li, S. Gebru, G. L. George, D. Roberson, D. W. Lacher, M. L. Kotewicz, J. E. LeClerc, T. A. Cebula;
US FDA, Laurel, MD.

P-062  Isolation and Characterization of Brucella Strains Isolated from Chihuahua Cheese Elaborated with Unpasteurized Milk.

G. L. Viezcas-Valenzuela1, L. E. Escobedo-Morales1, M. L. Aceves-Bassanetti1, M. G. Gastélum-Franco1, N. Herrera-Díaz1, M. Contreras2, G. V. Nevárez-Moorillón1, B. E. Rivera-Chavira1;
1Univ. Autonoma de Chihuahua, Chihuahua, MEXICO, 2Programa COESPRIS. Edo. Chihuahua, Chihuahua, MEXICO.

P-063  Phenotypic Microarray of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Isolates from the 2006 Outbreaks Linked to Fresh Produce.

A. Mukherjee, M. K. Mammel, J. E. LeClerc, T. A. Cebula;
US FDA, Laurel, MD.

P-064  Expression of the Phosphate Specific Transport (Pst) System of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Treated with 0.5% Sodium Benzoate.

F. J. Critzer, D. H. D'Souza, D. A. Golden;
Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN.

P-065  Spore Appendages of the Toxigenic B. cereus Group.

R. Labbe, A. Sayedahmed;
Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

P-066  A cobA Based Bacteriophage Reporter for Detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

P. Romero, L. Perry, M. Morgan, B. Applegate;
Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN.

P-067  A Longitudinal Study on Listeria monocytogenes Contamination Patterns in Small and Very Small Ready-To-Eat Meat Processing Plants.

S. K. Williams1, S. Roof2, E. A. Boyle3, H. Thippareddi4, D. Burson4, K. K. Nightingale1, M. Wiedmann2, J. A. Scanga1, J. N. Sofos1;
1Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO, 2Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY, 3Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS, 4Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE.

P-068  Characterization of Salmonella Isolates from Retail Foods for Biofilm Formation, Inducible Acid-Tolerance and Caco-2 Cell Infectivity.

X. Xia1,2, A. Smith2, S. Zhao3, J. McEvoy2, J. Meng1, A. A. Bhagwat2;
1Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD, 2USDA/ARS, Beltsville, MD, 3US FDA, Laurel, MD.

P-069  Antimicrobial Resistant E. coli from Retail Chicken Breast and Slaughter Rinsates: NARMS 2002-2005.

P. McDermott1, N. Anandaraman2, J. Haro3, T. Ball3, E. Hall-Robinson1, K. Blickenstaff1, P. Carter1, P. Fedorka-Cray3;
1US FDA, Laurel, MD, 2US FDA, Washington, DC, 3USDA, Athens, GA.

P-070  The Microbiological Quality of Ready to use Fresh Salad in Vienna area.

M. Manafi;
Hygiene Inst., Vienna, AUSTRIA.

P-071  Prevalence of Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in Frozen Minced Beef in France.

C. Mazuy-Cruchaudet1, C. Bavai1, M. Poirel1, C. Taillandier1, L. Giuliani2, C. Vernozy-Rozand1;
1ENVL, Marcy l'Etoile, FRANCE, 2DGA, Paris, FRANCE.

P-072  Optimization of Raw Milk and Raw Milk Products Enrichment Step before E. coli O26 Detection.

D. Thevenot, M. Bouvier, A. Gleizal, C. Vernozy-Rozand;
Ecole Natl. Vét. de Lyon, Marcy l'Etoile, FRANCE.

P-073  Development of a New Lysis Method and Background Reduction Technology for Rapid Detection of Yeast and Mold.

M. Pressel, S. Rouillon, M. Hohnadel, F. Olivieri, B. Engel, P. Guedon, S. Ribault;
MILLIPORE, Molsheim, FRANCE.

 

181/Q. Indicators of Fecal Pollution - I

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

Q-249  Increasing the Precision and Accuracy of a Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) Method for Detection and Enumeration of Enterococci from Coastal Waters Utilizing an Internal Control (IC) RNA Molecule.

L. Poorvin1, S. S. Patterson1, M. L. Eldridge1, G. S. Sayler1, J. H. Paul2;
1Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL.

Q-250  Impact of Enrichment on the Recovery of Enteric Bacteria from Sediment Samples Collected from the North River.

A. K. Graves, L. Liwimbi, D. Lindbo, B. Robinson, R. Coburn, C. Cahoon, D. Vaal, J. Lubbers;
North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC.

Q-251  Evaluation of a Real-Time Quantitative PCR Method with Propidium Monoazide Treatment for Analyses of Viable Fecal Indicator Bacteria in Wastewater Samples.

M. Varma1, R. Field2, M. Stinson2, B. Rukovets3, E. Chern1, L. Wymer1, R. Haugland1;
1US EPA, Cincinnati, OH, 2USEPA, Edison, NJ, 3Interstate Environmental Commission, New York, NY.

Q-252  Comparison of Bacterial Endotoxin Concentration (LPS) and Heterotrophic Plate Count for Microbial Quality of Commercial Bottled Water.

E. L. Negron-Martinez, J. Norat Ramirez, J. Paredes Araud;
Univ. of Puerto Rico-Med. Sci. Campus, San Juan, PR.

Q-253  Assessment of False Positive and False Negative Confirmation Rates for Methods 1680 and 1681 in Biosolid Matrices.

Y. T. Chambers1, R. K. Oshiro2, D. Gibbons1, M. A. Smith1, K. M. Miller1, M. L. Pope1;
1CSC, Alexandria, VA, 2US EPA, Washington, DC.

Q-254  Significant Cross-Amplification of Fish Fecal DNA Using Quantitative Real-Time PCR Specific to the Human Bacteroides 16S rRNA Genetic Marker.

L. Kabiri-Badr1, H. Ryu1, J. McLain2, C. Rock3, A. Alum1, M. Abbaszadegan1;
1Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ, 2USDA/ARS, USALARC, Maricopa, AZ, 3Univ. of Arizona, Maricopa, AZ.

Q-255  Rapid Quantitative PCR Method for Quantification of Bacteroides as an Alternative Indicator of Fecal Contamination.

A. D. Blackwood, R. T. Noble;
Univ. of North Carolina, Morehead City, NC.

Q-256  Microbial Source Tracking of Fecal Contamination in Southwest Missouri Streams Using Bacteroides PCR and qPCR Methodology.

J. G. Steiert, N. J. Vanasch;
Missouri State Univ., Springfield, MO.

Q-257  Survival and Persistence of Human- and Ruminant-Specific Fecal Bacteroidales in Freshwater Microcosms.

S. P. Walters1, K. G. Field2;
1Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA, 2Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR.

Q-258  Bacteroidales PCR Source Tracking - Challenges and Considerations.

J. A. Truesdale, N. F. Garcia, E. A. Casarez, G. D. Di Giovanni;
Texas AgriLife Research, Texas A&M Univ., El Paso, TX.

Q-259  Analysis of Enterococci and Bacteroidales Fecal Indicator Bacteria in a Lake Michigan Tributary by Real-Time Quantitative PCR.

E. C. Chern1, M. Varma1, D. Shively2, M. Byappanahalli2, R. Whitman2, R. Zepp3, R. Haugland1;
1US EPA, Cincinnati, OH, 2USGS, Porter, IN, 3US EPA, Athens, GA.

Q-260  Novel PCR Assays Based on Bacteroidales 16S Ribosomal RNA Genes for Faecal Source Identification in Water.

S. Dorai-Raj, E. Colleran;
Natl. Univ. of Ireland, Galway, IRELAND.

Q-261  Enumeration and Differentiation of Bacteroides Isolates using a Dual-Probe, Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) Coupled with Melt Analysis.

R. A. Reinke;
Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County, Whittier, CA.

Q-262  Evaluation of a Quantitative Test for Hydrogen Sulfide Producing Bacteria to Predict Drinking Water Quality.

L. McMahan, C. E. Stauber, M. D. Sobsey;
Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.

Q-263  QPCR Quantification and Rep-PCR Characterization of Clostridium perfringens Populations in Composted Biosolids.

E. Karpowicz1, A. Novinscak1, F. Baerlocher2, M. Filion1;
1Univ. de Moncton, Moncton, NB, CANADA, 2Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, NB, CANADA.

Q-264  Development and Validation of a Sensitive Taqman Real Time PCR Assay for the Quantification of Two Human Polyomaviruses (JCV and BKV) in Human-Associated Waste Samples.

S. McQuaig1, T. Scott2, J. Lukasik2, V. Harwood1;
1Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL, 2Biological Consulting Services of North Florida, Gainesville, FL.

Q-265  The Correlation between Enteric Viruses and Male-Specific RNA Coliphages in the Well Water.

S. F. Y. Yong1, J. J. Tee1, S. P. Lau1, Y. F. Ngeow2;
1Monash Univ., Bandar Sunway, MALAYSIA, 2Natl. Pub. Hlth. Lab. Sungai Buluh, Selangor, MALAYSIA.

Q-266  Viruses Found in Sewage and Their Potential to Indicate Fecal Pollution in Coastal Waters.

E. M. Symonds, K. Rosario, M. Breitbart;
Univ. of South Florida, Saint Petersburg, FL.

Q-267  The Successful Recovery of Phages from Sewage in Tropical Hawaii Using a Newly Isolated Bacteroides Strain.

V. Kannappan1, R. Fujioka1, J. Ebdon2, H. Taylor2;
1Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 2Univ. of Brighton, Brighton, UNITED KINGDOM.

 

182/Q. Disinfection and Sterilization - I

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

Q-268  Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) Decontamination of a New BSL-3 Laboratory.

E. N. Ahanotu, T. Hewitt, A. Mosley, M. Henenin-Azer, T. Ravita;
SRA International Inc. (Constella Hlth. Sci.), Stone Mountain, GA.

Q-269  Surface Sampling Based Decontamination Assessment of Military-Relevant Materials with Vaporous Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP®) and Liquid Disinfectants.

L. Wallace1, V. K. Rastogi1, L. S. Smith1, J. W. Pfarr1, L. S. Sobota2, B. Davis3, A. Prugh4, J. S. Sabol5;
1US Army, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 2Naval Surface Warfare Ctr., Dahlgren, VA, 3US Army, Dugway Proving Ground, UT, 4Science & Technology Corp., Edgewood, MD, 5SAIC Corp., Abingdon, MD.

Q-270  Evaluation of Commercial Technologies for Bio-Decontamination of Personnel Protective Equipment-Relevant Surfaces.

L. S. Smith, L. Wallace, S. S. Shah, V. K. Rastogi;
US Army, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

Q-271  The Susceptibility of Bacillus atrophaeus Spores to Chemical Inactivation Is Dependent upon the Method of Spore Preparation.

C. A. Zapka1, A. S. Yandell2, D. R. Macinga1;
1GOJO Industries, Inc., Akron, OH, 2Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO.

Q-272  Evaluation of Spray-Applied Sporicidal Decontamination Technologies against Bacillus anthracis and Surrogate Spores on Indoor Surfaces.

J. Rogers1, W. Richter1, Y. Choi1, A. Shesky1, M. Taylor1, J. Wood2;
1Battelle Mem. Inst., Columbus, OH, 2US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

Q-273  Novel Gel Decontamination Technology Efficacy against Dried Bacillus anthracis Spores on Non-Porous Surfaces.

Y. W. Choi, W. R. Richter, A. K. Judd, J. V. Rogers;
Battelle Mem. Inst., Columbus, OH.

Q-274  Evaluation of Methyl Bromide Fumigation for Decontaminating Bacillus anthracis Spore-Inoculated Indoor Surfaces.

W. R. Richter1, M. Q. Shaw2, J. V. Rogers1, H. J. Stone1, S. P. Ryan3;
1Battelle Mem. Inst., Columbus, OH, 2Mem. Inst., Columbus, OH, 3US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.

Q-275  Determining Inactivation Rates of Viruses on Fomites.

J. B. Henley, C. P. Gerba;
Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

Q-276  Mechanisms of Viricidal Action of the Polyhexamethylene Biguanides (PHMB).

F. Pinto1, J. Maillard1, S. Denyer1, P. McGeechan2;
1Cardiff Univ., Cardiff, UNITED KINGDOM, 2ArchChemicals, Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM.

Q-277  Inactivation of Surrogate Coronaviruses on Hard Surfaces by Healthcare Disinfectants.

R. L. Hulkower, L. M. Casanova, W. A. Rutala, D. J. Weber, M. D. Sobsey;
Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.

Q-278  Antimicrobial Properties of a Recently Patented Formulation.

N. Rocco1, R. Wheeler1, C. Esiobu2, N. Esiobu2, J. A. Rosenzweig1;
1Nova Southeastern Univ., Ft. Lauderdale, FL, 2Florida Atlantic Univ., Davie, FL.

Q-279  The Effect of Antimicrobial Hand Washes on Methicillin Resistant Staphylococus aureus .

A. L. Waggoner, G. A. Cole, M. H. Duran, J. L. Fuls, A. B. Petrangeli, N. D. Rodgers, G. E. Fischler;
The Dial Corp., Scottsdale, AZ.

Q-280  Determining the Ability of Surface Wipes to Remove, Kill and Prevent the Transfer of Staphylococcus aureus from Contaminated Surfaces.

G. J. Williams1, S. P. Denyer1, I. K. Hosein2, D. W. Hill2, J-Y. Maillard1;
1Cardiff Univ., Cardiff, UNITED KINGDOM, 2Univ. Hosp. of Wales, Cardiff, UNITED KINGDOM.

Q-281  Optimal Growth Conditions and Viability of Mycobacterium bovis (BCG) for the Performance Evaluation for Disinfectants with Tuberculocidal Claims.

J. A. Hasan, M. J. Duncan, S. F. Tomasino;
US EPA, Ft. Meade, MD.

Q-282  Bacterial Resistance within Endoscope Washer Disinfectors and their Survival Mechanisms.

D. J. H. Martin1, G. McDonnell2, S. P. Denyer1, J-Y. Maillard1;
1Cardiff Univ., Cardiff, UNITED KINGDOM, 2Steris Ltd, Basingstoke, UNITED KINGDOM.

Q-283  Novel Antimicrobial Formulations.

V. K. Sharma, P. K. Fu;
Naval Inst. for Dent. and Biomedical Res., Great Lakes, IL.

Q-284  A New Generation of Antimicrobial Material.

H. Chu;
Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

Q-285  Surveillance of Susceptibility Profile to Antiseptics in ITU Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, including MRSA.

K. E. Cheeseman1, J-Y. Maillard1, G. J. Williams1, S. P. Denyer1, I. K. Hosein2;
1Cardiff Univ., Cardiff, UNITED KINGDOM, 2Univ. Hosp. of Wales, Cardiff, UNITED KINGDOM.

Q-286  Determination of Biological Parameters for Critical Devices Exposed to Ethylene Oxide Sterilization Processes.

S. L. Nogaroto1, F. N. Dias2, M. Ishii2, B. Piccini2, T. C. V. Penna2;
1Nipro Med. Ltda, Sorocaba, BRAZIL, 2Fac. Ciencias Farmaceuticas-Univ. São Paulo, São Paulo, BRAZIL.

Q-287  Evaluation of Autoclave Performance over Parenteral Solutions Thermal Processing.

M. Ishii1, F. S. Romano2, I. A. Machoshvili1, T. C. Vessoni Penna1;
1Univ. of São Paulo, São Paulo, BRAZIL, 2Aster Med. Products, Sorocaba, BRAZIL.

Q-288  Parametric Release of Large Volume Parenteral Solution (LVPS) Through Accumulated Lethality (F-value) Associated to Biological indicator (BI) Lethality.

T. C. V. Penna1, M. Ishii1, F. N. Dias2, F. Santiago3, S. Nogaroto4;
1Fac. CiOncias FarmacOuticas-Univ. São Paulo, São Paulo, BRAZIL, 2Fac. Ciências Farmacêuticas-Univ. São Paulo, São Paulo, BRAZIL, 3Aster Produtos Médicos Hospitalares, Sorocaba, São Paulo, BRAZIL, 4Nipro Med., Srocaba, São Paulo, BRAZIL.

Q-289  Effect of Parenteral Solution Composition and Package on the Thermal Resistance of Spores of Bacillus atrophaeus.

S. L. Nogaroto1, C. V. Montoya1, F. N. Dias2, M. Ishii2, T. Penna2;
1Nipro Med. Ltda, Sorocaba, São Paulo, BRAZIL, 2Fac. de Ciências Farmacêuticas-Univ. São Paulo, São Paulo, BRAZIL.

 

183/Q. General Environmental Microbiology - I

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

Q-290  Identification and Analysis of Genes Involved in Anaerobic Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation.

S. R. Taft1, K. A. Weber2, J. D. Coates3, L. A. Achenbach1;
1Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL, 2Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 3Univ. of California Sch. of Med., Berkeley, CA.

Q-291  Coupling Microbial Oxidation of FE(II) to Photooxidation of Natural Organic Matter as a Straregy for Growth by Rhodobacter capsulatus SB1003.

A. J. Poulain, D. K. Newman;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

Q-292  Roles of OmcB and OmcE from Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 in Iron (III) and Manganese (IV) Reduction.

J. Chen1, H. Gao1,2, Y. Liang1,3, Z. He1, J. Zhou1;
1Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 2Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI, 3Central South Univ., Changsha, CHINA.

Q-293  Aggregation of Clay-Bacteria-Exopolysaccharide (EPS) in Electrohydrodynamically-Defined Suspensions of Shewanella spp.

J. R. Dale, Y. Furukawa;
Naval Res. Lab., Stennis Space Center, MS.

Q-294  Electrode-Based Approaches for Monitoring the in Situ Activity of Geobacter species during Bioremediation of Uranium-Contaminated Groundwater.

K. H. Williams1,2, A. Franks3, K. P. Nevin3, M. J. Wilkins1, H. Elifantz3, P. J. Mouser3, L. N'Guessan3, P. E. Long4, D. R. Lovley3;
1Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 2Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA, 3Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 4Pacific Northwest Natl. Lab., Richland, WA.

Q-295  Geobacter Gets a Sweet Tooth: Awakening Latent Metabolic Pathways via Adaptive Evolution.

Z. M. Summers, S. A. Haveman, M. Izallalen, D. R. Lovley;
Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

Q-296  Complete Genome Sequence and Genome-Based In Silico Metabolic Model of Rhodoferax ferrireducens.

C. Risso1, B. Methé2, J. Sun3, R. Deboy2, D. R. Lovley1;
1Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 2J. Craig Venter Inst., Rockville, MD, 3Genomatica Inc, San Diego, CA.

Q-297  Characterization of Pyruvate Fermentation by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Their Cytochrome c3 Mutants.

B. J. Giles, H-C. B. Yen, J. D. Wall;
Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO.

Q-298  Complementation with and without Hypothetical Protein DVU0851 in a qmoABC, hypothetical protein (DVU0851) Deletion Mutant of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

G. M. Zane1,2, H-C. B. Yen1,2, J. D. Wall1,2;
1Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 2VIMSS (Virtual Inst. of Microbial Stress and Survival), Berkeley, CA.

Q-299  Global Transcriptional and Metabolite Analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Responses to Long-Term Exposure to Elevated NaCl.

Z. He1,2,3, E. Baidoo4,3,5, A. Zhou1,3, Q. He6,2,3, P. Benke4,3, R. Phan4,3, M. Joachimiak4,3, M. W. Fields7,2,3, A. Mukhopadhyay4,3, E. J. Alm4,3, K. Huang4,3, J. D. Wall8,3, T. C. Hazen4,3, J. D. Keasling4,3,5, A. P. Arkin4,3, J. Zhou1,2,3;
1The Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 2Oak Ridge Natl. Lab., Oak Ridge, TN, 3Virtual Inst. for Microbial Stress and Survival, Berkeley, CA, 4Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA, 5Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 6The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 7Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT, 8Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO.

Q-300  Impact of Growth Phase and Copper Toxicity on Elemental Composition of Nitrosomonas europaea.

R. Yu1, B. Lai2, S. Vogt2, I. Noyan1, K. Chandran1;
1Columbia Univ., New York, NY, 2Advanced Photon Source, Argonne Natl. Lab., Argonne, IL.

Q-301  Strategies for Living with High Concentrations of Copper; Kinetics and Equilibrium of Copper Sequestration by Ralstonia pickettii.

F. Yang, S-H. Kim, M. Fujimoto, T. L. Marsh;
Ctr. for Microbial Ecology, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

Q-302  Characterization of a Class I Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthase Isolated from its Native Organism, Ralstonia eutropha .

C. J. Brigham, J. Stubbe, A. J. Sinskey;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

Q-303  Influences of Erythromycin and Erythromycin-H2O on Aerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR).

C. Fan, J. He;
Natl. Univ. of Singapore, Singapore, SINGAPORE.

Q-304  Adaptation of Non-Archaeal Prokaryotic Rumen Populations when Monensin Is Used to Reduce Methane Emissions.

J. J. Bouchard, K. M. Wittenberg, K. H. Ominski, D. O. Krause;
Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CANADA.

Q-305  Phenotype Microarray Comparisons of Bacillus subtilis 168 and FBC5 Mutant Impaired in Calcium Carbonate Precipitation.

M. Marvasi1, M. Zurita2, P. Visscher3, G. Mastromei1, B. Perito1, L. Casillas-Martinez2;
1Univ. of Florence, Florence, ITALY, 2Univ. of Puerto Rico, Humacao, PR, 3Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

Q-306  Inhibitory Activity of Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia), a Phytochemical Rich Forage and Pure Phenolic Compounds on Escherichia coli.

N. C. Berard1, R. A. Holley1, K. H. Ominski1, T. A. McAllister2, K. M. Wittenberg1, D. O. Krause1;
1Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, CANADA, 2Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB, CANADA.

Q-307  Response of the Proteobacteria Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 and Rhodospirillum rubrum S1H to Space Flight Conditions.

N. Leys1, F. Mastroleo1, R. Wattiez2, L. Hendrickx1, S. Baatout1, M. A. Benotmane1, M. F. Mergeay1;
1SCK/CEN Belgian Nuclear Energy Ctr., Mol, BELGIUM, 2Univ. Mons-Hainaut, Mons, BELGIUM.

Q-308  Simulated Microgravity Alters Global Gene Expression and Protein Secretion by Staphylococcus aureus.

H. Rosado1, M. Doyle1, J. Hinds2, P. W. Taylor1;
1Sch. of Pharmacy, London, UNITED KINGDOM, 2St. George's Hosp. Med. Sch., London, UNITED KINGDOM.

Q-309  Assessing the Effect of Ionic Liquids on Microbial Growth: New Concerns for Environmental Safety.

C. McEntee1,2, P. Bisangwa1, M. Sahin2, X. Li3, J. Gwon3, J. Wishart4, S. Lall-Ramnarine3;
1Kingsborough Community Coll., Brooklyn, NY, 2Brooklyn Coll., Brooklyn, NY, 3Queensborough Community Coll., Queens, NY, 4Brookhaven Natl. Lab., Brookhaven, NY.

Q-310  Variability in UVB Tolerances of Melanized and Nonmelanized Cells of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus laurentii.

L. A. Schiave1, R. S. Pedroso1, R. C. Candido1, D. W. Roberts2, G. U. L. Braga1;
1Univ. de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, BRAZIL, 2Utah State Univ., Logan, UT.

Q-311  Toxicity Assessment of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain 4L1 Subjected at Exposure to Ultraviolet Radiation.

O. M. Rutiaga_Quiñones1, M. A. Rodríguez_Pérez2, C. Lizarazo_Ortega2, J. M. Gonzalez_Prieto2, G. C. Rodriguez_Castillejos2, E. J. De Luna_Santillana2;
1Inst. Tecnologico de Durango, Durango, MEXICO, 2Ctr. de Biotecnologia Genomica, Inst. Politécnico Nacional, Reynosa Tamaulipas, MEXICO.

Q-312  A Study on Fractal Morphogenesis in Bacteria as an Adaptive Response to Environmental Stress.

H. E. Woriax, M. E. Santos;
Univ. of North Carolina, Pembroke, NC.

Q-313  Toxicity Assessment of Contaminants via Gene Expression Profiling in E. coli.

A. Onnis-Hayden, G. Casadei, P. J. Beuning, K. Lewis, A. Gu;
Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA.

Q-314  Studying the Association of Malachite Green and Anti-Malachite Green Aptamers.

X. Zhang1, A. Potty1, G. Jackson2, V. Stepanov1, Y. Liu1, U. Strych1, G. Fox1, R. Willson1;
1Univ. of Houston, Houston, TX, 2BioTex Inc., Houston, TX.

Q-315  Effects of Transient loading on the Removability of Benzene and Toluene in a Polyurethane Biofilter.

E-H. Lee, K-S. Cho;
Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul, REPUBLIC OF KOREA.

Q-316  Sagebrush Rhizobacterium as Biological Control of Plant Pathogenic Fusarium Species Isolated from Contaminated Pepper Fields of Chihuahua, Mexico.

J. Hernandez-Huerta, G. Nevarez-Portillo, L. Robles-Hernández, A. C. Gonzalez-Franco;
Univ. Autonoma de Chihuahua, Chihuahua, MEXICO.

Q-317  The Effects of Dairy Age on Antimicrobial Agent Susceptibility in E. coli from Dairy Farm Topsoil.

S. E. Jones, Y. Peng, R. L. Hernandez, J. M. Burgos, M. F. F. Lutnesky, M. F. Varela;
Eastern New Mexico Univ., Portales, NM.

Q-318  Field Plot Studies of Survival and Growth of the Biocontrol Agent Bacillus Strain 1BA Applied To Wheat Heads.

B. H. Bleakley, J. Morgan;
South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD.

 

184/R. Mechanisms of Microbial/Molecular Evolution

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

R-038  Recommendations for a Revised System of Nomenclature for Allelic Variants of Intimin (eae).

D. Lacher1, H. Steinsland2,3, T. Whittam2;
1US FDA, Laurel, MD, 2Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI, 3Univ. of Bergen, Bergen, NORWAY.

R-039  A Cluster Analysis of Lipid Component Parts and Selection of Its Combinations Unique to Each Taxon in Archaea.

Y. Koga, M. Nakano;
Univ. of Occupational and Environmental Hlth., Kitakyushu, JAPAN.

R-040  IS-Mediated Genome Rearrangement and Adaptation in Experimental Populations of Methylobacterium.

M-C. Lee, C. J. Marx;
Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA.

R-041  Excision and Integration Dynamics of Vibrio Pathogenicity Island-2 (VPI-2) from Vibrio cholerae.

S. Almagro-Moreno, E. F. Boyd;
Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE.

R-042  Using Solexa Sequencing to Identify Adaptive Mutations in Methylobacterium.

N. Delaney, M-C. Lee, D. Chou, C. Marx;
Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA.

R-043  Long-Term Effect of Ultraviolet Radiation Induced Mutagenic DNA Repair on Relative Fitness and Phenotypic Diversification in Pseudomonas cichorii 302959.

M. R. Weigand, G. W. Sundin;
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

R-044  Experimental Adaptation of Burkholderia Cnocepacia to a Novel Host Reduces Host Range.

C. N. Ellis, V. S. Cooper;
Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH.

R-045  Experimental Evolution of Burkholderia cenocepacia Planktonic and Biofilm Populations: Identifying the Effects of Niche Selection.

S. R. Poltak, V. S. Cooper;
Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH.

R-046  Plasmid Diversity Is High in E. coli and Salmonella and Limited in Marine Symbiotic Vibrio.

L. E. Williams, J. Kramer, D. Adin, E. Stabb, A. O. Summers;
Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

R-047  Amerindian Helicobacter pylori strains Go Extinct, as European Strains Expand their Host Range.

M. G. Dominguez-Bello1, M. E. Pérez1, M. C. Bortolini2, F. M. Salzano2, L. R. Pericchi1, O. Zambrano-Guzmán3, B. Linz4;
1Univ. of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR, 2Univ. Federal Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, BRAZIL, 3Univ. Pedagogica Experimental Libertador, Puerto Ayacucho, VENEZUELA, 4Max-Planck Inst. für Infektionsbiologie, Berlin, GERMANY.

R-048  Estimation of Bounds of Gene Flow by Homologous Recombination among Coastal Vibrio Isolates.

D. Gevers, S. P. Preheim, Y. Boucher, M. F. Polz;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

R-049  Evolutionary History of the Salmonella Flagellin Loci, fliC and fljB.

J. R. McQuiston1, P. I. Fields1, R. V. Tauxe1, J. M. Logsdon2;
1CDC, Atlanta, GA, 2Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.

R-050  Amplification of a Genetic Segment Containing a Citrate Transporter Gene Underlies Evolution of Aerobic Citrate Utilization in a Long-Term Experimental Population of Escherichia coli.

Z. D. Blount1, J. E. Barrick1, S. C. Sleight1,2, R. E. Lenski1;
1Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI, 2Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA.

R-051  Design and Development of a Novel High Density Microarray Representative of over 75 Complete Genome Sequences of Salmonella and Escherichia coli: Identifying Genes and SNPs.

S. A. Jackson, M. Mammel, I. Patel, J. E. LeClerc, T. A. Cebula;
US FDA, Laurel, MD.

R-052  Dynamics of the Integron-Associated Mobile Gene Cassette Pool of a Natural Vibrio cholerae Population.

Y. Boucher1, D. E. Hunt2, M. Labbate3, H. W. Stokes3, M. F. Polz1;
1Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, 3Macquarie Univ., Sydney, AUSTRALIA.

R-053  “Pan-Genomes” and the Microbial Species/Strain Boundary: How Close is “Close”?

J. H. Badger1, R. T. DeBoy1, D. R. Lovley2, B. A. Methé1;
1J. Craig Venter Inst., Rockville, MD, 2Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

R-054  Use of a Genotyping DNA Microarray Representing Diverse Pathotypes of E.coli and Shigella sp for Strain Identification and Discrimination Between and Within Closely Related Species.

S. A. Jackson, I. Patel, M. K. Mammel, T. Mays, J. E. LeClerc, T. A. Cebula;
US FDA, Laurel, MD.

R-055  High Nutrient Levels and Spatial Structure Mediate Invasion of IncP-1 Plasmids in Bacterial Populations.

R. E. Fox, X. Zhong, S. M. Krone, E. M. Top;
Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID.

R-056  The Dynamics and Genetic Adaptation to Salt Stress in Long-Term Experimental Evolution of Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough.

A. Zhou1,2, Z. He1,2, M. P. Joachimiak3,2, P. S. Dehal3,2, A. P. Arkin3,2, K. Hillesland4,2, D. Stahl4,2, J. D. Wall5,2, T. C. Hazen3,2, J. Zhou1,2;
1Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, 2Virtual Inst. for Microbial Stress and Survival, Berkeley, CA, 3Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA, 4Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA, 5Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO.

R-057  Contribution of Transposase to RecA-Dependent Gene Duplication.

A. Reams, J. Roth;
Univ. of California, Davis, CA.

R-058  Evolution of the Emerging Vibrio cholerae Serogroup O75 and its Relationship to Vibrio cholerae O1 Classical Biotype.

C. L. Tarr, M. B. Parsons, M. Miller, K. Greene, C. A. Bopp;
CDC, Atlanta, GA.

R-059  The Distribution of Beneficial Mutations and their Pleiotropic Effects.

S. G. Comeau, V. S. Cooper;
Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH.

R-060  Population Structure and Recombination in Listeria monocytogenes .

H. C. den Bakker1, X. Didelot2, E. Fortes1, K. Nightingale3, R. H. Orsi1, M. Wiedmann1;
1Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY, 2Univ. of Warwick, Coventry, UNITED KINGDOM, 3Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO.

R-061  Biogeography of Sulfolobus islandicus Viruses.

N. Held, R. Whitaker;
Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL.

R-062  Matrix Production Is Driven by Both Conflict and Cooperation within Biofilms.

W. Kim1,2, K. R. Foster2, S. B. Levy1;
1Tufts Univ., Boston, MA, 2Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA.

R-063  Quorum-Controlled Lantibiotics Enforce Cooperative Behavior within Bacillus subtilis Populations.

D. N. Adamson1, D. M. Wolf2, A. Arkin1,2;
1Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA, 2Lawrence Berkeley Natl. Lab., Berkeley, CA.

 

185/Y. Molecular Epidemiology

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Poster Hall

Y-016  Epidemiology Investigation of Salmonella in the State of Sinaloa, Mexico.

L. Simental1,2, J. H. Monjardin Herarldez1,3, J. Ansede-Bermejo2, V. Blanco-Abad2, S. Beltran Fernandez1, P. Carrillo-Duarte1,3, A. Canizalez-Roman1,3, J. Martinez-Urtaza2;
1Lab. Estatal de Salud Pública de Sinaloa, Culiacán Sinaloa, MEXICO, 2Univ. de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, SPAIN, 3Univ. Autónoma de Sinaloa, Facultad de Medicina, Culiacán, Sinaloa, MEXICO.

Y-017  Predicting Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotypes by Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic Sequence-Based PCR.

B. S. Seal1, M. G. Wise2, G. R. Siragusa1, J. Plumblee1, P. F. Cray1, E. H. Atkins2, T. A. Ross2, M. Healy2;
1USDA/ARS, Athens, GA, 2Bacterial Barcodes, Athens, GA.

Y-018  An Epidemiological Investigation on the Distribution of Drug-Resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Javiana Outbreaks in Arkansas.

J. Deck1, R. Nayak1, R. Stefanova2;
1Natl. Ctr. for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR, 2Arkansas Pub. Hlth. Lab., Little Rock, AR.

Y-019  Association of Multiple-Locus VNTR Clusters and Phage Type Lineages among Salmonella Enteritidis Isolates from Sporadic Human Cases in the United States.

S. Cho1, T. S. Whittam1, D. J. Boxrud2, J. M. Bartkus2, S. C. Rankin3, M. J. Wilkins4, P. Somsel4, F. P. Downes4, L. D. Warnick5, M. Wiedmann5, A. M. Saeed1;
1Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI, 2Minnesota Dept. of Hlth., St. Paul, MN, 3Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 4Michigan Dept. of Community Hlth., Lansing, MI, 5Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

Y-020  Antimicrobial Resistance and Genetic Relatedness among Salmonella Schwarzengrund from Slaughtering Broiler and Human.
Y-C. Wang1, K-S. Yeh2, Y-C. Chang3,1, T-H. Chen4;
1Natl. Chung Hsing Univ., Taichung, TAIWAN, 2Taipei Med. Univ., Taipei, TAIWAN, 3China Med. Univ., Taichung, TAIWAN, 4The Graduate Inst. of Vet. Pub. Hlth., Natl. Chung Hsing Univ., Taichung, TAIWAN.

Y-021  Detection and Characterization of eae Variants Found in STEC Positive Stool Samples.

P. A. Michel, J. Kase;
North Carolina State Lab of Pub. Hlth., Raleigh, NC.

Y-022  Analysis of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factor Genotypes and Intestinal Parasites in Fecal Specimens of Healthy Subjects.

T. Sasaki1, R. Izurieta2,3, B. H. Kwa2, F. Valles2, E. Estevez3, E. Velasco3, F. Barrera4, A. Saldana5, J. Calzada5, M. Utsumi1, S. Fujimoto1, A. Kimoto1, Y. Fukuda1, I. Hirai1, Y. Yamamoto1;
1Osaka Univ. Graduate Sch. of Med., Osaka, JAPAN, 2Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL, 3Central Univ. of Ecuador, Quito, ECUADOR, 4MoPH, Quito, ECUADOR, 5ICGES, Panama, PANAMA.

Y-023  Haemophilus influenzae Carriage in Healthy Children and Adults in Vietnam.

N. D. Phillips, C. A. Talarico, C. F. Marrs, J. R. Gilsdorf;
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Y-024  Phylogenetic Evidence for Possible Reverse Zoonosis and Species-Specific Strains of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Domestic Animals.

M. A. Jensen, C. L. Smith, S. Sanchez;
Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

Y-025  Implementation of a Novel PFGE Protocol for Group B Streptococcus Surveillance: A Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Case Study.

A. M. Woron, J. K. MacFarquhar, J. P. Dill, M. Lehman, J. A. Gibson;
Tennessee Dept. of Hlth., Nashville, TN.

Y-026  Epidemics of Gastroenteritis by Norovirus GII.4 Variants in Australia and New Zealand, 2006-2007.

E. T. Tu1,2, R. A. Bull1,2, G. E. Greening3, J. Hewitt3, M. J. Lyon4, J. A. Marshall5, J-S. Eden1, D. Smith6, C. J. McIver1,2, W. D. Rawlinson1,2, P. A. White1;
1Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney, AUSTRALIA, 2Prince of Wales Hosp., Sydney, AUSTRALIA, 3Inst. of Environmental Sci. and Res. Ltd., Porirua, NEW ZEALAND, 4Queensland Hlth. Sci. Services, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA, 5Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Lab., Victoria, AUSTRALIA, 6QEII Med. Ctr., Perth, AUSTRALIA.

Y-027  Molecular Epidemiology of Noroviruses in Singapore, 2006-2007.

L. L. E. Oon, E. X. Q. Chen;
Singapore General Hosp., Singapore, SINGAPORE.

Y-028  Identification of Genogroup C Rhinoviruses in California Based on the Analysis of the 5' Noncoding Region.

D. Kiang1, S. Yagi1, J. Louie1, H. Boushey2, D. Schnurr1;
1California Dept. of Pub. Hlth. (CDPH), Richmond, CA, 2Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA.

Colloquium

186. Symbiotic Microbial Interactions with Invertebrates
and Other Microbes 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

258 A

Convener:

J. R. Leadbetter;
California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Endomicrobia and Elusimicrobia: Intracellular Symbionts of Termite Gut Flagellates, and the First Isolate of the TG-1 Ph.

A. Brune;
MPI for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg, GERMANY.

3:00 pm A Symbiosis Factor of Human Commensal Bacteria Mediates Protection From Inflammatory Disease.

S. K. Mazmanian;
California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

3:30 pm Invasion and Matricide During Photorhabdus Symbiont Transmission in Nematodes.

T. A. Ciche;
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

4:00 pm Symbiotic Colonization of Squid By Vibrio Fischeri: Bacterial Regulators, Targets and Phenotypes.

K. Visick;
Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL.

Of the diversity of microbes that interact with animals, many more of them form stable, persistent, and long-term associations than cause an obvious disease. The study of beneficial and symbiotic microbes has expanded greatly in recent years, as has our appreciation for the keen impacts these organisms have on their animal hosts. The speakers of this colloquium are leaders in this field, and will highlight 4 distinct animal-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions that have proven fertile for discovery in recent years. Specifically, novel insights into termites, humans, nematodes, and squid and their gut and light organ microbiota will be revealed. The study and isolation of bacteria representing a novel phylum will be described. The impact of microbes on host nutrition as well as immune system and organ development will be highlighted. Mechanisms controlling the transmission and successful infection of symbionts will be examined.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Summarize several major models of animal-microbe interactions and the rationale for their examination.

• Contrast modes of transmission of several beneficial microbes.

• Recognize the different impacts beneficial and symbiotic microbes can have on the nutrition and development of their host.

Colloquium

187. Pathogens and the Neutrophil 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

160 A

Convener:

V. Nizet;
Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Beneficial Suicide: Neutrophil Extracellular Traps.

A. Zychlinsky;
Max Planck Inst. for Infection Biology, Berlin, GERMANY.

3:00 pm Yersinia pestis Evasion of Neutrophil Killing.

S. Kobayashi;
Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID.

3:30 pm Applying Molecular Koch's Postulates to Understand Bacterial Resistance to Neutrophil Killing.

V. Nizet;
Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA.

4:00 pm Modulation of Neutrophil Apoptosis by Anaplasma.

Y. Rikihisa;
Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH.

4:30 pm Role of Neutrophils in Microbial Competition.

J. N. Weiser;
Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

A critical first line component of host innate immunity, neutrophils have been studied much less thoroughly than monocyte/macrophage cell types. The general effectiveness of these cells in host defense bespeaks specialized functions in directed migration, microbial uptake, and production of a variety of bactericidal effector molecules, many new aspects of which are being uncovered. Conversely, leading pathogens have evolved mechanisms to interfere with the neutrophil defenses, and the role of these in pathogenesis are being elucidated through molecular genetic analyses using in vitro and in vivo systems.

Colloquium  

188. Systems Microbiology: Metabolic Modeling and Biological Applications

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

210 B

Conveners:

B. Palsson;
Univ. of California, LaJolla, CA.

K. Sneppen;
Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DENMARK.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Models.

B. Palsson;
Univ. of California, LaJolla, CA.

3:00 pm Genetic Regulation of Iron Fluxes in E. coli.

K. Sneppen;
Univ. of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DENMARK.

3:30 pm Differential Network Responses to Drugs and Stress.

C. Forst;
Los Alamos Natl. Lab., Los Alamos, NM.

4:00 pm Modeling Metabolic Constraints Imposed by Host Nitric Oxide During Infection.

A. R. Richardson;
Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA.

4:30 pm Salmonella Metabolic Networks and Implications for Antimicrobial Drug Development.

D. Bumann;
Univ. of Basel, Basel, SWITZERLAND.

Systems microbiology analyzes microbes or microbial communities in a holistic fashion, combining informatic and biological data to create an integrated view. A systems approach has been especially powerful when applied to the analysis of complex metabolic networks. This session will emphasize recent work in modeling microbial metabolism and explore implications for understanding bacterial pathogenesis and developing novel antibiotics.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Appreciate how metabolic networks can be inferred from genomic data and experimentally validated.

• Define the metabolic constraints imposed by host innate immunity and an important mechanism of evasion utilized by Staphylococcus aureus.

• Recognize the implications of metabolic networks for efforts to discover novel antimicrobial targets.

Divisional Group Symposium  

189. Bacterial Gene Expression During Infection: Virulence and Metabolism 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

253 A

Conveners:

H. L. Mobley;
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

S. Lory;
Harvard Med. Sch.7, Boston,, MA.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Pseudomonas aeruginosa Metabolism in Respiratory Epithelium.

S. Lory;
Harvard Med. Sch., Boston,, MA.

3:00 pm In vivo Gene Expression in IBC's during Cystitis.

S. J. Hultgren;
Washington Univ. Sch. of Med., St. Louis, MO.

3:30 pm Metabolism of Bacillus anthracis During Infection of Host Macrophages.

P. C. Hanna;
Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch. Ann Arbor, MI.

4:00 pm Metabolically Active Mycobacterium tuberculosis During Chronic Lung Infection.

A. M. Talaat;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

4:30 pm Transcriptome of Group A Streptococcus in Soft Tissue Infection.

J. M. Musser;
Methodist Hosp. Res. Inst., Houston, TX.

Presentations will focus on gene expression by bacterial pathogens during an active infection. Previous emphasis has been placed on the synthesis of proteins that contribute directly to virulence including, for example, adhesins and toxins. It is now being appreciated that the ability to persist in a given niche within a host depends as much on the ability to establish an active metabolism as on the elaboration of traditional virulence determinants. Speakers will summarize their findings for representative pathogens.

Upon completion of this session, participant should be able to:

• Describe methods by which in vivo gene expression can be assessed.

• Discuss potentially novel therapeutic targets of antimicrobial therapy.

• List key metabolic pathways of representative bacterial pathogens.

Divisional Group Symposium

190. Estimating Microbial Diversity Using Genomic Data 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

205 A

Convener:

S. S. Epstein;
Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Microbial Inventory on Planetary Scale.

J. M. Tiedje;
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

3:00 pm The Long Record of Rare Biosphere.

M. L. Sogin;
Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA.

3:30 pm The Spectrum of Methods for Measuring Microbial Diversity.

J. A. Bunge;
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.

4:00 pm TBA.

J. Venter;
The J. Craig Venter Inst., Rockville, MD.

4:30 pm Everything May Indeed Be Everywhere.

S. S. Epstein;
Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA.

This session will critically review the state of the art in the study of microbial diversity. The attendees will hear about the most recent advances in using metagenomics and novel sequencing technologies to estimate the extent of microbial diversity on our planet. The speakers will analyze and contrast bioinformatics and statistical tools that, used in concert with genomic data, allow solid predictions of microbial richness at the local and global scale. The talks will present specific estimates of global microbial richness, and how these estimates change the views on organization of microbial communities and lead to new concepts in microbial biogeography. The attendees will witness how some of the long-standing questions in biodiversity research are being resolved, such as: is everything everywhere, and does the environment select?

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Relate microbial diversity and microbial ecology research.

• Analyze similarities and differences in patterns of distribution of micro- and macroorganisms.

• Critically assess and evaluate the tools used in microbial biodiversity research.

Interactive Symposium

191/C. Case Presentations in Clinical Microbiology

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Ballroom East

Conveners:

S. Whittier;
Columbia Univ. Med. Ctr., New York, NY.

J. M. Campos;
Children's Natl. Med. Ctr., Washington, DC.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Case 1 & 2.

M. K. York;
MK York Consulting, Walnut Creek, CA.

3:00 pm Case 3 & 4.

Speaker not available at press time.

3:30 pm Case 5 & 6.

R. B. Carey;
CDC, Atlanta, GA.

4:00 pm Case 7 & 8.

J. M. Campos;
Children's Natl. Med. Ctr., Washington, DC.

4:30 pm Case 9 &10.

S. Whittier;
Columbia Univ. Med. Ctr., New York, NY.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Implement improved processes for the identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of microorganisms.

• Select the most accurate and cost-effective tests to diagnose important infectious diseases.

• Educate their laboratory staff on improved means of reporting microbiology results.

Symposium  

192/D. The Yin and Yang of Host Responses to Bacterial Respiratory Tract Infections 

Co-Sponsored By: Division B

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

252 A

Conveners:

T. F. Murphy;
State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY.

D. E. Briles;
Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Chlamydia pneumoniae and Apoptosis: Life and Death Decisions of an Intracellular Pathogen.

G. Byrne;
Univ. of Tennessee Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Memphis, TN.

3:00 pm Mechanisms of Recurrent Bacterial Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Model of Microbial Evasion.

T. F. Murphy;
State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY.

3:30 pm Protective Immune Responses to Respiratory Tract Infection due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

G. B. Pier;
Harvard Med. Sch., Boston, MA.

4:00 pm Immune Regulation of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae by Human Alveolar Macrophages.

C. S. Berenson;
State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY.

4:30 pm Protective Host Responses to Noncapsular Surface Antigens of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

D. E. Briles;
Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL.

Bacterial infection of the respiratory tract account for enormous morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent studies of respiratory tract bacterial infection emphasize the host microbe interaction in understanding mechanisms of pathogenesis that result in detrimental outcomes. In addition, a fertile area of recent work in the area of vaccine development is being driven by understanding the elements of protective responses to bacteria. This symposium will include presentations that consider recent novel observations in understanding the balance between detrimental and protective host responses to five important bacterial pathogens that cause infection in children and adults.

Symposium  

193/E. 100 Years after the Nobel Prize to Paul Ehrlich and Elie Metchnikov: The Dualism Between Innate and Acquired Immunity 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

210 A

Conveners:

S. H. E. Kaufmann;
Max-Planck-Inst. for Infection Biology, Berlin, GERMANY.

J. U. Igietseme;
CDC/NCID, Atlanta, GA.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Innate Immunity 100 Years after the Nobel Prize to Elie Metchnikoff.

R. Medzhitov;
HHMI/Yale Univ. Sch. of Med., New Haven, CT.

3:00 pm Antibodies and B cells 100 Years after the Nobel Prize to Paul Ehrlich.

M. C. Nussenzweig;
Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY.

3:30 pm Immunologic Control of Infectious Agents 100 Years after the Nobel Prize to Elie Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich.

S. H. E. Kaufmann;
Max-Planck-Inst. for Infection Biology, Berlin, GERMANY.

4:00 pm Division E Lecture: Immunity 100 Years after the Nobel Prize to Elie Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich.

P. Marrack;
Natl. Jewish Med. and Res. Ctr., Denver, CO.

The colloquium is built up symmetrically. Two talks on innate and two on acquired immunity, one each on receptors and one on functions.
Innate immunity: Receptors include those which sense the pathogen and will describe the receptors and the signaling that initiate immune responses. These not only include the positive signaling pathways (e.g. TLR and NOD), but also negative pathways (e.g. DC-SIGN). Functions include phagocytosis and the relevant killer mechanisms as well as the mechanisms of antigen presention (cytokine secretion, processing and surface expression of costsimulatory molecules) and their role in infectious diseases.
Acquired immunity: The receptors include the T cell receptor and the antibodies as well as the specific immune cells, the T lymphocytes and the B lymphocytes how they see antigens and how they respond to the innate immune system (antigen presentation, cytokines, costimulatory molecules). Functions of the innate immune system include the secretion of different cytokines which activate other immune cells (macrophages, B cells etc.) and the different killer mechanisms and their role in infectious diseases.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• State the principles of the innate and the acquired immune responses.

Symposium

194/H. Bacterial Machines: Looking Under the Hood
and Throwing in a Wrench 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

156 A

Conveners:

A. C. Karls;
Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA.

W. Margolin;
Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Division H Lecture: Signaling and Replication in the Control of Horizontal Gene Transfer.

A. Grossman;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

3:00 pm DNA Repair Machines.

G. C. Walker;
Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

3:30 pm Splitsville: The Bacterial Cell Division Machine.

W. Margolin;
Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX.

4:00 pm Assembly and Positioning of Supramolecular Complexes in E. coli Chemotaxis.

V. Sourjik;
Univ. of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, GERMANY.

A great deal is known about bacterial genes and their regulation. Likewise, in the last decade there have been major advances in understanding where proteins are localized within cells. A full picture of a functioning cell requires that we understand how these proteins join together to make molecular machines, and how these machines interact with other machines and cellular structures. The protein components of machines involved in horizontal gene transfer, DNA repair, chemotaxis, and cell division are mostly known, but we are just beginning to learn how the components are assembled and directed to specific addresses within the cell. This symposium will summarize the state of the field and describe recent breakthroughs.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Compare the subcellular localization patterns of a number of molecular machines.

• Explain how multiple proteins assemble inside the bacterial cell to create functioning machines.

• Describe the interactions between protein machines and other cellular components, including the cytoplasmic membrane and the cytoskeleton.

Symposium  

195/K. Novel Respiratory Processes in Bacteria and Archaea: Metals, Minerals and Electrodes

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

157 A

Conveners:

J. A. Gralnick;
Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.

D. Bond;
Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Hyperthermophilic Archaea.

J. F. Holden;
Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA.

3:00 pm Beyond Nanowires: Novel Mechanisms of Electron Transfer in Geobacter Biofilms.

G. Reguera;
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI.

3:30 pm Microbial Biofilm Voltametry: New Insights from Direct Measurement of Electron Transfer to Surfaces.

D. R. Bond;
Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.

4:00 pm The Role of Small Molecules in Anaerobic Respiration of Shewanella.

J. A. Gralnick;
Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.

4:30 pm Respiratory Electron Transfer Across the Outer-Membrane - Are Hemes Important?

D. Richardson;
Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich, UNITED KINGDOM.

Microbes dominate and mediate nearly all geochemical transformations taking place on our planet. Microorganisms catalyzing these reactions provide a promising future in biotechnology for novel biocatalysis, bioremediation and bioenergy. Moreover, new work aimed at understanding how these processes work at the molecular level is providing insights into fundamental physiological processes of environmental microorganisms, and is setting the stage for future metabolic engineering towards these biotechnology goals. This is an important area of microbial physiology, which is now gaining attention from many fields. Speakers in this session will discuss respiratory metal transformation processes from two main bacterial model systems: Geobacter and Shewanella, in addition to the archeon Pyrobaculum.

Round Table

196/Q. Understanding Human Effects Upon Aquatic
Ecosystems - Can We Leave Smaller Footprints? 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

204 A

Convener:

C. J. Hurst;
Xavier Univ., Cincinnati, OH.

Presentations:

2:30 pm The Canos, Septic Rivers the Americas.

C. J. Hurst;
Xavier Univ., Cincinnati, OH.

2:45 pm Protecting the Fragile Coastal Ecosystems.

H. Solo-Gabriele;
Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.

3:00 pm Molecular Methods as Tools for Improved Management of Recreational Waters.

R. T. Noble;
The Univ. of North Carolina, Morehead City, NC.

3:15 pm Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago's Role in Protecting Public Health and Chicago Area Waterways.

G. K. Rijal;
Metro. Water Reclamation Dist. of Greater Chicago, Cicero, IL.

3:30 pm Sustainable Technologies for Effective Sewage Treatment Without Large Scale Infrastructure.

R. V. Ferrell;
Metropolitan State Coll. of Denver, Denver, CO.

3:45 pm Panel Discussion.

The purpose of this session is to present to the audience and then for all to jointly consider with the audience, the problems of nutrient loading, nitrogen loading, and pathogen discharge, upon aquatic ecosystems. These three problems have diverse effects but all three problems simultaneously result from human wastewater discharges. And, often all three can be properly managed with common solutions. We will discuss which solutions are most suitable for various aquatic environments to make those enviroments safe for not only our usage, but also to importantly consider and reduce the disruption which our contaminants cause for the natural residents of those aquatic environments. Between the speakers, we understand all three problems and their impacts upon a broad range of aquatic considerations. Together, we have experience with identifying and trying to manage those problems in South America and Mexico. Plus, in the U.S., we have experience around the Great Lakes, and coastal areas along the Atlantic and Pacific oceans as well as the Gulf of Mexico.

Symposium  

197/S. Papillomavirus Vaccines and New Biology 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

052 A

Convener:

R. L. Garcea;
Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center@Fitzsimons, Audora, CO.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Division S Lecture: HPV Vaccines: Bench to Bedside.

J. Schiller;
NIH/NCI, Betheda, MD.

3:30 pm Next Generation HPV Vaccines.

R. L. Garcea;
Univ. of Colorado Hlth. Sci. Ctr., Aurora, CO.

4:00 pm HPV Infection and Skin Cancer.

D. Galloway;
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Res. Ctr., Seattle, WA.

4:30 pm Animal Models for HPV Disease.

P. Lambert;
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is among the most common sexually transmitted diseases, and is causally linked to the development of cervical cancer. The new HPV vaccines are a triumph of modern translational medicine. Dr. Schiller will describe the development of the vaccines from basic science through clinical validation. He will also discuss the latest findings in the biology of HPV infection. Dr. Garcea will speculate on the “next generation” of HPV vaccines designed to be affordable in underdeveloped areas of the world, and the potential for therapeutic HPV vaccines to treat existing infections. Dr. Galloway will evaluate the possibility that cutaneous HPV infections may have a causative role in certain skin cancers. Dr. Lambert will describe transgenic mouse models that study individual HPV genes and their roles in pathogenesis.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Evaluate the effectiveness of HPV vaccines and their potential to prevent human cancer.

Symposium  

198/U. New Perspectives on Mechanisms of Redox Sensing by Mycobacterium tuberculosis 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

206 A

Convener:

A. J. C. Steyn;
Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Thiol Redox Status in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

R. C. Fahey;
Univ. of Calif., La Jolla, CA.

3:00 pm WhiB-Family Gene Expression under Granuloma-Like Conditions.

W. R. Bishai;
Johns Hopkins Sch. of Med., Baltimore, MD.

3:30 pm The TB Sleep Routine -- Hypoxia Beyond Dos.

D. Sherman;
Seattle Biomedical Res. Inst., Seattle, WA.

4:00 pm Sniffing Protective Host Signals through Fe-S and Heme-Based Sensor Proteins.

A. Kumar;
Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL.

The ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to maintain a state of latent TB infection is responsible for its remarkable success as a pathogen. Since oxygen tension and nitric oxide are thought to play a crucial role in mycobacterial persistence, a fundamental challenge in the redox biology of Mtb is to understand the mechanisms involved in sensing these host signals. Also, how are these protective signals being monitored by Mtb and what are the bacterial components necessary for the control of cellular redox homeostasis and protection from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species? Recent studies have shown that Mtb has evolved sophisticated thiol-, heme- and Fe-S cluster-based systems to sense and respond to these signals. This symposium will present new genetic, biochemical and expression-based approaches that allow investigators to examine how the bacilli sense and adapt to altered redox environments and to initiate new metabolic pathways implicated in persistence. The audience should have some knowledge of bacterial metabolism and redox sensing mechanisms.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Discuss how Mtb metabolism and cellular integrity are maintained by balancing the intracellular redox state for optimal overall function.

• Communicate new findings on Mtb redox homeostasis to the ability of the bacterium to initiate protective metabolic pathways in response to redox imbalance.

• Recognize how Mtb exploit redox-sensing systems to monitor host signals implicated in persistence.

• Relate new findings in Mtb redox biology to in vivo expression and persistence.

Symposium  

199/Y. Practical Solutions to Reducing the Cost and Improving the Quality and Accessibility of Testing Services for CD4 Cell Counting in Resource-Limited Countries 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

107 A

Convener:

R. Timperi;
Association of Pub. Hlth. Lab., Silver Spring, MD.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Gen-Probe Joseph Award and Division Y Lecture: My Tryst with Public Health: An Exciting Journey and a Glimpse into the Future.

B. A. Swaminathan;
IHRC, Inc., Atlanta, GA.

3:30 pm CD4 testing: How to Do Quality Testing for Less Money.

F. F. Mandy;
Intl. Ctr. for Infectious Diseases, Winnipeg, MB, CANADA.

4:00 pm The Challenges For Performing Quality CD4 Testing In Resource-Limited Countries.

I. V. Jani;
Inst. Nacional de Salud, Mauto, MOZAMBIQUE.

4:30 pm Implementing Quality Assurance Effectively In Resource Limited Settings.

P. Fernandes;
Association of Pub. Hlth. Lab., Silver Spring, VA.

This session presents theoretical and empirical information related to CD4 cell counting by various methods and provides insights and recommendations on what is needed and feasible in resource limited countries; discusses successes and challenges in laboratory practices in Mozambique; and presents a summary of best practices for implementing external quality control in resource limited settings based on experience in several African countries. This session will also include the Division Y Award Lecture given by the Gen-Probe Joseph Award Recipient for Excellence in Public Health Microbiology.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Identify the gaps and challenges in diagnostic testing to support treatment and prevention of priority infectious diseases in developing countries.

• Explain the strengths and weaknesses of strategies for transfer of technology.

• Identify the critical elements in a testing method suitable for enumeration of CD4 lymphocytes and sustainable in a resource limited setting

• Explain the history of infectious diseases related to food borne illnesses and the challenges of food safety in the future.

Special Interest Symposium  

200. The Fungal Kingdom: Diverse and Essential Roles in Earth's Ecosystem

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Ballroom West

Conveners:

F. Dromer;
Inst. Pasteur, Paris, FRANCE.

J. Heitman;
Duke Univ. Med. Ctr., Durham, NC.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Human Fungal Pathogens.

J. R. Perfect;
Duke Univ. Med. Ctr., Durham, NC.

3:00 pm Evolutionary Biology and Pathogenicity in Disease-Causing Fungi: Coccidioides Species.

J. W. Taylor;
Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA.

3:30 pm Host-Range and Host-Fungus Interactions: A Look Ahead to Completed Dermatophyte Genomes.

T. C. White;
Seattle Biomedical Res. Inst., Seattle, WA.

4:00 pm Intercellular Signaling in Single-species and Mixed-Species Fungal Communities.

D. A. Hogan;
Dartmouth Med. Sch., Hanover, NH.

4:30 pm Fungal-Insect Interactions: Yeasts in the Guts of Beetles.

M. Blackwell;
Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA.

Fungi are exceedingly diverse - from those that are common food sources and recycle nutrients in the environment, to yeasts used in brewing and baking, to important symbionts with algae and cyanobacteria in lichens, to ubiquitous pathogens of plants and animals. Therefore, fungi represent both a threat to the ecosystem and necessary element in the balance. The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium on fungi in 2007, and this session will report on some of the conclusions from that meeting. Certain fungi are able to cause disease in plants, animals, humans, and even protozoa. Hence, fungi are non-specific pathogens with such a broad host range that they can be considered trans-kingdom pathogens. Several plant pathogenic fungi and one human pathogenic fungus are included on lists of agents with significant potential for bioterrorism. However, relatively little attention has been given to the weapon potential of fungi in contrast to bacteria and viruses. Consequently, there is concern that an inadequate understanding of fungal pathogenesis, combined with underdevelopment in diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines, could leave society vulnerable to fungal-derived biological weapons.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Describe the various roles Fungi play in the ecosystem.

• Demonstrate the potential for fungi to serve as a weapon in bioterrorism and what steps can be taken to prevent or counteract such attacks.

• Identify areas of fungal research that need further development and steps that can be taken towards improving these areas.

Special Interest Symposium  

201. Research Activities in Today’s Clinical Microbiology and Immunology Laboratories: Life Beyond the Board Exams 

Co-Sponsored By: AAM

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

104 A

Conveners:

B. Detrick;
Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD.

M. T. LaRocco;
St. Luke's Episcopal Hosp., Houston, TX.

Presentations:

2:30 pm TREK Diagnostics ABMM/ABMLI Professional Recognition Award: Regulations, Reimbursement, and Reality: Conundrums in Clinical Research.

V. S. Baselski;
Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN.

3:00 pm Ogston, Conan-Doyle, and The Curious Case of MRSA and Other Epidemiologic Mysteries.

W. M. Dunne, Jr.;
Washington Univ. Sch. of Med., St. Louis, MO.

3:30 pm Molecular Diagnostics: Curriculum Development and Training the Masses.

S. Orton;
Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.

4:00 pm Performing Research In A Resource-Ignorant Setting: Possibilities Galore.

K. C. Chapin;
Rhode Island Hosp., Providence, RI.

4:30 pm Monitoring Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immunity in Recipients of Organ Transplants.

J. L. Schmitz;
Univ. of North Carolina Hosp., Chapel Hill, NC.

ABMM and ABMLI diplomates are leaders in the fields of clinical microbiology and clinical immunology. As directors of laboratories in health care institutions, universities, and industry, these individuals make important scientific contributions to their fields. The program will highlight the scientific achievements of ABMM and ABMLI diplomates. The intent is to provide the audience with a perspective on the scientific research conducted by clinical microbiologists and immunologists and demonstrate the value of ABMM and ABMLI certification. By showcasing leading diplomates, the symposium will recruit graduate students and post-graduate students who may be contemplating health-care related careers in clinical microbiology and immunology.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Recognize the research contributions made by clinical microbiologists and clinical immunologists.

• Associate the value of ABMM and ABMLI certification with these professions, and

• Evaluate career opportunities in clinical microbiology and clinical immunology.

Special Interest Symposium

202. Teaching Careers for Microbiologists 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

153 A

Convener:

L. R. Aaronson;
Utica Coll., Utica, NY.

Presentations:

2:30 pm Teaching in a Pre-College Institution.

R. F. Gritzer;
Choate Rosemary Hall, Wallingford, CT.

3:00 pm Teaching at a Community College and Online Teaching.

J. A. Herzog;
Herkimer County Community Coll., Herkimer, NY.

3:30 pm Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowships.

J. A. Bennett;
Juniata Coll., Huntingdon, PA.

4:00 pm Teaching in Non-Doctoral Colleges and Universities.

L. R. Aaronson;
Utica Coll., Utica, NY.

4:30 pm Teaching in a Clinical Setting.

J. Hudzicki;
Kansas Univ. Med. Ctr., Kansas City, KS.

This session is targeted to undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and others interested in teaching careers and seeking career information. A panel of experts representing microbiologists working in a variety of educational settings has been assembled to answer questions regarding career preparation and employment in these diverse institutions. Topics may include the current employment outlook, what to expect as a faculty member, balancing a career and family life, and how to prepare for the desired position, but will be directed more by the types of questions posed. The format will be a Roundtable discussion with each panel member providing a brief introduction of their background and position followed by an open discussion with the audience.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Describe teaching careers in a variety of educational settings.

• Identify individuals who are employed as educators working in variety of educational settings.

Special Interest Symposium

203. Infectious Diseases in the Developing World: Fostering International Scientific Exchange 

2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

258 B

Conveners:

K. P. Klugman;
Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA.

E. Calva;
Inst. de Biotecnología UNAM, Cuernavaca, Morelos, MEXICO.

Presentations:

2:30 pm First SARS and then Bird-flu: Are We Heading for a Pandemic?

Names not Available at Press Time.

3:00 pm ADIS Vaccine Research from Laboratory Design to Clinical Study.

Y. Shao;
Chinese Ctr. for Disease Control & Prevention, Beijing, CHINA.

3:30 pm Microbial Ecology and Risk Assessment In Aquatic Environments: V. Cholerae and V. Parahaemolyticus.

I. N. G. Rivera;
Univ. de São Paulo, São Paulo, BRAZIL.

4:00 pm Tick Borne Diseases in Cameroon.

L. M. A. Ndip;
Univ. of Buea, Buea, CAMEROON.

4:30 pm Taking Molecular and Other Novel Microbiological Diagnostic Platforms Into Africa.

A. G. Duse;
NHLS, Houghton, SOUTH AFRICA.

This session will illustrate, by presentations of investigators from five developing countries, the impact of specific infectious diseases in the developing world, as well as strategies undertaken for their study and control. Bacterial and viral pathogens will be discussed, covering aspects of clinical microbiology, epidemiology, diagnostics, and microbial ecology. Ideas will be generated to foster significant international collaboration in basic and applied research. Attendees are expected to have an interest in the pathogenesis and epidemiology of bacterial or viral infectious diseases.

Upon completion of this session, participants should be able to:

• Describe changing risk for global influenza pandemic emergence.

• Contrast the response of developing countries to developed countries’ approach to AIDS vaccine development.

• Explain the challenges of introducing molecular diagnostics in clinical laboratories in Africa.

Presidents Forum  

204. Pathogenic Mechanisms for Avoidance of Host Recognition 

5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

253 A

Convener:

C. W. Houston;
Univ. of Texas Med. Branch, Galveston, TX.

Presentations:

5:30 pm Evasion of Antiviral Defenses by Human Hepatitis Viruses.

S. M. Lemon;
Univ .of Texas Med. Branch, Galveston, TX.

6:00 pm A Tale of Remarkable Adaptation: Immune Evasion and Exploitation by Helminth Parasites.

J. H. McKerrow;
Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA.

6:30 pm Shigella, a Tool Box to Study Innate Immunity.

P. J. Sansonetti;
Inst. Pasteur, Paris, FRANCE.

Three of the world's top microbiologists in their respective fields will discuss the mystifying question of how microorganisms are able to avoid and/or protect themselves against recognition by the host's immune system. The discussion hopefully will include an understanding of pathogenic mechanisms involved in this avoidance phenomenon and perhaps approaches to how to render the microorganisms more vulnerable to host recognition.

Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

• Describe the function of specific virulence factors of microorganisms that facilitate avoidance of host recognition; and

• Describe what signals are activated to trigger an immune response against a specific microorganism.